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Old 08-13-2016, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,086 posts, read 1,068,704 times
Reputation: 1933

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Real significant fall color only happens in far inland/elevated areas of the South. And even said areas of the region are much too warm, climate-wise, for the annual shed/growth cycle of deciduous trees to be an evolutionary advantage.
Clearly you've never visited NC in the fall, or you would have said so. Also, if you were more familiar with NC's geography, you'd know that a majority of the population does, in fact live inland, up slightly at approximately 500'-1,500'- not on the coastal plain.

And after spending 15 years of my life in Central/Western NC, I'll stand by my assertion that most people in NC see a significant amount of color in the fall.

Perhaps it's time you added experiential learning to your knowledge base. I would suggest going on a road trip to the region in late October or early November.

Last edited by bartonizer; 08-13-2016 at 04:34 PM..
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Old 08-13-2016, 04:23 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Clearly you've never visited NC in the fall, or you would have said so. Also, if you were more familiar with NC's geography, you'd know that a majority of the population does, in fact live inland, up slightly at approximately 500'-1,500'- not on the coastal plain.

And after spending 15 years of my life in Central/Western NC, I'll stand by my assertion that most people in NC see a significant amount of color in the fall.

Perhaps it's time you added experiential learning to your knowledge base.
It still doesn't change what I said; great fall color in the South only happens in elevated/inland portions of the region. Even those regions are too warm for those kinds of trees, and the entire area will be replaced by evergreens in the future.
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Old 08-13-2016, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,086 posts, read 1,068,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
It still doesn't change what I said; great fall color in the South only happens in elevated/inland portions of the region. Even those regions are too warm for those kinds of trees, and the entire area will be replaced by evergreens in the future.
You said earlier that there's no fall color in NC, so you've already changed your tune. And I think you'd really be surprised by the climate above, say 3,000'-3,500' feet.

I'm not sure why you keep babbling about the future, but it's irrelevant to what any human living today would experience. Unless you're cryogenically freezing yourself and (finally) planning your first fall trip to NC several thousand years from now.
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Old 08-13-2016, 04:42 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
You said earlier that there's no fall color in NC, so you've already changed your tune. And I think you'd really be surprised by the climate above, say 3,000'-3,500' feet.

I'm not sure why you keep babbling about the future, but it's irrelevant unless you're (finally) planning your first fall trip to NC several thousand years from now.
I've always said, since the beginning, that fall color in the South, including in NC, happened significantly only in higher elevations/or inland areas.
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Old 08-13-2016, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,086 posts, read 1,068,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
I've always said, since the beginning, that fall color in the South, including in NC, happened significantly only in higher elevations/or inland areas.
Nope. You said "no color except at higher elevations" -and like others, I'm telling you it's not true. Again a simple trip by you to the region during the fall would end this argument!
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Old 08-13-2016, 05:55 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Nope. You said "no color except at higher elevations" -and like others, I'm telling you it's not true. Again a simple trip by you to the region during the fall would end this argument!
This was my first post in this thread:
Quote:
Fall foliage in the South matching the Northeast is found only in the high elevations of the region, as well as the northern/inland tiers of the region. The rest of the South is too warm and tropical-like year-round to see any spectacular fall color of note. Deciduous trees on the Southern coastal plain are a relic from the Ice Age.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/45062213-post10.html
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Old 08-13-2016, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Nope. You said "no color except at higher elevations" -and like others, I'm telling you it's not true. Again a simple trip by you to the region during the fall would end this argument!
To be fair, Viral didn't say there was no color. He said there was no color of equal value to the north in the lowland south.

For the majority of the lowland south, this is true.
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Old 08-13-2016, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,086 posts, read 1,068,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
This was my first post in this thread:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/45062213-post10.html
Later, you argued with someone from NC who made the comment that there is color throughout the state, and that is what I took issue with. I'm not going to address every single post that you made- you clearly don't have the benefit of experiencing NC in the fall firsthand. This is the specific conversation that led to me making a comment in the first place:

Carolina Blue: People around here do not assume that at all. Plenty of Fall foliage to be seen here and some of the grandest views just a short drive away in the mountains. It's very common for folks to day trip up to the Blue Ridge Parkway to see the colors. Even the local Mets have peak fall foliage maps for that specific reason.

Viral: No fall color in NC except for high elevations. NC is way too warm and tropical for fall color.

Carolina Blue: Nah

Viral: Why deny the truth?

Bryan85: Why do make such an all encompassing statement- as if your opinion were fact?

Viral: It's not opinion, it is fact. NC is a subtropical state.

Sure sounds to me like you think fall colors are only confined to high elevations in NC and just made an incorrect generalization. One more time, I'll make the point that most of NC sees a significant amount of fall color, even towards the coast- though obviously not as consistent as New England though the mountains can give it a run. Anyway, if you ever go to Raleigh or Charlotte or Greensboro in the fall, you'll see a lot of leaves changing- from Elizabeth City- near the coast: https://500px.com/photo/90742529/fal...by-gary-hollar to Chapel Hill: http://www.hercampus.com/high-school...t-fall-foliage to Charlotte: Colorful autumn leaves in downtown / uptown Charlotte North Carolina in fall 2009 | Patrick Schneider | Charlotte NC Photography to obviously Asheville and the Blue Ridge Parkway: http://ds0ucpy89hlve.cloudfront.net/...2_s_c1_c_c.jpg. Apparently, most of the state shows a higher amount of color than people, like yourself, realize.
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Old 08-13-2016, 09:07 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,921 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Later, you argued with someone from NC who made the comment that there is color throughout the state, and that is what I took issue with. I'm not going to address every single post that you made- you clearly don't have the benefit of experiencing NC in the fall firsthand. This is the specific conversation that led to me making a comment in the first place:

Carolina Blue: People around here do not assume that at all. Plenty of Fall foliage to be seen here and some of the grandest views just a short drive away in the mountains. It's very common for folks to day trip up to the Blue Ridge Parkway to see the colors. Even the local Mets have peak fall foliage maps for that specific reason.

Viral: No fall color in NC except for high elevations. NC is way too warm and tropical for fall color.

Carolina Blue: Nah

Viral: Why deny the truth?

Bryan85: Why do make such an all encompassing statement- as if your opinion were fact?

Viral: It's not opinion, it is fact. NC is a subtropical state.

Sure sounds to me like you think fall colors are only confined to high elevations in NC and just made an incorrect generalization. One more time, I'll make the point that most of NC sees a significant amount of fall color, even towards the coast- though obviously not as consistent as New England though the mountains can give it a run. Anyway, if you ever go to Raleigh or Charlotte or Greensboro in the fall, you'll see a lot of leaves changing- from Elizabeth City- near the coast: https://500px.com/photo/90742529/fal...by-gary-hollar to Chapel Hill: http://www.hercampus.com/high-school...t-fall-foliage to Charlotte: Colorful autumn leaves in downtown / uptown Charlotte North Carolina in fall 2009 | Patrick Schneider | Charlotte NC Photography to obviously Asheville and the Blue Ridge Parkway: http://ds0ucpy89hlve.cloudfront.net/...2_s_c1_c_c.jpg. Apparently, most of the state shows a higher amount of color than people, like yourself, realize.
Well, I neglected the specifics in that particular conversation, so my fault with that. However, the general point still stands: no where in the South, other than far northern/inland areas, as well as the high elevations, is going to see significant fall color. That goes for NC as well.
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Old 08-14-2016, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,144,972 times
Reputation: 4487
I don't get it either. Most regions of the country have tons of beautiful fall foliage.
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