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Old 08-11-2016, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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Here is a a pretty cool graph depicting Columbus, Ohio's annexation over the years. As you can the city annexed a massive amount between the 50's and 70's. Essentially the city of Columbus controlled the water and sewer system in the region and made annexation a condition for formerly unincorporated areas to have access. That was mostly a strategy to preserve its tax base during a time period when Americans were fleeing in droves to suburbs across the country. So no I don't think we will see anymore massive annexations in anytime soon.

However, In recent years suburbs like Hilliard and New Albany are actually annexing land themselves.
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Old 08-12-2016, 06:15 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
When the Republicans took over the state of NC in the 2010 elections, one of the things that they did was put the kibosh on (practically) at-will annexation by cities. This has slowed annexation in its fastest growing cities to a slow crawl. Nonetheless, the cities still grow. While I believe the action was political punishment to cities for not being on their side of the spectrum, I think that it has actually served the cities well because they have to densify to grow their tax bases. The lesson being learned is that annexation isn't always required to grow.
That's happening in a lot of states. GOP law makers in Tennessee recently made it easier for neighborhoods to leave cities. I'm not a flaming Liberal but I don't understand why Republicans are so hostile to cities. In most cases annexed areas are more Republican which helps moderate city politics, also one large municipality seems like more efficient govt than a bunch of small cities and one impoverished inner city.


The only major growth due to annexation in my region is Jeffersonville Indiana, which is just across the river from Louisville KY. They went from 27,000 in 2000 to 46,000 in 2015 and probably 70% of the increase was due to annexation. They're still fighting to annex the city of Oak Park, which has another 6,000.
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Old 08-12-2016, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Cbus
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
That's happening in a lot of states. GOP law makers in Tennessee recently made it easier for neighborhoods to leave cities. I'm not a flaming Liberal but I don't understand why Republicans are so hostile to cities. In most cases annexed areas are more Republican which helps moderate city politics, also one large municipality seems like more efficient govt than a bunch of small cities and one impoverished inner city.


The only major growth due to annexation in my region is Jeffersonville Indiana, which is just across the river from Louisville KY. They went from 27,000 in 2000 to 46,000 in 2015 and probably 70% of the increase was due to annexation. They're still fighting to annex the city of Oak Park, which has another 6,000.
Their support primarily comes from white communities in the 'burbs and rural areas. Urban areas tend to have more racial/ethnic minorities, young people, LGBT individuals, immigrants etc. who tend to favor The Democratic Party. When drawing district lines one common practice is to include a central urban area with far out suburbs/exurbs effectively diluting the blue vote. Another practice is to "pack" as many Democratic voters as possible into one district and reduce their representation in the other districts i.e. Florida's 5th congressional District.

Of course when given the opportunity Democrats will also draw districts that favor their party and gerrymandering is a problem in both parties.
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Old 08-16-2016, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
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It's unlikely that Baltimore City will annex any additional land during any of our lifetimes. This is despite the fact that neighboring Baltimore County doesn't have a single municipality within its borders.

100 Years: Baltimore Seals Its Borders | Baltimore magazine
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Old 08-16-2016, 12:41 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,058,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
That's happening in a lot of states. GOP law makers in Tennessee recently made it easier for neighborhoods to leave cities. I'm not a flaming Liberal but I don't understand why Republicans are so hostile to cities. In most cases annexed areas are more Republican which helps moderate city politics, also one large municipality seems like more efficient govt than a bunch of small cities and one impoverished inner city.
In Canada, city consolidation and annexation is more often supported by Conservatives, the idea is that it'd lead to more efficient or at least cheaper government by having less governments. And an added plus is that the new city will vote more conservative. In Toronto's case, the inner old city was richer than the neighboring small cities it merged with. Probably also true of Halifax.
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Old 08-16-2016, 03:13 PM
 
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I wish Chicago could annex Evanston, Skokie, Oak park, River Forest and Berwyn. Oh well.
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Old 08-16-2016, 03:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by UrbanCheetah View Post
I wish Chicago could annex Evanston, Skokie, Oak park, River Forest and Berwyn. Oh well.
At 230 sq mi Chicago already has a pretty big foot print. Although Chicago being able to expand it's footprint and population would certainly quiet down the " 630sq mi Houston is overtaking Chicago" crowd.
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Old 08-18-2016, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
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Omaha just added 6,000 people last week.

San Antonio also has big annexations coming up, though they've slowed down from their original plans.

And of course Atlanta's been annexing pockets here and there all year.
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Old 08-19-2016, 04:03 AM
 
Location: NC
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Columbia SC and Richland County are considering merging in the next few years. If all goes well Columbia's city population will go from about 135,000 to around 400,000.

EXCLUSIVE: Merging Columbia, Richland County getting serious consideration | The State
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Old 08-19-2016, 04:27 AM
 
3,970 posts, read 3,505,039 times
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Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
Columbia SC and Richland County are considering merging in the next few years. If all goes well Columbia's city population will go from about 135,000 to around 400,000.

EXCLUSIVE: Merging Columbia, Richland County getting serious consideration | The State
That'll be a treat the day after that merger goes through and people are magically able to talk about how the new 760 sq mi Columbia has more people than Cincinnati. At this point every core city should just merge with their county.
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