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Old 08-09-2016, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
Reputation: 7710

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
The only reason Denton isn't forested is due to the heavy clay soil, which precludes extensive forest. If Denton had soil like Tyler, TX, it would be covered with thick pine forest. Trust me. Many evergreens can take temps down to the teens and single digits, they would survive in Denton.

Even the open space areas look nothing like the Midwest; Denton's open spaces are more subtropical, like the Argentinean Pampas.

Yes, the inland South swings during winter, but the low temps still aren't severe enough, nor do they last long enough, to warrant dormancy in trees.

And yet Tyler still has deciduous trees.. look it that! Bro, I grew up in Miami.. None of the vegetation here is anything like down in Miami.

Denton's open spaces look nothing like the pampas. It looks like Oklahoma and Kansas. If anything west Texas or New Mexico look like the pampas. Try planting a mango here in Denton see how well it does lol. Have you even been here? Like ever? Have you seen a picture?
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Yes, much of Texas is in the Great Plains; the warm, subtropical evergreen portion of it.



50s is more than warm enough to prevent dormancy; those are average winter temps in many areas of the Mediterranean. You think plants need to go dormant in Nice, France?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nice#Climate

Yes, temps take dips to the teens, but, given that many evergreens can survive teens, and that such occurrences are brief in the inland South, it still isn't enough for winter dormancy.

No denial, just providing hard, solid fact. Once again, this place is colder on average than Dallas during winter and is lined with palm trees.



Well, the trees in the inland South retain their leaves much later than up North, so technically, it isn't the same. You need sustained, prolonged sheer cold in order to provide the winter period necessary for dormancy; brief cold snaps don't cut it.
Umm nope. The evergreens that survive the teens are are pines and some hardier evergreen oaks.

Btw Denton is colder than Dallas. Not by a whole lot but by enough to make a difference. Not uncommon for it to be in the high 50s here and 70s in Dallas. Also remember, that Miyazaki place is on the coast, north Texas is not, I'm betting we have more highs in the 20s-30s than that place does by a LONG shot.

Duluth, Minnesota loses its leaves before Chicago, so what? If our climate was too warm like you said, how do trees go dormant?
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577
Viral, aka Wipe0ut, aka Yn0htna wants to be right all the time and is argumentative. Makes any thread unreadable once he participates in one.

Yes I've seen fall foliage in Texas. Even as far down to Central Texas in the hill country and areas bordering and yes I've seen it in Northeast Texas as well.
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Old 08-10-2016, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Rochester NY
1,250 posts, read 823,096 times
Reputation: 2006
Can we just all agree that Upstate NY and Vermont have the best fall foliage in the country?
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Old 08-10-2016, 06:28 AM
 
470 posts, read 287,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
And yet Tyler still has deciduous trees.. look it that! Bro, I grew up in Miami.. None of the vegetation here is anything like down in Miami.

Denton's open spaces look nothing like the pampas. It looks like Oklahoma and Kansas. If anything west Texas or New Mexico look like the pampas. Try planting a mango here in Denton see how well it does lol. Have you even been here? Like ever? Have you seen a picture?
Tyler has deciduous trees for the same reason the rest of the inland Southern US does; they are Ice Age relics. Never said anything about Denton being able to grow tropical plants and evergreens like Miami, so I have no clue why you are even bringing it up.

I believe I should have specified the areas of the Pampas I was speaking of, so here it goes:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humid_Pampas

Both the Denton spaces and the Humid Pampas are subtropical grassland regions, and, thus, are alike in many ways. The subtropical part of the Great Plains corresponds to the entirety of Oklahoma, as well as far southern areas of Kansas and Missouri, so it is no surprise that the resemblance is there. The trees that you see in Denton don't even range above Oklahoma/lower Midwest:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sideroxylon_lanuginosum
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_fusiformis

My only argument is that the cold experienced in Denton isn't enough to warrant plants to evolve dormancy. Yes, there are trees go bare, but they are Ice Age relics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Umm nope. The evergreens that survive the teens are are pines and some hardier evergreen oaks.

Btw Denton is colder than Dallas. Not by a whole lot but by enough to make a difference. Not uncommon for it to be in the high 50s here and 70s in Dallas. Also remember, that Miyazaki place is on the coast, north Texas is not, I'm betting we have more highs in the 20s-30s than that place does by a LONG shot.

Duluth, Minnesota loses its leaves before Chicago, so what? If our climate was too warm like you said, how do trees go dormant?
Denton isn't cooler than Dallas enough to make a difference, and given the close proximity between the two locales, there would hardly be that significant of a difference, in that it is 50s in Denton, yet 70s in Dallas ( unless temporarily as a cold front moves through).

I showed Miyazaki more to illustrate the point that cool averages/winter temps (i.e. average highs in the 50s) don't impede evergreen plant growth, as long as conditions remain overall warm enough to prevent winter dormancy. While North Texas is indeed more continental than South Japan, it still remains warm enough for evergreens, since many species can take the conditions seen in even the most extreme deviation scenarios. Again, places in South Korea with average lows below freezing are evergreen.

Deciduous trees in the southern US are Ice Age relics, end of story.
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Old 08-10-2016, 07:09 AM
 
Location: New York City
1,254 posts, read 1,097,886 times
Reputation: 1027
Weird thread. Most people don't even think of fall foliage......
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
679 posts, read 463,958 times
Reputation: 938
MY trees are better than Your trees
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,827,316 times
Reputation: 2858
Because New England has the BEST fall foliage.
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:49 AM
 
131 posts, read 97,428 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Because New England has the BEST fall foliage.
How?

I didn't know their leaves descended upon us from the heavens and Upstate New York and everyone else's are just Fisher Price leaves.

Leaves are leaves.
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:51 AM
 
131 posts, read 97,428 times
Reputation: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsence View Post
Weird thread. Most people don't even think of fall foliage......

Most polls show Fall is the most popular season. America loves Fall.
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