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Old 08-09-2016, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,282,796 times
Reputation: 3827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Corporations need to start having headquarters and offices in cities like Syracuse, Youngstown, Little Rock, Norwich and Jackson, MS.
Corporate execs prefer the convenience of living near major hub airports.
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Old 08-09-2016, 07:08 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,123,469 times
Reputation: 2152
OP, links to back up your fear-based assertions? Constant gridlock? Nationwide extremely long wait times at ERs? Wat?
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Illinois
565 posts, read 821,161 times
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Cities are going to get bigger and bigger. I think that generations after my own (the current one) will start to affiliate cultural identities with megacity regions in the next 20-30 years more so than states, for example.

Rural towns are in decline and I think many of them will continue to decline, unfortunately. The reality for many companies is that a large infrastructure to support their business is already in place in larger cities; airports, transit, talent pool, capital assistance and so forth. I think telecommuting may alleviate some of this (I work from home frequently for my job) but it has been touted as the solution to dying rural towns for years and I don't see it gaining an incredible amount of traction at this point. I think a lot of that has to do with corporate culture being stuck in a time that is long gone.

Urbanization is the name of the game in terms of human migration. Hopefully it forces cities to be better designed in the long term.
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Old 08-10-2016, 06:27 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,300 posts, read 3,296,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingFar View Post
I think technology will solve this problem as more companies embrace telecommuting. Obviously they want to be based where the talent is (NY for finance and media, Silicon Valley for tech, Boston for education, LA for entertainment, etc.), and most will remain in urban centers for that reason, but they'll create more remote opportunities as well.
I completely agree. Telecommuting also saves companies money by not having to provide offices, air conditioning, water, etc.

I do tech support for a university and 100% of my work can be done from home. The only reason I ever need to be on campus is for meetings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoness View Post
Cities are going to get bigger and bigger. I think that generations after my own (the current one) will start to affiliate cultural identities with megacity regions in the next 20-30 years more so than states, for example.

Rural towns are in decline and I think many of them will continue to decline, unfortunately. The reality for many companies is that a large infrastructure to support their business is already in place in larger cities; airports, transit, talent pool, capital assistance and so forth. I think telecommuting may alleviate some of this (I work from home frequently for my job) but it has been touted as the solution to dying rural towns for years and I don't see it gaining an incredible amount of traction at this point. I think a lot of that has to do with corporate culture being stuck in a time that is long gone.

Urbanization is the name of the game in terms of human migration. Hopefully it forces cities to be better designed in the long term.
It's sad, but it's the truth. Most smart people who grow up in small towns end up leaving because there are no jobs.

I lived in a small town before moving to the large DFW area, and there are SO many more opportunities here in just about every direction. Even for retail jobs. Small towns might have a handful of retail opportunities. But this area has hundreds or thousands at a given time.
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Old 08-10-2016, 07:27 PM
 
433 posts, read 256,957 times
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Re: Rural areas and telecommuting - The "digital divide" and lack of decent/affordable high-speed Internet in many rural areas may be a factor. A generation ago the gap in technology between urban and rural areas was not as pronounced as it is now (although in the more distant past there have been similar periods like now).
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Old 08-10-2016, 11:06 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 873,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
I completely agree. Telecommuting also saves companies money by not having to provide offices, air conditioning, water, etc.

I do tech support for a university and 100% of my work can be done from home. The only reason I ever need to be on campus is for meetings.



It's sad, but it's the truth. Most smart people who grow up in small towns end up leaving because there are no jobs.

I lived in a small town before moving to the large DFW area, and there are SO many more opportunities here in just about every direction. Even for retail jobs. Small towns might have a handful of retail opportunities. But this area has hundreds or thousands at a given time.
It's not only jobs. Many people prefer the social/dating and cultural opportunities in big cities. Then there are the issues of schools in rural areas, and a lot of people want more opportunities for their kids like the public schools in suburbs or private schools in cities. In smaller cities, companies already have issues finding people to fill positions and have a tough time recruiting people to move to these places.
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Old 08-11-2016, 02:51 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,300 posts, read 3,296,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KellyXY View Post
Re: Rural areas and telecommuting - The "digital divide" and lack of decent/affordable high-speed Internet in many rural areas may be a factor. A generation ago the gap in technology between urban and rural areas was not as pronounced as it is now (although in the more distant past there have been similar periods like now).
I guess it depends on how rural we are talking about. I've lived in towns as small as 15,000 residents, and DSL/Cable high speed was easily available. In many cases, it worked better than some of the services I've gotten in larger cities.
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Old 08-11-2016, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
Reputation: 10533
That 38 million will be comprised entirely of children and immigrants. The children will be living with their parents. The immigrants will live in areas with jobs.

I fail to see any cause for concern. Even in buit up areas, the U.S. has much lower population density than other developed countries. We can fit quite a bit more.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:35 AM
 
83 posts, read 36,201 times
Reputation: 84
I don't see how would this be a problem. Even NYC has plenty of space to build up, especially in the outter boroughs. The only issue will be the water crisis in SoCal/Southwest. I don't think that area can handle a lot more. Many of the current coastal dwellers will be relocating to the interior because of cheaper housing as they always have. The contiguous 48 states is probably the best chunk of real estate in the world with ample furtile soil resources that can sustain billions of people. I see America as being the most populous country in the world in maybe 2 centuries from now
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Old 08-12-2016, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,191 posts, read 2,639,643 times
Reputation: 2226
Quote:
Originally Posted by globalcitizen View Post
I don't see how would this be a problem. Even NYC has plenty of space to build up, especially in the outter boroughs. The only issue will be the water crisis in SoCal/Southwest. I don't think that area can handle a lot more. Many of the current coastal dwellers will be relocating to the interior because of cheaper housing as they always have. The contiguous 48 states is probably the best chunk of real estate in the world with ample furtile soil resources that can sustain billions of people. I see America as being the most populous country in the world in maybe 2 centuries from now
That is very true. And there's an abundance of water on the eastern half. It wouldn't be a resource constraint, but more of an infrastructure constraint.
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