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Old 07-26-2016, 06:29 PM
 
9,408 posts, read 9,569,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
Mid-sized cities are nice but they can be a bit annoying sometimes with "proving" how great they are. Example, #1 per capita in basically everything. Most of them are like this to an extent, although some significantly more than others. Also, the yuppies in mid-sized cities are paradoxically more stuck up than those in large cities.

I personally prefer small towns & very large cities.
I think that a few up and coming cities feel like they have something to prove, or people think of them as if it is still 1985.
So places like Charlotte have doubled in size since 1990, however many people see them as small southern towns, when they are mid-sized cities.
That is why Atlanta wanted the 1996 Olympics so bad, they wanted to prove they were more Boston than Birmingham.
It is why Buffalo had in 1900 worlds Fair, Seattle had its in the 1960's.
Its why the Empire State Building was Built, and the Original Penn Station, NY wanted to prove to the world it was just like London and Paris and Berlin.
Every City that comes onto the scene, no matter the era wants to prove itself to the big dogs, its not new.
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Old 07-27-2016, 02:40 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I'm not a "CSA booster". The fact is that this is part of the NYC metro area. Argue with the Census if you don't like official Census business rules.
Only if you're defining metro area as CSA is New Haven part of the NYC metro area. The CSA definitions are extremely broad, IMO.
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Old 07-30-2016, 05:46 AM
 
6,274 posts, read 10,039,921 times
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The reality in many midsized cities exceeds what is expected from them. Jobs in finance is one example in particular...

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranci...lotte-wfc.html.

Wells Fargo moving 120 Phila jobs to N. Carolina

Air travel is another example...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List..._United_States
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Old 07-30-2016, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,835,875 times
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Why do people think restaurants are the indicator of whether or not a person has been exposed to culture? A guy up in a cabin in the mountains can go online to find any recipe and make a dish. There are millions of cooking demonstration videos online that he could follow. He can even order the ingredients online.

The majority of jobs and population here is based around the hospitals and colleges. If we didn't have them, then this city would be screwed.

As far as sporting events, I have found the smaller leagues to be more fun, accessible, and affordable.

Last edited by bluecarebear; 07-30-2016 at 06:52 AM..
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Old 07-30-2016, 08:00 AM
 
7,746 posts, read 4,595,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Why do people think restaurants are the indicator of whether or not a person has been exposed to culture? A guy up in a cabin in the mountains can go online to find any recipe and make a dish. There are millions of cooking demonstration videos online that he could follow. He can even order the ingredients online.

The majority of jobs and population here is based around the hospitals and colleges. If we didn't have them, then this city would be screwed.

As far as sporting events, I have found the smaller leagues to be more fun, accessible, and affordable.
So you're dismissing the impact of restaurant scene, world class universities, hospitals and pro sports. Your Pittsburgh trolling knows no end. Why don't you leave the Pittsburgh exurbs and go live 45 minutes outside of some other city?
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Old 07-30-2016, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,876,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
The gap between amenities offered in the midsize cities and big cities is probably smaller now than it has been at any time since the 50s. Thanks to the instant dissemination of culture made possible by the Internet, there's very little cultural lag time either. What's cutting-edge in NY and LA is available to people in Portland and Milwaukee, now.

That is not to say the big cities don't offer much more, but the gap is substantially smaller than a lot of people want to believe…especially older people who haven't come to terms with the new reality.
What classifies as mid-sized and are we talking about metro, or city-proper?
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Old 07-30-2016, 03:16 PM
 
4,500 posts, read 2,688,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
The reality in many midsized cities exceeds what is expected from them. Jobs in finance is one example in particular...

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranci...lotte-wfc.html.

Wells Fargo moving 120 Phila jobs to N. Carolina

Air travel is another example...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List..._United_States
Back office jobs are exactly what I'd expect from a cheaper "mid major" city. Particularly one that has a background in the same industry. And aren't there a lot of former banking people in Charlotte due to the bust, perhaps looking to get back into similar work?
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Old 07-30-2016, 04:12 PM
 
6,274 posts, read 10,039,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Back office jobs are exactly what I'd expect from a cheaper "mid major" city. Particularly one that has a background in the same industry. And aren't there a lot of former banking people in Charlotte due to the bust, perhaps looking to get back into similar work?
Believe it or not, there are investment bankers in Charlotte earning well above $100k annually. These folks are fueling the apartment growth in Charlotte's downtown area. One of the tallest residential towers between Atlanta and NYC is actually located in Charlotte (The Vue is that tower's name). The Vue is 51 floors and has studios starting at $1,700/month. A decent sized 1 bedroom there is around $1,900-2,500/month.

Though Charlotte IS NOT NYC, Boston, Philly, Miami, or Atlanta. Charlotte (and many other mid sized cities) is a place where people can live in a high rise if they wanted to. People in Charlotte, Portland, and Denver can commute to work by train. People in some mid sized cities don't need a "big city" for a direct international flight. Heck, Denver and Charlotte hosted the last two Democratic National Conventions. The so called "big cities" no longer hold a monopoly on everything the way that they did 30-50 years ago.
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Old 07-30-2016, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,835,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
So you're dismissing the impact of restaurant scene, world class universities, hospitals and pro sports. Your Pittsburgh trolling knows no end. Why don't you leave the Pittsburgh exurbs and go live 45 minutes outside of some other city?
I know you think life stops at the Pittsburgh city border but it doesn't. There are plenty of great places outside of the city, Mt. Lebanon for example. I can't help it if you don't like the burbs. The fact is a city core isn't necessary. We are reverting back to the popularity of the suburbs. Census info reflects the switch.
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Old 07-30-2016, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
559 posts, read 318,598 times
Reputation: 838
The gap is closing in some ways. Employment opportunities are better in NYC and SF than Cleveland or Pittsburgh. But the latter affords me a downtown apartment in the theater district for under $2k a month. And the downtowns of Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and the like actually have quite a bit of nightlife, unique theater, unique eats, unique waterfront, etc. I can take a train to the museums, the orchestra, the hospitals, the market, the airport. Not too shabby.
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