U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-19-2016, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,513,232 times
Reputation: 1861

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
In my opinion, any metro less than 4 million is not a large metro. But that's just me.
Well, hopefully the op returns and gives us clarity on his interpretation of what a large city is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-19-2016, 06:51 PM
 
2,512 posts, read 2,274,345 times
Reputation: 1835
No no no no to Atlanta.... especially if your coming from SF and youre in your 20s! Not that Atl is a bad city its just not a good next step and I think it would be a hard transition.

What about DC, you can still afford to live off of your salary. Its not a cheap city but the cost is living especially housing is much cheaper.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2016, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
No no no no to Atlanta.... especially if your coming from SF and youre in your 20s! Not that Atl is a bad city its just not a good next step and I think it would be a hard transition.

What about DC, you can still afford to live off of your salary. Its not a cheap city but the cost is living especially housing is much cheaper.
DC is extremely expensive. I don't think the OP wants that. Yes, it's significantly cheaper than SF Bay area, but it's not affordable by any means. However, IF the OP doesn't mind the extremely high cost of living in DC, then I would say it would be another good choice for sure!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2016, 08:38 PM
 
161 posts, read 181,637 times
Reputation: 128
I think Atlanta and Dallas would work if you're comfortable being around southern culture. You'd probably want to live in east Atlanta or Decatur for the Atlanta region.

I generally agree with the 4 million metro area being a minimum size threshold for decent gay dating with a few caveats. I am gay and the same age as you and when I moved from Raleigh Durham to greater Boston the dating scene was immensely better. I think Denver is worth considering even though it's not over 4 million. There's so many young professionals there that the gay dating scene is still strong.

Philly is another contender given its walkable, good transit and more affordable. The climate isn't that bad in my opinion. I'm not sure how gay dating is in Phoenix but that may be another affordable option.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2016, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheel84 View Post
I think Atlanta and Dallas would work if you're comfortable being around southern culture. You'd probably want to live in east Atlanta or Decatur for the Atlanta region.

I generally agree with the 4 million metro area being a minimum size threshold for decent gay dating with a few caveats. I am gay and the same age as you and when I moved from Raleigh Durham to greater Boston the dating scene was immensely better. I think Denver is worth considering even though it's not over 4 million. There's so many young professionals there that the gay dating scene is still strong.

Philly is another contender given its walkable, good transit and more affordable. The climate isn't that bad in my opinion. I'm not sure how gay dating is in Phoenix but that may be another affordable option.
Funny you say that though. I'm 32, gay and have found that metro area size doesn't really affect dating prospects that much. I lived in NYC for a couple years and although I met many guys, I thought that it was very competitive and everyone was just waiting for a better guy to come along. NYC is an extra large metro. Then, I also lived in Columbus, OH (a medium sized metro) and met approximately just as many guys and dating prospects as I did in NYC. And of course, I've lived in different parts of CT over the years, which has a small gay community, and although it can be challenging, I wouldn't say that my "gay life" was any less satisfying than it was in the bigger cities like NYC or even Columbus. Dating is really a crapshoot, from my experience. The perfect match could be living in a small city. In fact, there are some advantages to being gay in a small metro, in terms of dating prospects. I know many gay guys living in big cities who are chronically single and complain about the gay community in those big cities. So, that's why I completely quit caring about city/metro size for gay life. I'm not saying to live out in the middle of nowhere, obviously.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2016, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,771,019 times
Reputation: 8804
Surprised New Orleans hasn't been mentioned. I'm not gay but NO is known for it's Decadence Parade and being very gay friendly. Could live in a walkable neighborhood on that salary and everything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2016, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Surprised New Orleans hasn't been mentioned. I'm not gay but NO is known for it's Decadence Parade and being very gay friendly. Could live in a walkable neighborhood on that salary and everything.
New Orleans has a small gay population though, compared to what the OP is looking for. Remember, the OP is coming from the SF bay area, which has over 4 million people. I can't imagine he'd want a much smaller gay community than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2016, 07:17 AM
 
3 posts, read 2,200 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you all for your responses thus far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Well, hopefully the op returns and gives us clarity on his interpretation of what a large city is.
By "large LGBT population" I meant more "visible" (or as someone else here put it, "significant") vs. a particular size or scope. I'm not much into the bar and club scene, but I'd like there to be other LGBT-specific social outlets available (i.e. book clubs, social groups, etc.). The overall size of the city does not matter as much to me vs. the LGBT population. That said, I think I'd feel happiest in a mid-size or larger city (300K-400K and up, I guess?). But I'm open to smaller cities too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2016, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by echo1134 View Post
Thank you all for your responses thus far.



By "large LGBT population" I meant more "visible" (or as someone else here put it, "significant") vs. a particular size or scope. I'm not much into the bar and club scene, but I'd like there to be other LGBT-specific social outlets available (i.e. book clubs, social groups, etc.). The overall size of the city does not matter as much to me vs. the LGBT population. That said, I think I'd feel happiest in a mid-size or larger city (300K-400K and up, I guess?). But I'm open to smaller cities too.
It's easier to think about it on a metropolitan area basis rather than just the core city. For example, Columbus, Ohio has a city population of 800,000, but the metro area is only 2 million. But Boston has a city population of around 600,000 in a metro area of around 4.5 million. So even though Boston is a smaller city than Columbus, the metro area is much bigger, more bustling and urban like.

Last edited by nep321; 07-20-2016 at 08:22 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2016, 08:34 AM
 
3 posts, read 2,200 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
It's easier to think about it on a metropolitan area basis rather than just the core city. For example, Columbus, Ohio has a city population of 800,000, but the metro area is only 2 million. But Boston has a city population of around 600,000 in a metro area of around 4.5 million. So even though Boston is a smaller city than Columbus, the metro area is much bigger, more bustling and urban like.
Ah, that's a good point. I hadn't really thought about it in those terms previously. I think I would want to go no smaller than about 2 million people, though 3-4 million+ would probably be ideal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top