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Old 08-10-2016, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,053 posts, read 4,084,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Richmond is already doing quite well for itself; while tobacco is still big there, the economy is pretty diversified. The metro has five or six F500 headquarters, which is a lot for its size. And its downtown is quite healthy overall. Richmond has tons of historic structures which have been converted and adaptively reused and it's been that way for some time now.
Good.
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Old 08-10-2016, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,053 posts, read 4,084,313 times
Reputation: 3661
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
Nope. 8 in Richmond on that list
Two were added this year, 6 in 2015 (PFG went back to a public company and Markel made the top 500).
That is excellent. It appears that none of Richmond's peers can say the same. I have heard over and over about Richmond's downtown, but very little about the metro area. What's going on there?
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Old 08-10-2016, 03:20 PM
 
899 posts, read 764,676 times
Reputation: 1195
Just building more McMansions and lifestyle centers...
There are a few large office parks in Henrico and Chesterfield (and Goochland). That's where Rolls Royce, CarMax, Capital One, Amazon, PFG etc. are located.

Typical suburbs with Nordstrom, Sax, REI, Whole Foods and Wegmans... Nothing really interesting going on out there (a few town centers being developed) but they have very good schools and high wages.


It looks like this...

http://www.henricomonthly.com/images...illage4413.jpg

http://mlsphotos.idxbroker.com/4f26/...69b3442f7/b127

Last edited by spencer114; 08-10-2016 at 03:33 PM..
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:31 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
Reputation: 13282
Charleston, WV.
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:12 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,134 times
Reputation: 1838
Richmond VA, Birmingham AL, Memphis TN, Jacksonville FL, Little Rock AR, New Orleans LA, and Louisville KY all fit the bill to some degree
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:27 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,903 posts, read 2,009,925 times
Reputation: 5838
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Honestly the only cities I can think of in the South that have Rust Belt characteristics are Louisville, Huntington, WV, and other cities along the Ohio River and near the southern periphery of the Midwest. There really aren't any others.
It's more common to find a "rust belt" feel in small Southern towns that almost no one outside of the area has heard of. These typically have industry limited to one or a few sectors that have been hit hard with no other economic diversification, and lack tourism draw, or close enough proximity to prosperous metro areas to benefit from.
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:47 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
Just building more McMansions and lifestyle centers...
There are a few large office parks in Henrico and Chesterfield (and Goochland). That's where Rolls Royce, CarMax, Capital One, Amazon, PFG etc. are located.

Typical suburbs with Nordstrom, Sax, REI, Whole Foods and Wegmans... Nothing really interesting going on out there (a few town centers being developed) but they have very good schools and high wages.


It looks like this...

http://www.henricomonthly.com/images...illage4413.jpg

http://mlsphotos.idxbroker.com/4f26/...69b3442f7/b127
Right...outside of Petersburg (which has seen better days), it's just typical suburbia for the most part.
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Old 08-11-2016, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
449 posts, read 818,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jowel View Post
It's more common to find a "rust belt" feel in small Southern towns that almost no one outside of the area has heard of. These typically have industry limited to one or a few sectors that have been hit hard with no other economic diversification, and lack tourism draw, or close enough proximity to prosperous metro areas to benefit from.
True. It's really another example of the Urban/Rural divide in the country. In the South, the areas that are most likely to have rust belt characteristics are the smaller towns that had manufacturing bases that was completely decimated. One GA city that comes to mind is Fitzgerald, GA. It's basically Flint lite, without as much blight (even though it's getting there) and of course, better water. In the last 10 years, they lost GM, Coachmen, and a large percentage of the jobs at Shaw Floors. Not to mention the domino effect of the smaller businesses closing because of so many good paying jobs disappearing. Most of those jobs, with the exception of Shaw, were good paying union jobs. Plus throw in the fact that because of technology and automation, CSX Railroad doesn't employ nearly as many people there as they did during the heyday years. Those were also good paying union jobs.

Albany is another city that has suffered industrialization to a large scale and in pretty much in the same boat. There are numerous other cities in GA in the same predicament, but because of the fact that most of these cities are smaller with less than 100K in population, they don't get the pub or attention that their larger brethren get.
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Old 08-15-2016, 07:08 PM
 
305 posts, read 238,078 times
Reputation: 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordwillin02 View Post
I've always gone by the 11 states that seceded, do you classify Delaware as "southern" then too?
So all the states that didn't secede would be considered the North in your mind. In effect you consider the country, TODAY, to be lumped into two categories, states that did secede SOUTH, and states that didn't NORTH. Would you consider Kentucky to be in the North. Kentucky is a quintessential Southern state, only an idiot would argue any differently. What about Florida? It was one of the original states in the Confederacy, but the majority of the people that live in that state would not define themselves as Southern. Whereas a good portion of people in West Virginia would not classify themselves as Northern, regardless of their states history. We live in modern times and trying to classify a state by what it represesnted in the past is kind of silly.
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Old 08-15-2016, 07:39 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by arc-lang View Post
So all the states that didn't secede would be considered the North in your mind. In effect you consider the country, TODAY, to be lumped into two categories, states that did secede SOUTH, and states that didn't NORTH. Would you consider Kentucky to be in the North. Kentucky is a quintessential Southern state, only an idiot would argue any differently. What about Florida? It was one of the original states in the Confederacy, but the majority of the people that live in that state would not define themselves as Southern. Whereas a good portion of people in West Virginia would not classify themselves as Northern, regardless of their states history. We live in modern times and trying to classify a state by what it represesnted in the past is kind of silly.
Kentucky is Southern but I'd hardly call it a quintessential Southern state.
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