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Old 07-21-2016, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
Reputation: 2089

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I lived in Columbus for 9 months, recently. It's alright. It does have a fairly large gay population indeed. But ALL of the gays are concentrated in the downtown area, for the most part. And the downtown area is expensive.
If you don't mind me asking what general neighborhood did you live in?

I mean it makes sense that most gay men (and younger people in general) will want to live closer to the core of the city in walking distance to gay bars, night life in general, museums, art galleries, restaurants etc. I assume you're referring to the short north? There are gays everywhere in Columbus but we tend to congregate around OSU, Grandview, Short North, OTE, Italian Village and Victorian Village. Why would a young single gay man want to live in Dublin or a far flung suburb that is meant for families and driving a SUV to take the kids to soccer practice?

Depending on your building I would say it's 1,000-1500 for a brand new one bedroom (you can go lower or higher) in the short north. Personally I don't think that's terribly expensive to live in a great neighborhood compared to many other cities but if you're worried about expenses get a 2 bed room and a roomate or check out different sections of the city.
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Old 07-21-2016, 05:02 PM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,269,683 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
The whole culture argument about Atlanta is kind of stupid. Yes, the culture in ATL is different than SF. But as with anything in life, you adapt and get USED TO IT! I'm gay and I'm comfortable being anywhere in the country, no matter what state, city or whether it's an urban or rural location. I opened my mind and realized that people are people, just with different accents and interests, for the most part.
Thats great for you but more then less, people have preferences and dont just get over it. If so why would we even have half of these discussions on city-data. I mean with your attitude everyone should be fine with every city so no arguments or debates.
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Old 07-21-2016, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
If you don't mind me asking what general neighborhood did you live in?

I mean it makes sense that most gay men (and younger people in general) will want to live closer to the core of the city in walking distance to gay bars, night life in general, museums, art galleries, restaurants etc. I assume you're referring to the short north? There are gays everywhere in Columbus but we tend to congregate around OSU, Grandview, Short North, OTE, Italian Village and Victorian Village. Why would a young single gay man want to live in Dublin or a far flung suburb that is meant for families and driving a SUV to take the kids to soccer practice?

Depending on your building I would say it's 1,000-1500 for a brand new one bedroom (you can go lower or higher) in the short north. Personally I don't think that's terribly expensive to live in a great neighborhood compared to many other cities but if you're worried about expenses get a 2 bed room and a roomate or check out different sections of the city.
$1,000 - $1,500 is a lot for Columbus and Ohio in general. Remember, wages in Columbus/Ohio are LOW compared to the U.S. average. Rent of $1,000 is equivalent to rent of $2,000 in the SF Bay area.
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Old 07-21-2016, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
$1,000 - $1,500 is a lot for Columbus and Ohio in general. Remember, wages in Columbus/Ohio are LOW compared to the U.S. average. Rent of $1,000 is equivalent to rent of $2,000 in the SF Bay area.
I don't think the wages are low but obviously aren't as high as Manhattan/any giant city. The average one bedroom in SF is 3,000 and I'm sure that goes up if you look into the prime neighborhoods. Sorry you didn't enjoy your time in Columbus
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Old 07-21-2016, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I don't think the wages are low but obviously aren't as high as Manhattan/any giant city. The average one bedroom in SF is 3,000 and I'm sure that goes up if you look into the prime neighborhoods. Sorry you didn't enjoy your time in Columbus
Actually, the wages in Columbus are MUCH lower than they are in Manhattan. Are you serious? Lol. This is factually proven by the Bureau of Labor Statistics website, for any given occupation. When I was working in Stamford, CT I was earning a grand total of $94K. But when I moved to Columbus, my income dropped to $66K for a very, very similar job in the same occupation. Then, when I moved back to Hartford, CT it went up to $70K now. Technically, I'm underpaid now and should really be making at least $80K, but I'll live with it. At least my current job is the best job yet.
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Old 07-21-2016, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Actually, the wages in Columbus are MUCH lower than they are in Manhattan. Are you serious? Lol. This is factually proven by the Bureau of Labor Statistics website, for any given occupation. When I was working in Stamford, CT I was earning a grand total of $94K. But when I moved to Columbus, my income dropped to $66K for a very, very similar job in the same occupation. Then, when I moved back to Hartford, CT it went up to $70K now. Technically, I'm underpaid now and should really be making at least $80K, but I'll live with it. At least my current job is the best job yet.
I said the wages in Columbus obviously aren't (as in ARE NOT) as high as Manhattan or any really large city. However, If the OP is coming from The Bay Area then I think he will find Columbus housing and general cost of living to be cheaper even with a reduced salary.

Based on a quick web search.

