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Old 07-27-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,110 posts, read 2,150,211 times
Reputation: 3604

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoBlueA2 View Post
Thank you for the insight. I read that Denver's snow does not stay on the ground long. It said the sun comes out and it melts off rather quickly compared to being on the ground for days or weeks at a time like in Michigan. Is that not the case?
Yes and no. In most cases and in most areas, a small snow storm will have the snow melt within a day or two. However, if the accumulation is significant (Alq low or Arctic blizzard), we get a low pressure cell that keeps temps down for an extended period of time, any of the snow that is in shady areas, or snow that has been pounded into ice by traffic, and it can stick around for more than a few weeks.

Keep in mind that winter temps can range between 0*f to 60*f and we can get sudden blizzards from October to May. Certainly at the beginning or end of winter snow disappears much more quickly, but there can be periods in the heart of winter where snow sticks around for several weeks.

However, you will not find 10-15' high mounds of dirty snow sitting in parking lots from December to March, so while it doesn't stick around like Michigan, but we are not exempt from getting piled on occasionally.
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Old 07-27-2016, 07:57 AM
 
2,732 posts, read 5,174,500 times
Reputation: 1969
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Have you ever been to Salt Lake? If you had, you would know that it is actually pretty green. Thanks to orographic lift from the Wasatch Mountains, they get over 20" of precip/year, so they are technically semi-arid, but still green, like Sacramento, the Desert doesn't start in northern UT unril about 40-50 miles west of Downtown SLC.

And to your other point, everywhere has mosquitos
I actually lived in Salt Lake for a number of years. The city is green because man makes it look green during the warm months. The area as you said is semi arid, the location the city is built was a desert until lawns and trees were planted and is part of the Great Basin Desert. The natural desert (what man has not made green) begins just outside of city limits and that is especially evident when travelling towards the airport which is much closer then 40-50 miles west.

Citizens of Salt Lake over in the Utah/SLC forums will also inform people questioning about the location that the area is indeed a desert and brownish most of the year. There is nothing wrong with that, most large cities in the Intermountain West are very similar in this regard.

Of the states the OP mentioned, Washington and Idaho will offer the greenest environment, especially North Idaho.

Last edited by Syringaloid; 07-27-2016 at 08:08 AM..
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Old 07-27-2016, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,110 posts, read 2,150,211 times
Reputation: 3604
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Have you ever been to Salt Lake? If you had, you would know that it is actually pretty green. Thanks to orographic lift from the Wasatch Mountains, they get over 20" of precip/year, so they are technically semi-arid, but still green, like Sacramento, the Desert doesn't start in northern UT unril about 40-50 miles west of Downtown SLC.

And to your other point, everywhere has mosquitos
To me, the green of the Rockies is much different than than the green of the Cascades. The Cascades will be more like the Michigan green the OP is accustomed to. Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, etc will all have a darker pine green in the mountains with a pale, almost bleached out green of the native grasses in most areas.
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Old 07-29-2016, 08:10 AM
 
67 posts, read 48,009 times
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Thank you all. Your input has been quite helpful!
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Old 07-29-2016, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,924 posts, read 6,950,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McdonaldIndy View Post
Go south to Columbus or Indianapolis. Removes the lake effect snow and as a result 80% less snow and 10-15 degrees warmer in the winter.
Actually, January in Indy and Columbus is only 5 degrees warmer than in Cleveland or even Rochester. For that kind of a warm up, you have to go down to Nashville
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