U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-23-2016, 11:31 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,278,660 times
Reputation: 9847

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
The study is a decade old
Yes, and?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-23-2016, 11:33 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,278,660 times
Reputation: 9847
Quote:
Originally Posted by ayoskillz View Post
I disagree. It depends where you live at. I use to live in new haven ct which its city of 125k and the exposure to different cultures is crazy for a city its size. I know being closeto nyc has something to do with it but its still a small town with alot of flavor. Also lived in charleston sc population is around the same and they have just as many restaurants as a big city.

I think again its just what city you are in. Some cities dont have that it factor and are just bland of any culture
New Haven is a commuter train trip from Manhattan. It's part of the NYC CSA.

Yeah, there's lots of culture in the region, but New Haven's relative population is pretty much irrelevant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2016, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Raccoon City
814 posts, read 1,074,429 times
Reputation: 1312
I think there is a gap still, but it comes down to individual cities. In newer large cities (like those in the Sun Belt), I don't think the gap is as large in terms of cultural institutions. I'm thinking of some place like my hometown of Kansas City versus Dallas. The museums, food, and general cultural activity does not seem to be that far apart. However, Dallas pulls ahead in the amount of oppurtunity for careers as well as accesses to better resources such as larger airports for traveling and a much larger variety of shopping options.

However, now I live in Chicago which steamrolls a lot of mid-sized cities and newer large metros in terms of offerings. What someone was saying earlier about the culture amassed during the legacy cities' reign throughout the late 1800's and twentieth century was true. Chicago has these amazing museums, top universities, large a wonderful variety of architecture, a mass transit system, walkability due to better urban design from a previous era, etc. And these older cities like Chicago, New York, Boston and Philadelphia provide a level of unmatched urbanism that puts you in contact with all walks of life everyday as you wander the streets, ride the subways, go downtown for a little shopping. It makes the diversity obvious and almost unavoidable for city dwellers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2016, 10:21 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,135 posts, read 4,165,633 times
Reputation: 7755
Yes and no. In terms of amenities offered, midsized cities have come a long way (though they still are a long way off from large cities). I would say there are still significant cultural differences between midsized cities and large cities, even if many of the services available in large cities can now be found in midsized cities. I also don't really think size is the best indicator. Detroit is larger than Seattle, but few would argue that Seattle is the superior city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2016, 02:22 PM
 
7,747 posts, read 4,600,400 times
Reputation: 8470
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
New Haven is a commuter train trip from Manhattan. It's part of the NYC CSA.

Yeah, there's lots of culture in the region, but New Haven's relative population is pretty much irrelevant.
No. New Haven if vibrant and dynamic because it has one of our best research universities. It's two hours from NYC. Yale makes it what it is.

I've never met such a CSA booster. I'm convinced you live 90 minutes outside of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2016, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,657 posts, read 4,613,721 times
Reputation: 2573
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Yes and no. In terms of amenities offered, midsized cities have come a long way (though they still are a long way off from large cities). I would say there are still significant cultural differences between midsized cities and large cities, even if many of the services available in large cities can now be found in midsized cities. I also don't really think size is the best indicator. Detroit is larger than Seattle, but few would argue that Seattle is the superior city.
In terms of metro? Seattle is doing very well right now but superior to metro Detroit it is not.

Quote:
And yet those legacy institutions aren't making those cities economically powerful or getting people to visit their cities and move there. Who gets more visitors? Cleveland or Los Angeles? And the Getty is a pretty famous museum and probably visited a lot more than the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Huh? most people who visit institutions like museums and stuff are tourist. Plenty of tourist come to cities to visit things like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2016, 06:18 PM
 
4,520 posts, read 2,693,730 times
Reputation: 4134
If you want density, transit usage, etc., Seattle is on a different planet from Detroit or its metro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2016, 06:49 AM
 
56,843 posts, read 81,169,050 times
Reputation: 12565
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
The thing is the people who created all those institutions were like crazy Rich. For example everything in Pittsburgh is due to Andrew Carnegie, for Cleveland, John D Rockefeller. He was like Bill Gates Rich. Places out west or down south that at some point had a mega-wealthy person or 2 do have cultural institutions on par with the old Northern Cities, think San Francisco, Seattle, Atlanta.
On the other hand Buffalo, which was once the 10th largest City in the country doesn't have any of the legacy Cultural institutions because despite being large, they didn't have a mega-rich industrialist like other large Rustbelt cities. Even Places like Rochester, NY trace their major Theatres, Museums, Orchestra etc. to basically the owners of Kodak and the owners of Xerox, Mega-Rich industrialists.
Buffalo has Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Kleinhans Music Hall, Shea's Theater in its Theater District and other long time institutions. Many cities that developed earlier tend to have some degree of long time, established institutions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2016, 07:10 AM
 
56,843 posts, read 81,169,050 times
Reputation: 12565
Quote:
Originally Posted by ayoskillz View Post
I disagree. It depends where you live at. I use to live in new haven ct which its city of 125k and the exposure to different cultures is crazy for a city its size. I know being closeto nyc has something to do with it but its still a small town with alot of flavor. Also lived in charleston sc population is around the same and they have just as many restaurants as a big city.

I think again its just what city you are in. Some cities dont have that it factor and are just bland of any culture
I agree. You can find your share of culture in quite a few mid and even small sized Northeastern cities. I think a part of this is due to people being priced out of the major Northeastern cities and wanting a little bit slower pace of life. There are other factors such as world renown higher education institutions, some being immigrant/refugee resettlement locations, being former industrial hubs and even old money institutions. Even a small city like Binghamton NY has an Opera, an Orchestra and the Roberson Museum all likely due to the legacy of IBM and Endicott-Johnson; as well as a high level state university and is an increasingly diverse city/area partially due to being a refugee hub. So, it can depend on the city/area itself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2016, 12:24 AM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,580 posts, read 2,599,309 times
Reputation: 3006
No way, big cities are stronger than ever. Though a lot of good things are happening in mid sizes metros.

If one does not require life in a major city, there are lota of good mid sized places to consider. Assuming you can adjust to the loc weather/culture.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top