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Old 07-31-2016, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Discussions on this subforum of which city is the "most urban" tend to quite frequently boil down to discussions of either population density or the largest area of "intense" development. I am curious once you take out the heavy hitters which everyone seems to bring up, what people think the most urban midsized and smaller cities in the country are.

The only rule is that cities which functionally are an extension of a primary city's urban core (e.g., Cambridge or Hoboken) are discounted. Satellite cities within a core city's MSA can still be discussed.
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Old 07-31-2016, 02:18 PM
 
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Providence is probably up there, it has almost 10,000 ppsm. Federal Hill, Downcity, College Hill etc are all very urban. And even outside of the 18 sq miles, Pawtucket and Central Falls both have densities over 7,000 ppsm, and Pawtucket has a pretty cohesive town center.
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Old 07-31-2016, 08:17 PM
 
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What is the mid size limit? When we are talking about "urban" is this in terms of population density, built environment or both?

With this said, in terms of built environment the cities in the Albany-Schenectady-Troy area have areas if those cities with a very urban built environment.
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Old 07-31-2016, 08:23 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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The core of Annapolis is pretty dense. I didn't realize it until I went of a tour of the history of Annapolis.
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Old 07-31-2016, 09:26 PM
 
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New Orleans would certainly have to be in the discussion.
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Old 08-01-2016, 06:33 AM
 
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Smaller cities and boroughs in southern/eastern PA often have rowhouse density, even some places only a few blocks long. Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, Carlisle, Mahanoy City, Lykens, etc.

Cumberland, MD has a dense core. Oddly, despite scads of vacant development land around that economically challenged community, some still seem to propose gapping it out. https://saverollingmill.com/
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Old 08-01-2016, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
Smaller cities and boroughs in southern/eastern PA often have rowhouse density, even some places only a few blocks long. Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, Carlisle, Mahanoy City, Lykens, etc.
Yup. Basically everywhere in PA south of the Wyoming Valley and from Chambersburg east will have some rowhouses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
Cumberland, MD has a dense core. Oddly, despite scads of vacant development land around that economically challenged community, some still seem to propose gapping it out. https://saverollingmill.com/
Cumberland is pretty dense, but I feel like Hagerstown feels more urban overall. The core of Frederick is pretty full of rowhouses too, though the density drops to detached-single family houses more quickly.
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Old 08-01-2016, 11:28 AM
 
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Charleston WV may be a sleeper in terms of built environment.
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Old 08-01-2016, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Charleston WV may be a sleeper in terms of built environment.
Dunno about that. One of my good friends here is relocating to Charleston. The two most urban residential neighborhoods, are pretty classic streetcar suburbs. Basically a mixture of large detached single-family housing, some 2-4 unit homes, and a few midsize apartment buildings east of Downtown, and more modest housing west. There are a handful of rows closer in, but it seems like urban renewal destroyed any rowhouse neighborhoods Charleston had. Overall, it's not too different from what you can find in many midwestern U.S. cities - but much better admittedly than many southern cities.
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Old 08-01-2016, 12:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Dunno about that. One of my good friends here is relocating to Charleston. The two most urban residential neighborhoods, are pretty classic streetcar suburbs. Basically a mixture of large detached single-family housing, some 2-4 unit homes, and a few midsize apartment buildings east of Downtown, and more modest housing west. There are a handful of rows closer in, but it seems like urban renewal destroyed any rowhouse neighborhoods Charleston had. Overall, it's not too different from what you can find in many midwestern U.S. cities - but much better admittedly than many southern cities.
Admittedly, I was thinking in terms of its Downtown and the West Washington corridor on its West Side.
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