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View Poll Results: Which cities in different regions are the most similar to you?
NYC-Chicago 12 24.00%
Baltimore-St. Louis 28 56.00%
Detroit-Los Angeles 3 6.00%
Other (Please explain why in a post) 9 18.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 50. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-14-2016, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Rochester NY
1,253 posts, read 825,898 times
Reputation: 2008

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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Certainly not your way. Your way excludes Louisiana from the real South which is the most ridiculous thing I've heard, as well as Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky all of which constitute the real South. Your way is certainly and factually incorrect.
Go back and read post #41, I included LA as part of the real South.

But there is not just one part of the South man. To group all those states into one region is absolutely ridiculous. There's the South Atlantic States, East South Central States, West South Central States, Southern Appalachia, Deep South, Gulf South, Upper South, and so many other ways to classify it.

But to group ALL of those states in the same region is just crazy. Oklahoma is nothing like Florida and Texas is nothing like Virginia. They are not in the same region. Sure, if the U.S. Census Bureau wants to classify it all as one region, fine, easier for them. But in an opinionated discussion like this I'd much rather group regions by geographic location, culture, and history instead of what some government agency has deemed a "region".

 
Old 08-14-2016, 03:20 PM
 
9,385 posts, read 9,548,809 times
Reputation: 5790
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
No they aren't. Maryland is NOT the South. The Census Bureau has it wrong. Anyone with an education knows Maryland is not the South. I know you believe it is but something tells me you just take the Mason Dixon as a hard boundary that can't be disputed. The argument for Maryland being Southern from a modern standpoint is very weak. Hence the argument is invalid. You can feel free to disagree but I'm not changing my tune. You in fact are wrong but you'll never admit it. Hence you're a waste of my time and energy.
Would you like to provide evidence or something, or are we just suppose to believe you?
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,163,750 times
Reputation: 4349
^gt, if that's the case then my vote goes to Charleston and Savannah as the two most similar cities in different regions.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:34 PM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,406,003 times
Reputation: 18529
Quote:
Originally Posted by gt87 View Post
Go back and read post #41, I included LA as part of the real South.

But there is not just one part of the South man. To group all those states into one region is absolutely ridiculous. There's the South Atlantic States, East South Central States, West South Central States, Southern Appalachia, Deep South, Gulf South, Upper South, and so many other ways to classify it.

But to group ALL of those states in the same region is just crazy. Oklahoma is nothing like Florida and Texas is nothing like Virginia. They are not in the same region. Sure, if the U.S. Census Bureau wants to classify it all as one region, fine, easier for them. But in an opinionated discussion like this I'd much rather group regions by geographic location, culture, and history instead of what some government agency has deemed a "region".
The South is an actual region based on geographic location, culture, and history; this is pretty easy to prove so let's not go to the other extreme. However, it can be argued that subregions are more relevant and several exist within the South (e.g., Gulf Coast, Piedmont, Lowcountry, Appalachia, etc.).

When speaking of regions, there are nuances to consider that go beyond the standard South/Northeast/Midwest/West designations.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Rochester NY
1,253 posts, read 825,898 times
Reputation: 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The South is an actual region based on geographic location, culture, and history; this is pretty easy to prove so let's not go to the other extreme. However, it can be argued that subregions are more relevant and several exist within the South (e.g., Gulf Coast, Piedmont, Lowcountry, Appalachia, etc.).

When speaking of regions, there are nuances to consider that go beyond the standard South/Northeast/Midwest/West designations.
Exactly, that's what I'm saying.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Rochester NY
1,253 posts, read 825,898 times
Reputation: 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
^gt, if that's the case then my vote goes to Charleston and Savannah as the two most similar cities in different regions.
But what region/sub-region could GA and SC not be considered the same?
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,163,750 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by gt87 View Post
But what region/sub-region could GA and SC not be considered the same?
States. In my opinion, different states should be seen as different regions. That way there's no confusion.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Rochester NY
1,253 posts, read 825,898 times
Reputation: 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
States. In my opinion, different states should be seen as different regions. That way there's no confusion.
Yep, I guess that's one way to look at it.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 05:07 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,916 posts, read 2,020,323 times
Reputation: 5880
Skimming through this thread, I didn't see this already, but two cities in different regions that have similarities to me are Birmingham, Alabama and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Both have a similar history as far as their economies being based around steel mills, both are considered fairly liberal compared to the much more conservative hinterlands in their respective states, both have risen from gritty industrial towns to revitalized, higher tech, higher skilled economies. Although not as pronounced as Pittsburgh, Birmingham even has quite a bit of Italian heritage.

Geographically, they aren't as similar, but it's difficult to find places that are comparable to Pittsburgh in that regard that have even a semblance of the same feel.
 
Old 08-14-2016, 10:20 PM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,406,003 times
Reputation: 18529
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Why are you comparing Maryland to far upper Northeastern states instead of comparing it to Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware? It's very much like those Northeastern states. The DC metro is not the Sunbelt. That's like comparing Missouri and saying it's not Midwestern because it's not like the Upper Midwest. New England and the Upper Midwest aren't the core regions of the Northeast and Midwest respectively.
I'm pretty sure you know he didn't say that. He said the region's growth patterns are Sunbelt-like and he'd be correct on that point.
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