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Old 08-14-2016, 02:19 AM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,870,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
I don't get it either. Most regions of the country have tons of beautiful fall foliage.
Read post 98, as fall colors are not the same everywhere. Again: "Anthocyanins are present in about 10% of tree species in temperate regions, although in certain areas ó most famously New England ó up to 70% of tree species may produce the pigment."

Due to the great percentage of tree species producing anthocyanins, which produces shades of orange, red, and bronze during fall colors, and the fact that much of the leaf turn takes place concurrently and in the span of a few weeks, those areas of the north with heavy concentrations of maples and other anthocyanin-producing tree species are rightfully famed for their vibrant fall colors.

Topography also is important.

Being immersed in fall colors in a valley, or seeing them from a mountain or a large hill, is a very different experience than walking through a flat forest.

Then throw in the classical New England architecture, and voila, find a leaf peeping heaven. There is a reason that people travel from all over the world specifically to witness fall colors in New England.

Southern leaf turns have less varied color, and due to climate differences, the leaf turn takes place over a longer period and isn't as concentrated. Candidly, with global warming, my belief is that in some areas of the north, including northeast Ohio, leaf turn isn't as concentrated in a time span as it was in decades past.

Yes, there are other places in the north that offer similar experiences to New England, including the Adirondack region of New York.

Fall colors in Colorado, where the yellow aspens provide most of the spectacle, also still requires catching a relatively narrow window of time for peak colors.
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Old 08-14-2016, 10:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
Read post 98, as fall colors are not the same everywhere. Again: "Anthocyanins are present in about 10% of tree species in temperate regions, although in certain areas — most famously New England — up to 70% of tree species may produce the pigment."

Due to the great percentage of tree species producing anthocyanins, which produces shades of orange, red, and bronze during fall colors, and the fact that much of the leaf turn takes place concurrently and in the span of a few weeks, those areas of the north with heavy concentrations of maples and other anthocyanin-producing tree species are rightfully famed for their vibrant fall colors.

Topography also is important.

Being immersed in fall colors in a valley, or seeing them from a mountain or a large hill, is a very different experience than walking through a flat forest.

Then throw in the classical New England architecture, and voila, find a leaf peeping heaven. There is a reason that people travel from all over the world specifically to witness fall colors in New England.

Southern leaf turns have less varied color, and due to climate differences, the leaf turn takes place over a longer period and isn't as concentrated. Candidly, with global warming, my belief is that in some areas of the north, including northeast Ohio, leaf turn isn't as concentrated in a time span as it was in decades past.

Yes, there are other places in the north that offer similar experiences to New England, including the Adirondack region of New York.

Fall colors in Colorado, where the yellow aspens provide most of the spectacle, also still requires catching a relatively narrow window of time for peak colors.



I highly doubt most people in the world are concerned with anthocyanins.

To the vast majority of people, you can get fall foliage almost anywhere. New England just markets itself on it because it can't market itself on much else.

I've lived overseas. Not one person knew anything about New England other than sports. Most of which were Canadian anyway, and had their own.
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Old 08-14-2016, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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I live in New Jersey, which is not New England, and which has beautiful fall colors, so THIS part of "the rest of the country" knows it's not true!

Fall Colors and Foliage in New Jersey
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:40 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
The rest of the country DOES NOT think that. Fall foliage in the South is equally impressive.

GEORGIA:
I thought exactly the same thing...the Blue Ridge Parkway is well known also for fall foliage - just as much as New England.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Fall foliage in the South matching the Northeast is found only in the high elevations of the region, as well as the northern/inland tiers of the region. The rest of the South is too warm and tropical-like year-round to see any spectacular fall color of note. Deciduous trees on the Southern coastal plain are a relic from the Ice Age.
You have no idea what you're talking about...the Piedmont region of the South has beautiful fall foliage and it's not as high elevations and it's not warm and tropical. Apparently you think the mountains go directly into the coastal plain, but the Piedmont is between the two.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
You have no idea what you're talking about...the Piedmont region of the South has beautiful fall foliage and it's not as high elevations and it's not warm and tropical. Apparently you think the mountains go directly into the coastal plain, but the Piedmont is between the two.
No surprise, considering that the Piedmont is well inland, and is at the northerly areas of the South. Never disputed that such areas in the region can see fall color.

However, I will say that even the Piedmont is much too warm in climate to have deciduous trees; the cold isn't enough for tree dormancy.
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Old 08-14-2016, 12:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NomadHere View Post


I highly doubt most people in the world are concerned with anthocyanins.

To the vast majority of people, you can get fall foliage almost anywhere. New England just markets itself on it because it can't market itself on much else.

I've lived overseas. Not one person knew anything about New England other than sports. Most of which were Canadian anyway, and had their own.
"Most people in the world" are concerned with finding enough food, clean water, and shelter needed to survive.

Yet New England is a significant international attraction during Leaf Turn. Do a search on a website such as tripadvisor.com if you don't believe me.

Even persons in northeast Ohio, where we have a great Leaf Turn, still make the journey to see the show in New England. None of them would ever consider going to the South to see fall colors.

A relatively monochromatic and less intense Leaf Turn (over many more weeks than in New England) explains why locations for Leaf Turn in the South are mostly a regional attraction. Are they beautiful? Yes, but they more resemble what you would see in Europe, where trees lack anthocyanins.
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Old 08-14-2016, 04:02 PM
 
131 posts, read 97,401 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
"Most people in the world" are concerned with finding enough food, clean water, and shelter needed to survive.

Yet New England is a significant international attraction during Leaf Turn. Do a search on a website such as tripadvisor.com if you don't believe me.

Even persons in northeast Ohio, where we have a great Leaf Turn, still make the journey to see the show in New England. None of them would ever consider going to the South to see fall colors.

A relatively monochromatic and less intense Leaf Turn (over many more weeks than in New England) explains why locations for Leaf Turn in the South are mostly a regional attraction. Are they beautiful? Yes, but they more resemble what you would see in Europe, where trees lack anthocyanins.

I live directly next to New England, and have lived overseas, and this is news to me.

New England has a premium on fall foliage as much as California does on it's beaches. There are still other plenty of other areas to go.

As stated earlier, New England markets itself well.
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Old 08-14-2016, 08:06 PM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,870,632 times
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Originally Posted by NomadHere View Post
this is news to me.
Would you agree that a major European newspaper knows more about fall colors in Europe than you?

<<The colour of a British wood in autumn is predominantly yellow. There are relatively few European trees which have red leaves in the autumn. But there are splashes of crimson or rust-red colours from a few indigenous trees, like the rowan, as well as from introduced species, like the North American red oak.....

Autumn is much redder in North America and east Asia than it is in northern Europe, and this canít be explained by temperature differences alone. >>

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...-north-america

Why Fall Colors Are Different in U.S. and Europe
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Old 08-14-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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WR, I will take your word for New England's "anthocyanins". Others will note the large number of sugar maples.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acer_saccharum (Sugar Maples with map)

But here is the thing, those anthocyanins in leaves do not magically disappear when they cross the border into neighboring New York, Quebec and New Brunswick do they? Or nearby Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio and Nova Scotia? Or areas on the same latitude like Michigan and Wisconsin?

So I am not even debating whether the falls colors of North Carolina or Georgia or Colorado, etc. are being overlooked when being compared to New England. I am saying that even New England's nearby neighbors are being overlooked despite having similar climate and forests.

And that implies at least some kind of successful marketing and positive stereotyping for New England.
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