U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-01-2016, 02:09 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500

Advertisements

Parts of the Hudson Valley cities/towns in NY like Newburgh, Kingston and Hudson have areas with row houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-01-2016, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
679 posts, read 463,710 times
Reputation: 938
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Providence is probably up there, it has almost 10,000 ppsm. Federal Hill, Downcity, College Hill etc are all very urban. And even outside of the 18 sq miles, Pawtucket and Central Falls both have densities over 7,000 ppsm, and Pawtucket has a pretty cohesive town center.
I agree .. Providence is pretty urban and dense for a small city ... it's like a scaled down version of
Boston .. even has the crazy street disign lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2016, 06:01 PM
 
781 posts, read 1,094,315 times
Reputation: 609
Wheeling WV, Richmond VA, Alexandria VA and Norfolk Va
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2016, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,054,090 times
Reputation: 3925
Savannah is extremely urban for its size, at least in the Historic and Victorian districts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2016, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Parts of the Hudson Valley cities/towns in NY like Newburgh, Kingston and Hudson have areas with row houses.
As we've talked about in other threads however, it's odd how quickly rowhouses vanish in Upstate NY once you get west of the Hudson Valley. None north of Saratoga Springs, AFAIK either. I suppose it's just because the outer portions of Upstate were settled by Yankees, who weren't keen on rowhouses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2016, 06:37 AM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
As we've talked about in other threads however, it's odd how quickly rowhouses vanish in Upstate NY once you get west of the Hudson Valley. None north of Saratoga Springs, AFAIK either. I suppose it's just because the outer portions of Upstate were settled by Yankees, who weren't keen on rowhouses.
Outside of Geneva's South Main Street and some in Syracuse's Hawley-Green neighborhood, you would be hard pressed to find any other rowhouses in Upstate NY. Welcome to South Main Street, Geneva
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tGswej8vbw
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_...neva,_New_York)


https://www.google.com/maps/@42.8637...7i13312!8i6656






Welcome to the District of Hawley-Green!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawley...toric_District
Hawley-Green
NEHDA
Everything Else


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ha...3!4d-76.133251

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0546...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0538...7i13312!8i6656

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 08-02-2016 at 07:33 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2016, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,971,553 times
Reputation: 2742
Wilmington, Delaware is definitely on this list. We still have a density of ~7,000 ppsm despite having lost 1/3 of our peak population, and the city is still quite structurally dense, with plenty of one way streets and row home neighborhoods. Throw in our short, but dense skyline, and the city is quite urban feeling.













Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2016, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,188,030 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Wilmington, Delaware is definitely on this list. We still have a density of ~7,000 ppsm despite having lost 1/3 of our peak population, and the city is still quite structurally dense, with plenty of one way streets and row home neighborhoods. Throw in our short, but dense skyline, and the city is quite urban feeling.













Crime rate there is in top 5
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2016, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
There is a very geographically notable "rowhouse belt" in the Mid-Atlantic. It basically includes the following areas - at least in terms of 19th/very early 20th century urban areas:

NY: As noted, Hudson Valley ranging south to NYC.

NJ: Relatively little other than satellite cities of NYC (Hoboken, Jersey City) and Philly (Camden, Trenton, Collingswood). You can find rows elsewhere, like Atlantic City, but the typical 19th century vernacular in New Jersey are detached houses placed very, very close together.

PA: A large swathe of the east of the state. It's inclusive of all of the older cities and boroughs in the Philly suburbs. Also the Lehigh Valley (Easton, Bethlehem, and Allentown), Reading, and all of the South-Central PA cities (York, Harrisburg, Lancaster, Lebanon, Chambersburg, etc). In addition it travels a bit up into the mountains of the southern part of the coal region (Manahoy City, Shamokin, Pottsville, Jim Thorpe, etc). I've also found some outlier communities like Lewisburg and Renovo which have a lot of attached or semi-attached housing near their CBD. There's none in the northern tier of the state however, which includes the Wyoming Valley and Erie. There's also not much in western Pennsylvania besides Pittsburgh.

DE: Wilmington.

MD: I think that not only Baltimore, but all of the 19th century cities in Baltimore have a fair-sized contingent of rowhouses, barring Salisbury on the Eastern Shore.

VA: Many small cities in the norther half of Virginia, like Winschester and Fredricksburg, have some rowhouses. Alexandria and Richmond of course have them as well, and there are isolated examples in parts of Hampton Roads (Norfolk and Portsmouth). I believe there would be a great deal more in Virginia, except that urban renewal wiped out many of the old rowhouse neighborhoods during the 20th century, as the CBD expanded.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2016, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Seattle aka tier 3 city :)
1,078 posts, read 961,931 times
Reputation: 683
Definitely Seattle
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top