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Old 08-09-2016, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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The state of Florida has 67 counties and 67 school districts. The state of Georgia has 159 counties and 180 school districts, including 21 city districts that were grandfathered in. The Constitution of the State of Georgia forbids the creation of new school districts or subdivision of existing districts, but encourages the consolidation of city-county districts, which has happened a handful of times.

In Alabama, there are few if any laws governing the formation of new school districts and many tiny districts exist throughout the state, including very rural areas, some with only a few hundred students and quite often extremely segregated. In the Birmingham suburbs, it has been a practice for generations that wealthy white neighborhoods will vote to break away from city or county districts whenever they feel threatened by encroaching demographic change -- something that's forbidden by law in Georgia and Florida.
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Old 08-09-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
In Alabama, there are few if any laws governing the formation of new school districts and many tiny districts exist throughout the state, including very rural areas, some with only a few hundred students and quite often extremely segregated. In the Birmingham suburbs, it has been a practice for generations that wealthy white neighborhoods will vote to break away from city or county districts whenever they feel threatened by encroaching demographic change -- something that's forbidden by law in Georgia and Florida (and North Carolina as well, I believe).
In Pennsylvania, the number of school districts decreased from 2,277 in the 1960s to 669, then down to 505 during the 1970s. But during the 80s only four districts were eliminated, and during the 90s none at all.

The count is now 500. The most recent merger was the only voluntary one in Pennsylvania history - all prior mergers were due to coercive acts of the legislature.
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Old 08-09-2016, 08:10 PM
 
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According to this, there are 733 school districts in NY State: NYSED:: School District Website Directory

Keep in mind that some of these districts only go up to say 4th, 6th or 8th grade and consists of a school building. Children have a choice of which school/high school they can go to after their last grade at the school. For instance, kids from this K-8 school/school district just outside of Albany have a choice of 3 high schools that they could attend: About Menands School - Menands School District, Menands, NY

Menands School - Public School

Menands School - Menands, New york - NY - School overview
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:18 AM
 
56,645 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
According to this, there are 733 school districts in NY State: NYSED:: School District Website Directory

Keep in mind that some of these districts only go up to say 4th, 6th or 8th grade and consists of a school building. Children have a choice of which school/high school they can go to after their last grade at the school. For instance, kids from this K-8 school/school district just outside of Albany have a choice of 3 high schools that they could attend: About Menands School - Menands School District, Menands, NY

Menands School - Public School

Menands School - Menands, New york - NY - School overview
Also, in NY State you have what are called the Big 5 School Districts which are NYC, Buffalo, Rochester, Yonkers and Syracuse. It is in reference to the 5 biggest cities and school districts in the state.

http://big5schools.org (includes Utica: Utica schools joins Big 5 Conference - News - Uticaod - Utica, NY )

New York State School Boards Association
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Old 08-10-2016, 02:12 PM
 
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The Baltimore metro has 6. One for each county. AFAIK there was never a great period of district reduction, and school districts were always based on the county system.
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Old 08-10-2016, 08:26 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
The Baltimore metro has 6. One for each county. AFAIK there was never a great period of district reduction, and school districts were always based on the county system.
Its an interesting clue the word "always".

Countywide school districts seems to be common with many Southern states. Also, strong county governments versus the towns/boroughs/townships/villages etc. more common of the Northeast. Not saying Maryland is really considered Southern anymore but it is interesting you can still see clues that show Maryland's Southern roots from many years ago.
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Old 08-10-2016, 09:57 PM
 
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The delaware valley might have the most school districts of any metro. The philly school district, while large, is deteriorating and is more akin to a juvenile detention center than anything. The city is thus awash in charters and privates. Outside of Philly there are a million little school districts in every direction.
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Old 08-11-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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El Paso County which is Colorado Springs has 17 school districts I believe.

Denver which is similar population has only one.

There is a huge difference in quality from one district to another in El Paso County which is the Colorado Springs area.

They have a huge mixture from some of the worst districts in the state to some of the best. There is a huge difference between Harrison District 2 which is a district of mainly run-down, old duplexes to District 12 which is the Broadmoor area which is mainly huge homes and large lots against the mountains.

The odd thing about Colorado is that a majority of the funding comes from the state as opposed to local government as the property taxes are extremely low in Colorado.

I know Douglas County, Nebraska which is Omaha has many districts also. At least 6 that I could count.

Clark County which is Las Vegas has one district covering the entire county.
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Old 08-11-2016, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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To people who are in states with these mega-districts, I want to ask how they work out in terms of enrollment.

In states with very small school districts, many parents attempt to choose "the best district" for their child. This is probably a fool's errand, since the strongest correlations between school district performance are social class and race. The "good" districts are "good" because they tend to have wealthier white and Asian students, while the "bad" ones are lower income and have more black and Latino students.

Regardless, on the rare occasions where there is school district consolidation, you often see white middle class parents moving out of the district entirely. This doesn't seem like it's a feasible option with county-wide school districts. Are there pretty hard and fast feeder zones, so that the rich neighborhoods and the poor neighborhoods don't end up integrated in the schools? Or is there just a lot more use of private schools?
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Old 08-11-2016, 02:23 PM
 
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When I lived in Pennsylvania, it seemed like each little town had their own school district. When I moved to Florida I was shocked to learn that school districts are county-wide.... Like Miami-Dade Public Schools and Palm Beach County school district. Seems likea massive district to have when coming from PA.
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