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Old 07-30-2016, 06:21 PM
 
1,291 posts, read 1,125,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I know you think life stops at the Pittsburgh city border but it doesn't. There are plenty of great places outside of the city, Mt. Lebanon for example. I can't help it if you don't like the burbs. The fact is a city core isn't necessary. We are reverting back to the popularity of the suburbs. Census info reflects the switch.
Haven't core city densities been increasing for years.

Last edited by mr roboto; 07-30-2016 at 06:30 PM..
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Old 07-30-2016, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,029 posts, read 2,464,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Yes and no. In terms of amenities offered, midsized cities have come a long way (though they still are a long way off from large cities). I would say there are still significant cultural differences between midsized cities and large cities, even if many of the services available in large cities can now be found in midsized cities. I also don't really think size is the best indicator. Detroit is larger than Seattle, but few would argue that Seattle is the superior city.
FYI, I'd be very cautious with that statement, particular with metro areas. Both Detroit and Seattle are considered Beta Minus world cities, and people frequently underestimate the amount of research and development that happens in metro Detroit.
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Old 07-30-2016, 09:00 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,672,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Believe it or not, there are investment bankers in Charlotte earning well above $100k annually. These folks are fueling the apartment growth in Charlotte's downtown area. One of the tallest residential towers between Atlanta and NYC is actually located in Charlotte (The Vue is that tower's name). The Vue is 51 floors and has studios starting at $1,700/month. A decent sized 1 bedroom there is around $1,900-2,500/month.
Not sure what your point is. My post was about back office jobs being pretty standard for a cheaper city, and you haven't addressed that at all (except by posting evidence that Charlotte is actually pretty cheap vs. the coastal banking centers).
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Old 07-31-2016, 12:07 AM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,026,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Not sure what your point is. My post was about back office jobs being pretty standard for a cheaper city, and you haven't addressed that at all (except by posting evidence that Charlotte is actually pretty cheap vs. the coastal banking centers).
Honestly, there was nothing to address. Charlotte's rise (especially downtown) had nothing to do with "back office" jobs and eveything to do with bank CEOs calling Charlotte home. Even today, if you did a google search for "Bank of America's Corporate Headquarters" you'd see it's in Charlotte.
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Old 07-31-2016, 06:42 AM
 
7,706 posts, read 4,569,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I know you think life stops at the Pittsburgh city border but it doesn't. There are plenty of great places outside of the city, Mt. Lebanon for example. I can't help it if you don't like the burbs. The fact is a city core isn't necessary. We are reverting back to the popularity of the suburbs. Census info reflects the switch.
Mt Lebanon is a first-ring, streetcar suburb of a city with a land area of 55 square miles. In any other metro, save for Boston, it would have been annexed decades ago. It exists specifically because Pittsburgh exists. It's essentially a parasite. It's residents use the city's resources and give nothing back. Find a better example of smaller cities closing the gap.
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Haven't core city densities been increasing for years.
Not in Pittsburgh and many other cities. Burb and small city growth is gaining again.

Urbanization has mostly meant growth in suburbs, not center cities.
Population Surge in Cities Eases as Jobs Shift and Suburbs Call - WSJ
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Old 07-31-2016, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,828,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Mt Lebanon is a first-ring, streetcar suburb of a city with a land area of 55 square miles. In any other metro, save for Boston, it would have been annexed decades ago. It exists specifically because Pittsburgh exists. It's essentially a parasite. It's residents use the city's resources and give nothing back. Find a better example of smaller cities closing the gap.
Yes, a suburb. I know people who found jobs outside of the city core and will not come back in to the city of Pittsburgh. Possibly for a game but that is it.
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Old 07-31-2016, 10:05 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,254,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Honestly, there was nothing to address. Charlotte's rise (especially downtown) had nothing to do with "back office" jobs and eveything to do with bank CEOs calling Charlotte home. Even today, if you did a google search for "Bank of America's Corporate Headquarters" you'd see it's in Charlotte.
But BofA's CEO's aren't in Charlotte; they're in NYC. BofA is basically run out of One Bryant Park in Times Square. HQ will always be Charlotte, but that's not where leadership resides.
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Old 07-31-2016, 12:51 PM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,026,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But BofA's CEO's aren't in Charlotte; they're in NYC. BofA is basically run out of One Bryant Park in Times Square. HQ will always be Charlotte, but that's not where leadership resides.
This is true since the great recession, but it still doesn't change the fact that Charlotte was built because it was a corporate HQ. Billions of dollars in high rise class A office space was not built downtown to house back office labor. The decision to invest heavily in Charlotte's real estate, performing arts centers, sporting venues etc was due to the fact that CEOs and senior management resided in Charlotte.

Today, Charlotte isn't the senior management home it once was, but the investments from those days are still here. Banks are not the ones building skyscrapers in Charlotte any more. However, private real estate developers are, and it was Charlotte's corporate center days that kick-started all of the activity we're seeing today.

Also, there are still many 6 figure finance jobs in the downtown area. As a result, high rise apartments are being built in record numbers (by NC standards). Had Charlotte never been a major corporate center, I'm certain none of the downtown real estate projects we see today would exist.

The irony is that Charlotte had more fortune 500 HQs 10 years ago than it has now (and Charlotte's metro added 500,000 people in the last 10 years).
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Old 07-31-2016, 01:00 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,672,469 times
Reputation: 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Honestly, there was nothing to address. Charlotte's rise (especially downtown) had nothing to do with "back office" jobs and eveything to do with bank CEOs calling Charlotte home. Even today, if you did a google search for "Bank of America's Corporate Headquarters" you'd see it's in Charlotte.
Again, not relevant to my post, which was about processing centers.
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