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Old 07-23-2016, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,335 posts, read 3,151,380 times
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I will use me as an example. I am a mix of a few European ethnicities, Scottish being the main player along with Swedish, Dutch, and Italian (in this order).

I live in the desert of Tucson and Glendale, Arizona which is a climate that is not replicated in Europe but is replicated in the nearby Sahara. The heat of the desert has never been something I liked or desired. I love cloudy, rainy days (I thrive when they happen here, just see my other posts regarding our monsoon season) and I like cold weather as well.

I haven't been to many places internationally but I have been all over Italy and I felt Italy was rather humid for me, and my family members are from the Naples/Capri area. Naples has a Mediterranean climate classification of Csa, which is similar to Southern California. Barcelona is a dry climate of the same classification, which I felt was nice but I would like it to be cooler.

I have living family members and other extended family from southern Sweden near Stockholm. The Stockholm/Southern Sweden area has a Dfb classification, humid continental climate, that in our country shares with Fargo, North Dakota and Concord, New Hampshire. Fargo has average highs of the low 80s in the summer and average highs of the low 20s in the winter. Fargo also hovers around 60% humidity and gets about 50 inches of snowfall a year. Concord on the other hand, has average highs of the low 80s in the summer and average highs of the low 30s in the winter, is about 10% more humid and gets 60 inches of snowfall a year. Stockholm is slightly cooler with average highs of low 70s in the summer and and average highs of low 30s in the winter. I like the summer highs that are observed in Fargo and Concord, but the winter highs of Concord and Stockholm (Sweden is warmer than North Dakota, awkward). Though while in theory looking at the data these climates look tolerable to me, I have heard of Stockholm from my family and North Dakota being rather extreme in the winter, which makes me hesitate to say that I would like it.

Now, the Netherlands and the entire UK share the same climate which is Cfb, or oceanic. They are both pretty rainy. Now while the Pacific Northwest is close to oceanic, Seattle and Portland are actually closer to California's Csa climate (as a Csb) rather than the Cfb classification (in this case of Seattle and Portland, summers are too dry to be Cfb). Places in the US that fit this classification are Ketchikan, Alaska and Forks, Washington. I have ancestral ties to Edinburgh, Scotland the most out of anywhere else. Edinburgh gets pretty cold, highs in the 60s and mid-40s through out the year with over 27 inches of rainfall. Now I have actually been to Ketchikan, with the same summer highs and slightly cooler winters (high 30s) and 153.24 inches of rainfall I remember the captain joking about how it was the one sunny day Ketchikan gets a year, but I enjoyed my time there and enjoyed the weather along with the greenery. Now Forks on the other hand has highs in the low-70s and mid-40s with 119 inches of rainfall. I find Edinburgh to be ideal except I wish it got warmer in the summer, Forks and Ketchikan are significantly more rainy for some reason which, even though I love rainy days, might be too much.

So TL;DR ironically the place that I have the most ancestral ties to, Scotland, is ideally the climate I would like the most to live in. It has a lot of cloudy and rainy days but not too much, and doesn't get too hot but also isn't Antarctica either in the winter time. I could go for a bit warmer than Scotland, which can be seen in Forks, Washington. Scotland nor Forks, WA is anything like where I live now, which weather-wise I dislike a lot of the time.

Do you think this is true for most people? That someone from say, mostly Egypt, would prefer a desert climate? That someone from Indonesia would prefer a tropical climate? And et cetera? Is it true for you?
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Old 07-23-2016, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,411,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I will use me as an example. I am a mix of a few European ethnicities, Scottish being the main player along with Swedish, Dutch, and Italian (in this order).

I live in the desert of Tucson and Glendale, Arizona which is a climate that is not replicated in Europe but is replicated in the nearby Sahara. The heat of the desert has never been something I liked or desired. I love cloudy, rainy days (I thrive when they happen here, just see my other posts regarding our monsoon season) and I like cold weather as well.

I haven't been to many places internationally but I have been all over Italy and I felt Italy was rather humid for me, and my family members are from the Naples/Capri area. Naples has a Mediterranean climate classification of Csa, which is similar to Southern California. Barcelona is a dry climate of the same classification, which I felt was nice but I would like it to be cooler.

