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Old 08-09-2016, 08:01 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,546,239 times
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Boston would have
Lowell (110,000)
Cambridge (110,000)
Brockton (94,000)
Lynn (93,000)
Quincy (92,000)
Newton (88,000)
Somerville (80,000)
Lawrence (78,000)
In it's CSA
Worcester MSA
Worcester (183,000)
Providence MSA
Providence (179,000)
New Bedford (95,000)
Fall River (88,000)
Pawtucket (72,000)
Manchester MSA
Manchester (109,000)
Nashua (87,000)
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Old 08-09-2016, 08:14 AM
 
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Grand Rapids had more than I thought because of the small city pop. None of them are huge, I'll give the 20k or higher. The only one that has a distinguishable core is Holland. The rest are sleeper burbs that have gotten bigger by default. I'm not really sure they would count as a secondary city.

Cities:
Wyoming 75k
Kentwood 53k
Holland 27k (Although really it functions as a separate urban area)
Walker 25K

Michigan has a frustrating law that allows townships to charter themselves. It forces them to provide police and school services, but stops short of forcing them to fully function as a city. This was put in place to prevent Detroit from getting too powerful when it was in power growth mode 90 years ago. Today it is part of the noose around core cities necks landlocking them and making them look smaller on paper. There are a few suburban townships that fit this criteria.

Georgetown Twp 50k
Plainfield Twp 33k
Holland Twp 35K (Part of the Holland urban cluster)
Gaines Twp 26K
Allendale Twp 23K
Byron Twp 23K
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Old 08-09-2016, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,161,688 times
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I guess the closest thing in the NYC area is the Town of Hempstead, with a population of 770,000, but even that doesn't make the 10% cut.
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Old 08-09-2016, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,873,423 times
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Phoenix (1.56 mil)

Mesa=471,000/30%
Chandler=247,000/16%
Scottsdale=237,000/15%
Glendale=226,000/14%
Gilbert=208,000/13% *
Tempe=162,000/10%

*Gilbert is a town officially rather than a city
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Old 08-09-2016, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,974,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
wow, I'm actually surprised, I thought there would be at least one city, but like you said it has to do with the small boundries, but even then it's just mainly Camden, Wilmington and Trenton.
Not even those three reach the 10% cutoff, which would be, like kidphilly said, around 155k. In fact, all three are only around half of that total, give or take. Wilmington's metropolitan division would be around 10% of the Delaware Valley MSA total, but that's not what the question asked. This metric really doesn't favor large primate cities that have small satellites/suburbs (New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Baltimore, etc.).
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Old 08-09-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Once a city crosses 300k, it's considered a large city, and should be immune to being considered a suburb or second city.
Especially if most people living there work there.
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Old 08-09-2016, 10:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Once a city crosses 300k, it's considered a large city, and should be immune to being considered a suburb or second city.
Especially if most people living there work there.
If they are in a metropolitan area and do not have a central core, or their own urban cluster, how are they NOT suburban or secondary? There are plenty of sleeper suburbs, especially in Texas and out west that have reached those numbers simply by annexation. They owe their existence to the core cities presence, as they may not exist even in name without it.

Aurora Co covers 155sq mi and contains 360k people in it and has a population density of 2100 sq mi. East of the Mississippi Aurora would be a collection of 5-8 suburbs covering much smaller boundaries. Relaxed Annexation laws in the west have allowed giant suburbs. You are basically saying that Aurora should have the same recognition that Denver itself does, even though if Denver were not there, Aurora would not be there. Doesn't seem to get anymore secondary than that. The same could be said about several "large cities" that owe their growth to a parasitic adjacency to a core city.
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,403,138 times
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Based on the criteria in this thread Columbus, OH (metro population roughly 2 million) has zero secondary cities. There are several surrounding suburbs in the 30k - upper 40k population range.
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,873,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Once a city crosses 300k, it's considered a large city, and should be immune to being considered a suburb or second city.
Especially if most people living there work there.
Well, San Jose despite being the most populous city in the Bay Area and a pop of 1.02 million is still a suburb, San Francisco is the main city
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,945 posts, read 2,218,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Well, San Jose despite being the most populous city in the Bay Area and a pop of 1.02 million is still a suburb, San Francisco is the main city
however the two are considered to be there own MSA.
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