"Consumer Prices in San Francisco, CA are 34.40% higher than in Columbus, OH
Consumer Prices Including Rent in San Francisco, CA are 103.40% higher than in Columbus, OH
Rent Prices in San Francisco, CA are 261.77% higher than in Columbus, OH
Restaurant Prices in San Francisco, CA are 43.73% higher than in Columbus, OH
Groceries Prices in San Francisco, CA are 46.21% higher than in Columbus, OH
Local Purchasing Power in San Francisco, CA is 21.40% lower than in Columbus, OH"


If you disagree and don't think Columbus is a good city to live in as an LGBT individual that's completely fine. I respectively disagree and am giving the OP a honest assessment of the pros and cons of the city from my perspective.
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Old 07-22-2016, 12:52 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,481 posts, read 2,223,791 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Depending on your building I would say it's 1,000-1500 for a brand new one bedroom (you can go lower or higher) in the short north. Personally I don't think that's terribly expensive to live in a great neighborhood compared to many other cities but if you're worried about expenses get a 2 bed room and a roomate or check out different sections of the city.
What would the median price be for a one-bedroom apartment in the area be though? For comparison's sake, Lakeview in Chicago, which contains the Boystown neighborhood, has a median one-bedroom rent of about $1400.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
$1,000 - $1,500 is a lot for Columbus and Ohio in general. Remember, wages in Columbus/Ohio are LOW compared to the U.S. average. Rent of $1,000 is equivalent to rent of $2,000 in the SF Bay area.
A certain subset of Columbus' population is apparently able to afford it though. The same is true across the board in fairly inexpensive metros in the Midwest. New apartments in new buildings go for more, especially in buildings that come with a lot of amenities. It's just like they do everywhere else in the country.

Last edited by PerseusVeil; 07-22-2016 at 01:01 AM..
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Old 07-22-2016, 06:11 AM
 
1,462 posts, read 936,273 times
Reputation: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Thats great for you but more then less, people have preferences and dont just get over it. If so why would we even have half of these discussions on city-data. I mean with your attitude everyone should be fine with every city so no arguments or debates.
HEYYYY!LOL
So what if the Op is is black?I suppose Atlanta still in your mind would not be a fit either.
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Old 07-22-2016, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
What would the median price be for a one-bedroom apartment in the area be though? For comparison's sake, Lakeview in Chicago, which contains the Boystown neighborhood, has a median one-bedroom rent of about $1400.



A certain subset of Columbus' population is apparently able to afford it though. The same is true across the board in fairly inexpensive metros in the Midwest. New apartments in new buildings go for more, especially in buildings that come with a lot of amenities. It's just like they do everywhere else in the country.
I tried looking up median renal prices for comparison's sake. One website I found said the median one bedroom for SN is 1300 but the same source said the median one bedroom for Lakeview is almost $1,000 more? I'll take your word for it and assume that source (trulia) was way off.

Either way it's not difficult to find brand new apartment for $1,000 or slightly north for a one bedroom in the neighborhood. If that's out of the OP's price range there are other cheaper neighborhoods nearby.
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Old 07-22-2016, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I said the wages in Columbus obviously aren't (as in ARE NOT) as high as Manhattan or any really large city. However, If the OP is coming from The Bay Area then I think he will find Columbus housing and general cost of living to be cheaper even with a reduced salary.

Based on a quick web search.

"Consumer Prices in San Francisco, CA are 34.40% higher than in Columbus, OH
Consumer Prices Including Rent in San Francisco, CA are 103.40% higher than in Columbus, OH
Rent Prices in San Francisco, CA are 261.77% higher than in Columbus, OH
Restaurant Prices in San Francisco, CA are 43.73% higher than in Columbus, OH
Groceries Prices in San Francisco, CA are 46.21% higher than in Columbus, OH
Local Purchasing Power in San Francisco, CA is 21.40% lower than in Columbus, OH"


If you disagree and don't think Columbus is a good city to live in as an LGBT individual that's completely fine. I respectively disagree and am giving the OP a honest assessment of the pros and cons of the city from my perspective.
As an LGBT person who lived in Columbus for 9 months, I was able to get a reasonably good idea of the gay community there. It's just very concentrated in the urban core of the Columbus city limits, in a way that is unlike most other metropolitan areas. I lived within Columbus city limits, but was about 9 miles from downtown (Columbus is huge). And most guys didn't care to drive 20 minutes to see me and many of them had no car. It's pathetic. For a metro of 2 million, it is true that the gay population there is sizeable, but after a few months, everyone knows everyone already. That's why, I suggested cities that are more in line with the size of Atlanta, if he truly wants a reliable BIG gay population and reasonably affordable housing. God.
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