I have living family members and other extended family from southern Sweden near Stockholm. The Stockholm/Southern Sweden area has a Dfb classification, humid continental climate, that in our country shares with Fargo, North Dakota and Concord, New Hampshire. Fargo has average highs of the low 80s in the summer and average highs of the low 20s in the winter. Fargo also hovers around 60% humidity and gets about 50 inches of snowfall a year. Concord on the other hand, has average highs of the low 80s in the summer and average highs of the low 30s in the winter, is about 10% more humid and gets 60 inches of snowfall a year. Stockholm is slightly cooler with average highs of low 70s in the summer and and average highs of low 30s in the winter. I like the summer highs that are observed in Fargo and Concord, but the winter highs of Concord and Stockholm (Sweden is warmer than North Dakota, awkward). Though while in theory looking at the data these climates look tolerable to me, I have heard of Stockholm from my family and North Dakota being rather extreme in the winter, which makes me hesitate to say that I would like it.

Now, the Netherlands and the entire UK share the same climate which is Cfb, or oceanic. They are both pretty rainy. Now while the Pacific Northwest is close to oceanic, Seattle and Portland are actually closer to California's Csa climate (as a Csb) rather than the Cfb classification (in this case of Seattle and Portland, summers are too dry to be Cfb). Places in the US that fit this classification are Ketchikan, Alaska and Forks, Washington. I have ancestral ties to Edinburgh, Scotland the most out of anywhere else. Edinburgh gets pretty cold, highs in the 60s and mid-40s through out the year with over 27 inches of rainfall. Now I have actually been to Ketchikan, with the same summer highs and slightly cooler winters (high 30s) and 153.24 inches of rainfall I remember the captain joking about how it was the one sunny day Ketchikan gets a year, but I enjoyed my time there and enjoyed the weather along with the greenery. Now Forks on the other hand has highs in the low-70s and mid-40s with 119 inches of rainfall. I find Edinburgh to be ideal except I wish it got warmer in the summer, Forks and Ketchikan are significantly more rainy for some reason which, even though I love rainy days, might be too much.

So TL;DR ironically the place that I have the most ancestral ties to, Scotland, is ideally the climate I would like the most to live in. It has a lot of cloudy and rainy days but not too much, and doesn't get too hot but also isn't Antarctica either in the winter time. I could go for a bit warmer than Scotland, which can be seen in Forks, Washington. Scotland nor Forks, WA is anything like where I live now, which weather-wise I dislike a lot of the time.

Do you think this is true for most people? That someone from say, mostly Egypt, would prefer a desert climate? That someone from Indonesia would prefer a tropical climate? And et cetera? Is it true for you?
I don't think so, most of my family is from Eastern Europe with a cold Oceanic climate, and I NEED warm-hot, but dry, weather and sunshine
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Old 07-23-2016, 09:42 PM
 
551 posts, read 658,345 times
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This seems like it could really quickly devolve into a "and that's why you never see blacks in Maine!" type thread. Touchy subject to say the least.
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Old 07-23-2016, 10:26 PM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
1,112 posts, read 1,782,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessoftheCape View Post
This seems like it could really quickly devolve into a "and that's why you never see blacks in Maine!" type thread. Touchy subject to say the least.
LOL

Some people like to play it up just to enhance their ethnic identity, i.e. "I'm pale Irish so I belong in Seattle." Truth is, a freckly redhead could survive just fine in Arizona. If they managed to get an adequate supply of Omega-3s, they wouldn't even need sunscreen.
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Old 07-23-2016, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,335 posts, read 3,151,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skidamarink View Post
LOL

Some people like to play it up just to enhance their ethnic identity, i.e. "I'm pale Irish so I belong in Seattle." Truth is, a freckly redhead could survive just fine in Arizona. If they managed to get an adequate supply of Omega-3s, they wouldn't even need sunscreen.
If you're really pale you'd probably burn all the time, that's just a reality for people who are very white. I'm fortunate enough that I tan and don't need to apply sunscreen nearly every day like a few of my family members. My grandfather who has some severe burns has gotten skin cancer more than ten times and has to completely cover most of his body living here because of the burns when he goes outside. And he got those really bad burns from his childhood in Pennsylvania, not even here. He's one of the most pale people I know. That skin cancer removal has cost him a lot of cash that would have happened less often (honestly his burns would have probably given him skin cancer anyway) if he lived somewhere that wasn't sunny Arizona.

Of course a freckly red head would do fine here if they give themselves enough sunscreen when they need it, I just thought I asked a legitimate question on whether or not it could influence climates you enjoy. Not that if you're black you'd hate Maine, or other kinds of nonsense. A simple "no, this is stupid" would suffice. I mentioned myself only as an example, I almost never go into detail about my ethnicities because I find it irrelevant except in this thread.

