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Old 08-14-2016, 09:59 PM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,538,178 times
Reputation: 2356

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadHere View Post


I highly doubt most people in the world are concerned with anthocyanins.

To the vast majority of people, you can get fall foliage almost anywhere. New England just markets itself on it because it can't market itself on much else.

I've lived overseas. Not one person knew anything about New England other than sports. Most of which were Canadian anyway, and had their own.
Three different publications from the UK:

New England in the fall
https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2...nd-autumn-fall
New England in the Fall: Trip of a Lifetime - Telegraph

It took me about 30 seconds on Google to find these articles.

"New England just markets itself on it because it can't market itself on much else" is a patently absurd comment. If you pick up a travel guide to New England, maybe 1 percent of it will be dedicated to fall colors. I've basically been on a vacation in New England for three years and I haven't even scratched the surface of things to see and do, and virtually none of it has had anything to do with trees.

Honestly, what a ridiculous thing to say. Adjusted for area, there are probably more sights to see here than anywhere else in America. Today I went to Plymouth for the first time. You know, the place where the Pilgrims landed? All the leaves were green. Every one of them. There were still tourists. How was that even possible?!

I've been following this thread for the past week and have found it so frustrating, but I haven't seen fit to weigh in yet for whatever reason. First off, it's based on a completely false premise. Nobody thinks "New England is the only place with fall foliage." They think New England has the greatest concentration of it of any region, which others have shown is true. Also, nobody thinks there's some magic wall at New York's eastern border that prevents scientific principles from holding true on the western side. Astoundingly, a lot of people here don't seem to fully grasp this very, very simple concept, but "New England" is an artificial geographic distinction invented by people, as is "New York" or "Utah" or "Outer Mongolia" or whatever. Of course there are good fall colors in Upstate New York! It's essentially the same thing as New England! The fact that the Adirondacks look great in the fall proves, not disproves, that New England is a worthy destination for fall foliage.

I'm not a mind reader (yet!), but I'm pretty sure I have you figured out by virtue of your comments in this and other threads. I think you've lived many years in Upstate New York, right next to New England, and all this time you've been hearing "New England is so great" and "oh, the barns!" and "it's like the trees are on fire!" and "OMG, I literally can't even with the charm!" And you think, That's not fair, why doesn't anyone talk about where I live in those terms? You take day trips over to New England, and you think, This is basically the same thing!, which of course it is, because remember, there's no magic wall. And that fills you with irrational hate for New England.

I understand this because I also grew up just outside of New England and heard the same stuff and felt the same envy, but I reacted to it in a different way: I visited as much as I could, then I moved here.
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Old 08-14-2016, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
DC isn't a true subtropical climate, and neither is most of Virginia (except, perhaps, Virginia Beach). Fall color is triggered by latitude, not temp, anyways.
lmao at this especially regarding Virginia.
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Old 08-14-2016, 10:53 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,858 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
lmao at this especially regarding Virginia.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trew...classification
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...th_America.jpg
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:01 PM
 
131 posts, read 97,308 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
WR, I will take your word for New England's "anthocyanins". Others will note the large number of sugar maples.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acer_saccharum (Sugar Maples with map)

But here is the thing, those anthocyanins in leaves do not magically disappear when they cross the border into neighboring New York, Quebec and New Brunswick do they? Or nearby Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio and Nova Scotia? Or areas on the same latitude like Michigan and Wisconsin?

So I am not even debating whether the falls colors of North Carolina or Georgia or Colorado, etc. are being overlooked when being compared to New England. I am saying that even New England's nearby neighbors are being overlooked despite having similar climate and forests.

And that implies at least some kind of successful marketing and positive stereotyping for New England.

Beat me to the punch.


90% of the fall foliage that New England markets is in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.

As you have already said, I highly doubt the anthocyanins magically change in significance when you cross one side of the NYC suburbs (CT) to the other (NJ).
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
uh huh
http://www.guide-to-disney.com/weath...ical_zones.png
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...atemapusa2.PNG
http://addins.wrex.com/blogs/weather.../02/SOCHIA.png
http://images.slideplayer.com/23/666...es/slide_2.jpg
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...act=mrc&uact=8
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:12 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,858 times
Reputation: 151
Different maps have their own isotherms dictating what is/isn't subtropical. So NoVa/DC can make it on some maps, but not others. But since NoVa/DC isn't classed as subtropical on all maps, it isn't a solid subtropical climate.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:13 PM
 
131 posts, read 97,308 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
Three different publications from the UK:

New England in the fall
https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2...nd-autumn-fall
New England in the Fall: Trip of a Lifetime - Telegraph

It took me about 30 seconds on Google to find these articles.

