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Old 07-21-2016, 10:29 PM
 
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On one hand, the majority of urban cores have been rising lately, particularly in and near their downtowns. It's now possible to live a relatively urban lifestyle in more places.

But as NOLA101 said, some things are concentrating more than they used to. The desired cities are winning more dramatically. Companies have merged into giants, industries have concentrated into fewer cities, and wealth has concentrated.
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Old 07-21-2016, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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I think it depends what you mean by amenities and also comes down to personal preference.

Yes it's probably much easier to find Bangladeshi food or slam poetry in a New York City borough than it is in Columbus. The mass transit systems in denser, larger cities is going to be much better than most mid-sized cities that encompass large land areas. If you want a 24/7 night club then you'still probably would need go to Miami, LA or New York rather than Indianapolis or Cincinnati.

I would say that mid-sized cities tend to offer the same general amenities as larger cities but on a much smaller scale and with less variety. However, I don't really feel like there's a void in my life because I can't regularly get authentic yemeni food or visit the Metropolitan museum of Art.

I choose to make my life in a city with relatively low cost of living, manageable traffic and open space. I still go out with my friends regularly to trendy bars, have access to beautiful parks, enjoy an arts scene, live by a major university, enjoy sporting events, outdoor concerts, festivals etc. If I feel the need for a bigger city/a change of scene nothing is stopping me from driving to Chicago or hopping on a plane to New York or Miami for a weekend trip.
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Old 07-21-2016, 11:12 PM
 
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This is the academic paper that first documented the "superstar cities" effect a few years ago.

https://www.creativeclass.com/rfcgdb...ties_final.pdf

Long story short, places like Detroit and Cleveland and Cincy had similar income and education levels, and similar upward mobility, as places like NYC and SF and Boston, if you go back 30-40 years. Nowadays, there's a huge gap, growing over time. Wealth and talent are concentrating in a few hubs.
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Old 07-21-2016, 11:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is the academic paper that first documented the "superstar cities" effect a few years ago.

https://www.creativeclass.com/rfcgdb...ties_final.pdf

Long story short, places like Detroit and Cleveland and Cincy had similar income and education levels, and similar upward mobility, as places like NYC and SF and Boston, if you go back 30-40 years. Nowadays, there's a huge gap, growing over time. Wealth and talent are concentrating in a few hubs.
The study is a decade old
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Old 07-22-2016, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Here, the Republican suburbs and exurbs have moved ahead of the city core. There is everything you need with a lower cost of living, safer streets, and better schools. I can't even get people to come back to the city. They might come in once or twice a year for sporting events.
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Old 07-22-2016, 06:01 AM
 
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I think it may be in the last 15 year or so places with more "legacy" cultural institutions were outgrown by cities with less.
An example is Cleveland (which is now solidly mid-sized) vs Phoenix. Phoenix was slightly larger is 2000, but now is much larger. Or Atlanta vs Detroit.
Even "small cities" in the Northeast like Rochester, NY have legacy cultural institutions far beyond even larger cities in the South like Oklahoma City.
This is because for the most part cultural institutions, Orchestras, Theatres, Art Museams, etc. come from Old money, things that cities like Charlotte do not have yet.
Within the next Generation you will see a lot of now large Southern and Western Cities distance themselves from the old urban centers on the North as old money endowment becomes a thing, as these cities become generational.
I think its more the big cities in 1990 are not longer the big cities of today.
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Old 07-23-2016, 01:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Within the next Generation you will see a lot of now large Southern and Western Cities distance themselves from the old urban centers on the North as old money endowment becomes a thing, as these cities become generational.
I think its more the big cities in 1990 are not longer the big cities of today.
Kind of, but the newer cities without the legacy institutions will likely never have them. I mean, LA, which has 18 million in the metro, and is only topped by NYC, doesn't have any art museum that can hold a candle to that of Cleveland. Same goes for the symphony.

I mean, Cleveland! That isn't even a major city these days. If LA can't match up to the art museums in Detroit, Cleveland and the like, good luck with Charlotte doing the same. The issue is that all the "good art" is in private or institutional hands already so it's basically impossible to assemble.

Or even crazier, look at Toledo. That's a nothing city these days. But their art museum probably outranks that of Dallas, Atlanta or Miami. Or Buffalo, which has a better art museum than Toronto.
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Old 07-23-2016, 07:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Kind of, but the newer cities without the legacy institutions will likely never have them. I mean, LA, which has 18 million in the metro, and is only topped by NYC, doesn't have any art museum that can hold a candle to that of Cleveland. Same goes for the symphony.

I mean, Cleveland! That isn't even a major city these days. If LA can't match up to the art museums in Detroit, Cleveland and the like, good luck with Charlotte doing the same. The issue is that all the "good art" is in private or institutional hands already so it's basically impossible to assemble.

Or even crazier, look at Toledo. That's a nothing city these days. But their art museum probably outranks that of Dallas, Atlanta or Miami. Or Buffalo, which has a better art museum than Toronto.
The thing is the people who created all those institutions were like crazy Rich. For example everything in Pittsburgh is due to Andrew Carnegie, for Cleveland, John D Rockefeller. He was like Bill Gates Rich. Places out west or down south that at some point had a mega-wealthy person or 2 do have cultural institutions on par with the old Northern Cities, think San Francisco, Seattle, Atlanta.
On the other hand Buffalo, which was once the 10th largest City in the country doesn't have any of the legacy Cultural institutions because despite being large, they didn't have a mega-rich industrialist like other large Rustbelt cities. Even Places like Rochester, NY trace their major Theatres, Museums, Orchestra etc. to basically the owners of Kodak and the owners of Xerox, Mega-Rich industrialists.
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Old 07-23-2016, 08:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Kind of, but the newer cities without the legacy institutions will likely never have them. I mean, LA, which has 18 million in the metro, and is only topped by NYC, doesn't have any art museum that can hold a candle to that of Cleveland. Same goes for the symphony.

I mean, Cleveland! That isn't even a major city these days. If LA can't match up to the art museums in Detroit, Cleveland and the like, good luck with Charlotte doing the same. The issue is that all the "good art" is in private or institutional hands already so it's basically impossible to assemble.

Or even crazier, look at Toledo. That's a nothing city these days. But their art museum probably outranks that of Dallas, Atlanta or Miami. Or Buffalo, which has a better art museum than Toronto.
And yet those legacy institutions aren't making those cities economically powerful or getting people to visit their cities and move there. Who gets more visitors? Cleveland or Los Angeles? And the Getty is a pretty famous museum and probably visited a lot more than the Cleveland Museum of Art.
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Old 07-23-2016, 10:53 AM
 
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Yes and no.

In terms of amenities and everyday living, I think midsize cities have closed the gap. For most people, everyday life in midsize cities is pretty comparable to big cities. The big exception is urbanism, which only exists on a large scale in a few cities.

However, wealth and (to a smaller extent) people are concentrating in big cities. This is partly because in some industries, such as tech, law, and finance, the lucrative jobs are in fewer and fewer places. It's also because due to decreasing crime in cities and other trends, more people want to live in big cities.

p.s. - LA has some pretty great art museums: the Getty, LACMA, the Broad. I think it's a better art museum city than Cleveland at this point.
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