And no, you'd still burn here as a ginger regardless of omega-3s. Have you ever been here? The sun in the desert is intense, everyone knows that.
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Old 07-24-2016, 01:16 AM
 
972 posts, read 683,224 times
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Okay so at first I thought that was a weird question. I then stated to think about it and I think you could be right. I mean most white people I know love the forest not all but a lot like to go and visit the forest. Where did white people come from? Europe which is forest. Then when I go hiking which I do frequently I only see white people. Like by far most people are white, I don't think I've ever seen a black family hiking. Maybe rarely I see a black guy with a bunch of white friendly hiking in the forest so idk maybe you right.

Another weird thing is white people being liberals. Most white countries are relatively liberal, have legalize gay marriage, lots of freedoms, etc. And the countries are the way they are cause the people that are there. The most liberal counties are white countries. Hippies are like invented by white propel. White countries give the most in aid to other countries. White people seem to be relatively liberal and have a live and let live type mindset, maybe it's just those "evil" western ways. I'm saying to this to suggest that maybe genetics somehow does have a bigger part of you than just your body?

Last edited by Seattle4321; 07-24-2016 at 01:33 AM..
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Old 07-24-2016, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,798,753 times
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I'm descended from Vikings and arctic nomad reindeer herders and I think cold weather is the devil. I spent all my adult life in California, deserts are my preferred environment, and I live in subtropical Asia. I know a lot of black or Latin American/Caribbean folks back in the Northeast who love winter time and snow and can't imagine life without it...

Now, how my body handles it is another matter entirely. I sweat in humidity so I'm always chugging water. I get tired more easily. In dry heat it's no problem, but here I need AC, much to my wife's dismay. I can handle cold just fine, but it pisses me off and makes me miserable.
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Old 07-24-2016, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,335 posts, read 3,151,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle4321 View Post
Okay so at first I thought that was a weird question. I then stated to think about it and I think you could be right. I mean most white people I know love the forest not all but a lot like to go and visit the forest. Where did white people come from? Europe which is forest. Then when I go hiking which I do frequently I only see white people. Like by far most people are white, I don't think I've ever seen a black family hiking. Maybe rarely I see a black guy with a bunch of white friendly hiking in the forest so idk maybe you right.

Another weird thing is white people being liberals. Most white countries are relatively liberal, have legalize gay marriage, lots of freedoms, etc. And the countries are the way they are cause the people that are there. White countries give the most in aid to other countries. White people seem to be relatively liberal and have a live and let live type mindset, maybe it's just those "evil" western ways.
Isn't Seattle one of the most vanilla places in this country? Maybe that's why you don't see African-Americans go hiking... Hiking isn't exclusive to a forest either, you can do that here in the desert and in many other places.

I'm not going to address your second paragraph because this has nothing to do with politics.
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Old 07-24-2016, 01:31 AM
 
972 posts, read 683,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Isn't Seattle one of the most vanilla places in this country? Maybe that's why you don't see African-Americans go hiking... Hiking isn't exclusive to a forest either, you can do that here in the desert and in many other places.

I'm not going to address your second paragraph because this has nothing to do with politics.
Seattle city is pretty white but once you leave the city the metro really isn't really white. I see black people everywhere I go in the metro area. Maybe not a ton of them but I will see a few everywhere I go. Hiking I like basically never see them. And most white people seem to prefere the forest, at least the ones I know.
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Old 07-24-2016, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,335 posts, read 3,151,380 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
I'm descended from Vikings and arctic nomad reindeer herders and I think cold weather is the devil. I spent all my adult life in California, deserts are my preferred environment, and I live in subtropical Asia. I know a lot of black or Latin American/Caribbean folks back in the Northeast who love winter time and snow and can't imagine life without it...

Now, how my body handles it is another matter entirely. I sweat in humidity so I'm always chugging water. I get tired more easily. In dry heat it's no problem, but here I need AC, much to my wife's dismay. I can handle cold just fine, but it pisses me off and makes me miserable.
Well that's how I am towards heat, I turn grumpy. But if I had to walk five miles at 4 pm tomorrow I could do it, after a while the heat just doesn't bug you anymore until the heat that had been increasing in your car comes flying out at you when you open your car door. Driving is almost worse than walking here until your AC finally kicks in and gets your car to a normal temperature.

Yes people of all races can thrive anywhere in terms of climate. Like my borderline-albino grandfather who gets skin cancer all the time wouldn't trade Arizona for the world. But I just thought maybe it could influence the climates that one likes. Could being the key term, not always.

Humans originally came from western Ethiopia and if I recall correctly that part of Ethiopia actually has a Mediterranean climate which would reflect where you grew up. Eventually we branched out of Ethiopia to many other places, and for most places we had to cross the brutal Sahara to get to them. So humans are meant to adapt and handle and thrive in all types of climates, but this is to address preference.
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