"New England just markets itself on it because it can't market itself on much else" is a patently absurd comment. If you pick up a travel guide to New England, maybe 1 percent of it will be dedicated to fall colors. I've basically been on a vacation in New England for three years and I haven't even scratched the surface of things to see and do, and virtually none of it has had anything to do with trees.

Honestly, what a ridiculous thing to say. Adjusted for area, there are probably more sights to see here than anywhere else in America. Today I went to Plymouth for the first time. You know, the place where the Pilgrims landed? All the leaves were green. Every one of them. There were still tourists. How was that even possible?!

I've been following this thread for the past week and have found it so frustrating, but I haven't seen fit to weigh in yet for whatever reason. First off, it's based on a completely false premise. Nobody thinks "New England is the only place with fall foliage." They think New England has the greatest concentration of it of any region, which others have shown is true. Also, nobody thinks there's some magic wall at New York's eastern border that prevents scientific principles from holding true on the western side. Astoundingly, a lot of people here don't seem to fully grasp this very, very simple concept, but "New England" is an artificial geographic distinction invented by people, as is "New York" or "Utah" or "Outer Mongolia" or whatever. Of course there are good fall colors in Upstate New York! It's essentially the same thing as New England! The fact that the Adirondacks look great in the fall proves, not disproves, that New England is a worthy destination for fall foliage.

I'm not a mind reader (yet!), but I'm pretty sure I have you figured out by virtue of your comments in this and other threads. I think you've lived many years in Upstate New York, right next to New England, and all this time you've been hearing "New England is so great" and "oh, the barns!" and "it's like the trees are on fire!" and "OMG, I literally can't even with the charm!" And you think, That's not fair, why doesn't anyone talk about where I live in those terms? You take day trips over to New England, and you think, This is basically the same thing!, which of course it is, because remember, there's no magic wall. And that fills you with irrational hate for New England.

I understand this because I also grew up just outside of New England and heard the same stuff and felt the same envy, but I reacted to it in a different way: I visited as much as I could, then I moved here.

Nobody is saying New England doesn't have fall foliage or isn't worthy though, and you just validated the thread. It's about letting outsiders know that there are more places for fall foliage tourism (ie: Upstate NY, NJ, PA).

Moving to New England? A brave (wo)man. I've lived in Michigan, New Jersey and overseas, aside Upstate. I have my eyes on Pennsylvania or Washington next. I never really had much reason until the last few years to go to New England much. I have made it a point to visit every city and state there. There are aspects I like, and aspects I don't.

NJ, downstate NY, and PA (Lehigh Valley and Delaware Valley/Philly) all have the same colors and topography. I loved driving from Central Jersey through the Poconos to Upstate. It was a gorgeous fall drive full of vibrant colors, and I was nowhere near New England.

The inspiration for this thread was a user from California openly declaring her ignorance about the topic. She thought only New England had fall foliage. Now she knows there are plenty of other places for it. That's great. Spreading the word.

I come from a beautiful state in the Northeast, and so do people from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, etc. Excuse us if we want to set the record straight on things we enjoy about them.

Honestly, despite the fact that people want to constantly focus on subregions like Mid-Atlantic and New England, it's all one region to most outsiders. There isn't a huge difference in feel between New England and the Mid-Atlantic. The climate is the biggest one.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:19 PM
 
131 posts, read 97,308 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
And that implies at least some kind of successful marketing and positive stereotyping for New England.

It's always been seen as a region that kind of is above or looks down on others, no?
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Different maps have their own isotherms dictating what is/isn't subtropical. So NoVa/DC can make it on some maps, but not others. But since NoVa/DC isn't classed as subtropical on all maps, it isn't a solid subtropical climate.
That's a laughable and ridiculous conclusion. But carry on and my point still stands whether you like it or not, Wipe0ut.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:56 PM
 
470 posts, read 286,858 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
That's a laughable and ridiculous conclusion. But carry on and my point still stands whether you like it or not, Wipe0ut.
Maybe voice your reasons on this thread?
Does Washington D.C has a Humid subtropical climate ?
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