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Old 07-16-2016, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,633 posts, read 2,782,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
lacking improvement in that don't see the overall demographic swing toward higher salary/better educated residents happening like it has in NY, DC or even Baltimore.
wut

Other than San Diego, Philadelphia is increasing it's population of bachelor degree holder's faster than the other 8 largest cities in the country. I know you hate Philly with a passion, but that is a lie.

Largest US Cities Change In Degree Holders

Philadelphia's Millenial Population Has Exploded
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Old 07-16-2016, 02:44 PM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,359,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
wut

Other than San Diego, Philadelphia is increasing it's population of bachelor degree holder's faster than the other 8 largest cities in the country. I know you hate Philly with a passion, but that is a lie.

Largest US Cities Change In Degree Holders

Philadelphia's Millenial Population Has Exploded
Increasing percentages from a low baseline doesn't equate to a massive influx into the city at large. I realize you're probably one of the many Philly cheerleaders on this forum, but let's be realistic. The Center City area and periphery is only so large and that's by and large where the influx is occurring...and certainly isn't in North Philly, Northeast Philly, SW Philly, most of West Philly or far reaching South Philly.
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Old 07-16-2016, 03:37 PM
 
387 posts, read 366,329 times
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Why do some urban-o-logist actually believe people will be "pushed out" to the outskirts of the megaopolis?
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Old 07-16-2016, 04:03 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,974 posts, read 3,456,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
Several years ago I was at a party in Baltimore talking to a middle class Black man who worked for the Federal Government at a DC location. He told me that he lived in a beautiful house on Mt. Royal Terrace, the nicest part of Reservoir Hill. According to him, his Black coworkers told him that a he would be passed over for potential promotions because they felt that middle class Black people should live in PG County. Living in Baltimore branded him as low class and made him highly suspicious. In other words, I strongly agree that very few Black DC residents would consider living in Baltimore under any circumstances. The animosity of White DC folks towards Baltimore is real, but perhaps not quite as strong.

Here is a link to Mt. Royal Terrace: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3112...2!8i6656?hl=en
A female friend of mine from Park Heights, West Baltimore born and raised, works at a law firm in DC, has two kids and couldn't sing the praises of PG County any higher. She told me verbatim "I will never move back to Baltimore so long as I live, and neither will my kids."
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Old 07-16-2016, 05:16 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 1,032,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
A female friend of mine from Park Heights, West Baltimore born and raised, works at a law firm in DC, has two kids and couldn't sing the praises of PG County any higher. She told me verbatim "I will never move back to Baltimore so long as I live, and neither will my kids."
There is a big difference between Park Heights and Mt. Royal Terrace. Park Heights is the smallest of the three big clusters clusters of poverty and crime in Baltimore. I wouldn't want to live there either and I can see why growing up there would give anyone a bad attitude towards the city.

Besides that, I don't understand why people should be penalized by there employer for living someplace that the employer doesn't approve of. That happened to me when I lived in Baltimore City and worked in Towson. My boss was on my case about it all the time.
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Old 07-16-2016, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,523,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Philadelphia hasn't until now featured the type of pro-business government that has driven the development/investment seen in other cities (nearly half of city residents leave the city for work each day, much of which is service sector jobs in the suburbs) and lacking improvement in that don't see the overall demographic swing toward higher salary/better educated residents happening like it has in NY, DC or even Baltimore.
Philadephia also doesnt have the benefit of being the planets HQ like NYC or Federal Hub drenched in Billion dollar government contracts(DC). Baltimores slightly better per capita stats compared to Philly can probably be addressed to Bal proximity to DC.


I spend equal time in the city and Philly suburbs and the NYC's presence is regionally wide spread across every racial , social,religious , financial demographic . For every poor person moving to a seedy part of Philly there is a wealthy NYer moving to Center City or one of the well-to-do suburbs.

A Brooklyn family priced out of NYC can live very comfortably in the Philly area and still be less than 2 hours from family.They get the benefits of incredible public school systems in the Philly suburbs and a lower cost of living..

It used to be you would see more NJ license plates in PA that has changed big time now its NY plates everywhere. City,suburbs, out in the country(Lancaster, Lehigh Valley,Poconos).
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Old 07-16-2016, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,453 posts, read 7,520,622 times
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There's no question that migration from New York to Philly is having a direct effect on growth in the city:

Population shift: People ditching N.Y. area for Philly by the thousands | NJ.com

And there's no absolutely no reason to believe that they're disproportionately "low-income," particularly as housing prices in Philly have very recently reached record levels:

Economist: Philadelphia housing prices reach record levels | PhillyVoice

That only happens when folks of higher incomes are investing in real estate, not vice versa. Additionally, investment/development is most certainly reaching most neighborhoods of the city, contrary to the outdated assumption that it's only confined to Center City and immediate areas (if you do a simple search of local real estate news in Philly and various home/commercial construction, the widespread scale of development projects across the city is very quickly evident).

In addition, while it was indeed long true that Philly proper was eschewed in favor of the suburbs for employment growth, patrticular for jobs requiring higher education, it's become very evident, vis-a-vis reports, news, and jobs data that the city itself is experiencing impressive growth in young professionals and jobs in traditionally higher paying sectors (i.e., professional and business services and education/health). Sources here:

City Observatory report on migration of college educated young adults: http://cityobservatory.org/wp-conten...port-Final.pdf

Bureau of Labor Statisics data (comparing year-over-year jobs employment data between May 2015 and May 2016):
Philadelphia Area Employment ? May 2016 : Mid?Atlantic Information Office : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Despite some lingering outdated perceptions, Philadelphia is very much a city of choice among many demographics.
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Old 07-16-2016, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,523,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
There's no question that migration from New York to Philly is having a direct effect on growth in the city:

Population shift: People ditching N.Y. area for Philly by the thousands | NJ.com

And there's no absolutely no reason to believe that they're disproportionately "low-income," particularly as housing prices in Philly have very recently reached record levels:
Interesting numbers . That was data from 2009-2013 and from my recent experiences those numbers have accelerated from 2014-present. I was out in Media and West Chester today ( western burbs of philly) and I counted 20-30 plates from NY in a couple hours.
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Old 07-17-2016, 02:50 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,578,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingtoGoSomewhere View Post
Philly is going to get more expensive as well. These things don't last forever.
God I hope Philly doesn't turn into NYC
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Old 07-17-2016, 02:51 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,578,118 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I agree with this. I think a lot of the population who has the means to do so will spread over time to suburban/exurban areas. Kind of how in Los Angeles a lot of lower-income people were priced out inland in to San Bernardino/Riverside Counties.
I think in New York, the rents don't get any cheaper until you're in the exurbs.
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