U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-09-2008, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,343 posts, read 55,140,686 times
Reputation: 15408

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by torchwoodchi View Post
I don't me to be a snob. However, I know what you mean. In Chi there are 4 french [LEFT]vietnames
restaurant[/LEFT]
in the loop. Now where outside of N.Y. or Chi are you going to find any french [LEFT]vienames
restaurants[/LEFT]
. The list goes on and on.
French Vietnamese is not new, in fact its pretty old in The Bay Area.

Le Cheval in Oakland is very good and going strong since 1985.



In fact, probably the best French Vietnamese restaurant in the Entire Country is The Slanted Door in San Francisco. Just Superb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-09-2008, 10:02 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,865,018 times
Reputation: 1668
18Montclair - It would make sense (in my mind at least) that SF and the West Coast would probably have the longest tradition and the best selection of Asian restaurants in the US just given the history of Asian immigration to the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,343 posts, read 55,140,686 times
Reputation: 15408
Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
18Montclair - It would make sense (in my mind at least) that SF and the West Coast would probably have the longest tradition and the best selection of Asian restaurants in the US just given the history of Asian immigration to the US.
At the same time, I have not been able to find a deep dish pizza here that even comes close to what I had in Chicago.

Im getting hungry now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 10:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,470 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by torchwoodchi View Post
I don't me to be a snob. However, I know what you mean. In Chi there are 4 french vietnamese restaurant in the loop. Now where outside of N.Y. or Chi are you going to find any french vietnamese restaurants. The list goes on and on.
wow thatt was a fairly dumb statement seeing as The Slanted Door is basically the end all be all of french viet restaurants...and thats in San Francisco

along with many many other in the Bay

why do midwesterners feel the need to seem so "cultured" ... people from Cali actually live amongst diversity throughout the whole state, we don't boners for "ethnic enclaves" and " strange foods(anything from asia basically)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 10:36 AM
 
1,992 posts, read 6,033,969 times
Reputation: 805
Quote:
Originally Posted by torchwoodchi View Post
I know, some people aren't cut-out for the hustle and bustle, for the bright lights, big city, for the fast lane, etc. Actually, I have friend who owns a farm in Wyoming and when I visit him I sometimes find myself thinking it would be nice to live there. THEN I PUT DOWN THE BOTTLE!(the only way to handle the boredom) and sober up. LOL. Just playing with you. Seriously, to each his or her own. For me Boston, Atlanta and San Francisco are place you go to get out of the fast lane for a few days, because in these places it feels like everything is in slow-motion(in Chi we want things done yesterday). That can be very refreshing from time to time.
That's odd considering San Francisco is more dense and just as urban as Chicago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 10:40 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,865,018 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_wesside View Post

why do midwesterners feel the need to seem so "cultured" ... people from Cali actually live amongst diversity throughout the whole state, we don't boners for "ethnic enclaves" and " strange foods(anything from asia basically)
What do you mean by this statement? I'm honestly confused, please expound further.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 11:02 AM
 
3,597 posts, read 7,704,551 times
Reputation: 2878
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgb123 View Post
I think the bigger differences will be cultural. I think school would be a lot different on the east coast. where are you from? What are you currently used to? What does "better" mean to you?

Generally speaking, students at east coast schools can be more competitive. Chicago is a bigger city but east coast cities have a bigger attitude in my opinion.
Ha! Spoken like someone who's never lived in Chicago, gone to school in Chicago or been shivved in the ribs with a pencil at a school library in Chicago.

Chicago is intensely competitive. Detrimentally, even. Boston is a mild pinch on the elbow in comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hillside View Post
both cities are nice and world-class

if you are hispanic/black, culturally, chicago might be the best bet

if you hate the winter and what bad weather a lake brings, boston is definitely a little milder despite the occasional nor'easter

boston is cleaner

chicago is more lively

2 great choices
This isn't true. Chicago is much cleaner. And, due to its geographical location, Chicago also doesn't smell of fish.

Mind you, I love Boston to death and think it's an awesome city. But for "city" it just doesn't compete with Chicago. It's a very, very small place for being so close to NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 11:12 AM
 
3,597 posts, read 7,704,551 times
Reputation: 2878
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_wesside View Post

why do midwesterners feel the need to seem so "cultured" ... people from Cali actually live amongst diversity throughout the whole state, we don't boners for "ethnic enclaves" and " strange foods(anything from asia basically)
Because people from Chicago (the midwesterners you're generalizing) have unparalleled access to micro-ethnic centers throughout the nation, with the very obvious exception of NYC. It would be hard to consider life without it. It's centralized to specific neighborhoods (New Yorkers and Chicagoans can tell you specifically what streets border which ethnic neighborhoods) and it's simply a way of life... Being able to follow whatever one desires for dinner that evening to a specific part of the city.

Just about the only thing I considered "strange" in Chicago were the fusion restaurants; fusion started and soared there.

Until you've eaten a plaid cookie that tasted like roast beef, I just don't want to hear you try and define what "strange food" really is.

So with respect to that... That's why. California certainly has its ethnic enclaves, but like everything else here, it's overwhelmingly suburbanized. Access is randomly distributed throughout the metropolitan area. It's also not as varied as what you find in Chicagoland or the greater NYC metropolitan area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2008, 11:43 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,366,973 times
Reputation: 10919
^ yeah, that's kinda funny. When I moved here from Iowa I told my parents I lived in a hispanic neighborhood, but we butted up right against the Polish neighborhood. My mom commented on how everyone seemed hispanic, but for some reason she hadn't seen a single Polish person. I pointed up the street and said "oh, you have to cross that intersection to get to the Polish neighborhood". They laughed, but I fairly quickly walked them up Milwaukee Ave, and within 10 minutes or so all the signs on the buildings and everyone hussling around were Polish.

It was very strange compared to Iowa, where even if there's ever a change in the ethnic mix of a neighborhood, it takes many blocks to really feel the change.

It's bizarre here that a 2 lane street can be such a steadfast boundry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2008, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,319,060 times
Reputation: 1082
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwine View Post
Ha! Spoken like someone who's never lived in Chicago, gone to school in Chicago or been shivved in the ribs with a pencil at a school library in Chicago.

Chicago is intensely competitive. Detrimentally, even. Boston is a mild pinch on the elbow in comparison.



This isn't true. Chicago is much cleaner. And, due to its geographical location, Chicago also doesn't smell of fish.

Mind you, I love Boston to death and think it's an awesome city. But for "city" it just doesn't compete with Chicago. It's a very, very small place for being so close to NYC.
Boston has half the size of Chicago.
Chicago has half the flavor of Boston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top