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Old 04-08-2017, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Poughkeepsie, New York
86 posts, read 65,394 times
Reputation: 115

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
The cities in the Northeast are uniform, while southern cities more diverse.
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Old 04-08-2017, 09:47 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,728 posts, read 6,134,571 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyNY View Post
If you disagree then you'd be able to prove that I'm wrong, right?
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Old 04-08-2017, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,379,700 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
It doesn't exist really. Across the Northeast corridor you could seemingly break down these many cultural regions:

New England
NYC metro
Delaware Valley
Tidewater

And then you could include little sub regions like South Jersey which is very different from Northeast Jersey and so on. Across this region the choo choo is what binds them together. But to say "well it's all the East Coast" ignores the different history between the cities that are part of the corridor. The history of Baltimore is very different from that of Boston and even from neighboring Philly. They really are there own unique individual places.

Their lingo is even different. Jawn is uniquely a Philly thing. Yo as a personal pronoun is really a Baltimore thing. What links them is possibly a history of colonialism, Catholicism, and English ethnicity (maybe). Structure wise they are different. Triple deckers are New England. Brownstones are NYC. Smaller rows reminiscent of England are Mid-Atlantic. Boston was settled by East Anglian Puritans, NYC originally by Dutch and later various English groups, Philadelphia by many Quakers, Baltimore by English Catholics. They were honestly different nations and today they don't seem to be that much more similar to each other. Baltimore doesn't get as international as the rest of the corridor for some reason.

They are similar but they are not.
Yo is actually a Philly word originally.
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Old 04-08-2017, 10:15 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,840,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Yo is actually a Philly word originally.
Yup but Baltimore took it and made it into a personal pronoun is my point.
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Old 04-08-2017, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Poughkeepsie, New York
86 posts, read 65,394 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
If you disagree then you'd be able to prove that I'm wrong, right?
It's not that I necessarily disagree, it's that you're comparing a census-defined region consisting of a total of nine states and a population of around 55,943,073 with a census-defined region consisting of a total of sixteen states and a population of around 114,555,744 people.

Of course there would be more diversity in southern cities, why wouldn't there be?

Compare and contrast (Sorry about the small first map)



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Old 04-09-2017, 05:02 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
Reputation: 14655
I do think there is a sort of "13 original colonies" culture that ties together the Northeastern and the South Atlantic states to a degree. Despite the cultural differences between the North and the South, there are still very subtle similarities between all 13 original colonies due to their shared historic significance. Basically, they all "grew up" together, at the same time, so they're all peers in that respect. The interior states grew up later.
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