U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-17-2016, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
3,258 posts, read 1,641,435 times
Reputation: 2898

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
In both 2002 and 2012 I rented from the same apartment complex on the nicest side of town in Louisville KY. In 2002 a 1 br was $450 a month, when I left in 2015 it was $621. Last year I moved across the river to a working class area on the Indiana side for cheaper housing. My mortgage payment for a 1950s ranch house is only $350 a month, you couldn't get a studio in the highest crime area for that.
Wow, excellent. The middle of the country in general is the part of the country that people have much more common sense when it comes to what a house or apartment should be.

I know the employer I worked at had the same wage in Denver as it did in Lincoln, Nebraska. The wage wasn't the best but unlimited overtime.

A 2 bedroom apartment in general runs around $1500/mo in Denver and in Lincoln it would run around $600/mo.

I love the scenery, climate and built environment in Metro Louisville. I wasn't impressed with the mentality of the people but other then that it is a good area with a good location.

I just took a short vacation to Tucson the extended stay hotel that was modern with a nice kitchen and newly remodeled was $31 a night. I am sure parking costs in some major cities are that much.

The gap in motels, hotels, apartment, housing costs, property costs is amazing from one area to another. Especially since it's mainly the same chains and the same internet where ever one goes.

It is incredible how the Midwest seems to be immune from speculative price increases. The gap from one part of the country is incredible.

I have noticed many of the middle-sized Midwestern metropolitan areas like Omaha, Wichita, Oklahoma City and Lincoln have seen very small rent increases over the last decade.

The whole country is mainly chains anyway and all metropolitan areas have good internet access where jobs can be done in many cases from home, so it is incredible how the gap between places Southern Indiana and New York/San Francisco has never been wider.

In these gentrified cities, its just a bunch of people staring at smartphones or in expensive coffee-shops staring at laptops anyway.

Last edited by lovecrowds; 08-17-2016 at 06:24 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-17-2016, 08:29 PM
 
3,974 posts, read 3,508,685 times
Reputation: 6405
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post

It is incredible how the Midwest seems to be immune from speculative price increases. The gap from one part of the country is incredible.

I have noticed many of the middle-sized Midwestern metropolitan areas like Omaha, Wichita, Oklahoma City and Lincoln have seen very small rent increases over the last decade.

The whole country is mainly chains anyway and all metropolitan areas have good internet access where jobs can be done in many cases from home, so it is incredible how the gap between places Southern Indiana and New York/San Francisco has never been wider.

In these gentrified cities, its just a bunch of people staring at smartphones or in expensive coffee-shops staring at laptops anyway.
This has not been the case at all in Grand Rapids In 2005 a 2 bedroom went for $658 according to the link: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datas...land%2C+MI+MSA

Most 2 bedrooms are starting around $1200 in the city, and not much cheaper in the metro. I guess it's not a dramatic increase, and it's still cheaper than the "gentrifying cities". But rents here have really started to climb fast, especially with all of these new big developments in the core.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2016, 08:48 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
12,664 posts, read 15,110,104 times
Reputation: 12218
I was renting a 2 bedroom/2 bathroom condo in Sunnyvale, CA in 2000 for $1930 a month. In 2016, that place rents for $3400.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2016, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,700 posts, read 17,660,009 times
Reputation: 27772
Just think about how much more carefully credit and references are checked
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2016, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,700 posts, read 17,660,009 times
Reputation: 27772
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Wow, excellent. The middle of the country in general is the part of the country that people have much more common sense when it comes to what a house or apartment should be.

I know the employer I worked at had the same wage in Denver as it did in Lincoln, Nebraska. The wage wasn't the best but unlimited overtime.

A 2 bedroom apartment in general runs around $1500/mo in Denver and in Lincoln it would run around $600/mo.

I love the scenery, climate and built environment in Metro Louisville. I wasn't impressed with the mentality of the people but other then that it is a good area with a good location.

I just took a short vacation to Tucson the extended stay hotel that was modern with a nice kitchen and newly remodeled was $31 a night. I am sure parking costs in some major cities are that much.

The gap in motels, hotels, apartment, housing costs, property costs is amazing from one area to another. Especially since it's mainly the same chains and the same internet where ever one goes.

It is incredible how the Midwest seems to be immune from speculative price increases. The gap from one part of the country is incredible.

I have noticed many of the middle-sized Midwestern metropolitan areas like Omaha, Wichita, Oklahoma City and Lincoln have seen very small rent increases over the last decade.

The whole country is mainly chains anyway and all metropolitan areas have good internet access where jobs can be done in many cases from home, so it is incredible how the gap between places Southern Indiana and New York/San Francisco has never been wider.

In these gentrified cities, its just a bunch of people staring at smartphones or in expensive coffee-shops staring at laptops anyway.
Most professional jobs are clustering in major metros, not in the cheap areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2016, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,239 posts, read 1,422,387 times
Reputation: 1689
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
It is interesting how much real estate has changed since 2000...,

I saw some fair-market rents from 2000.

Los Angeles.....Year 2000......Studio FMR $505 1 BEDROOM FMR $605

Denver.....Studio FMR $458 1 BEDROOM $547

San Diego....Studio FMR $563 1 BEDROOM: $643

San Francisco: STUDIO FMR: $832 1 BEDROOM: $1077
My own anecdotes from the 1990s:

Chicago (Wicker Park when it was cheap) 1BR for 385/ month

New York (Gramercy Park) 2BR for 1650/ month

Boston (Beacon Hill) 1BR for 1000/ month (which everyone thought was super expensive)

All of those places would be 3x the price today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2016, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,517,361 times
Reputation: 1861
!!!! This is why rents are so freaking ridiculous.

Single-Family and Multifamily Starts: Long-Run Trends | Eye On Housing

Can someone please explain to me why multi-family construction is today 3 to 4 times LOWER than it was back in the 70s and 80s??

This is ridiculous and needs to be addressed!! Renting was cheap in the past because there were many rentals being built. Our population grows by millions each year and there are not enough multi-family housing units.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2016, 12:54 PM
 
792 posts, read 440,332 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
!!!! This is why rents are so freaking ridiculous.

Single-Family and Multifamily Starts: Long-Run Trends | Eye On Housing

Can someone please explain to me why multi-family construction is today 3 to 4 times LOWER than it was back in the 70s and 80s??

This is ridiculous and needs to be addressed!! Renting was cheap in the past because there were many rentals being built. Our population grows by millions each year and there are not enough multi-family housing units.
That's odd.....because it seems like multi-family housing units are the main thing being built around here. Of course, they're also considered "luxury" units.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2016, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,517,361 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diane de Poitiers View Post
That's odd.....because it seems like multi-family housing units are the main thing being built around here. Of course, they're also considered "luxury" units.
Exactly. Nothing that the working class and middle class people can afford. We need apartments to be built at a level like they were back in the 70s and 80s. I've been apartment hunting and all the places where working class people live were built in the 70s and 80s. And rents in those places too is through the roof because of lack of supply.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2016, 01:24 PM
 
3,974 posts, read 3,508,685 times
Reputation: 6405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Exactly. Nothing that the working class and middle class people can afford. We need apartments to be built at a level like they were back in the 70s and 80s. I've been apartment hunting and all the places where working class people live were built in the 70s and 80s. And rents in those places too is through the roof because of lack of supply.


I think one of the issues with that is the cost of constructing these places has also skyrocketed. I'm not saying it's the only reason, but it's hard to charge $600-$700/mo for a unit when it costs $30-$40 million to develop the property. The only ones in Grand Rapids that get built are through gov't tax credits. I'm sure it's the same everywhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top