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Old 12-31-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,464 posts, read 7,529,757 times
Reputation: 4363

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetclimber View Post
This whole thing with how liberal a place is is played out! I don't know what the big fuss is all about with liberal. They say they are soooo openminded, but there are alot of issues they are closeminded on. Religion is one, I mean how come Chistianity is so bad? If you were truly openminded, you would accept christianity instead of bashing it. Liberals are no more openminded than most conservatives. That being said, New York city is probably the most "liberal" metro in the US. To finish though, although I like NYC, if being a liberal area is so great, how come NYC is also one of the most segregated regions if liberals are soooo great?
As others have noted, historic development patterns in older metro areas have absolutely NOTHING to do with the prevailing political ideology of an area. I will agree that it seems somewhat ironic that many socially liberal cities/ares tend to be segregated, but this has to do with very old self-segregation practices stemming from the days of immigration in which people tended to settle in neighborhoods with ethnic backgrounds similar to them.

Granted, there was also a fair amount of institutionalized racism as far as not giving minority families the loans required to live in certain neighborhoods or landlords discriminating against tenants -- but again, this is largely rooted in the past. Metro areas in the Sun Belt tend not to have this type of de facto segregation since they have developed mostly post-Jim Crow. Nevertheless, minority families are making great strides in leaving urban areas and integrating more suburban areas; I expect the 2010 Census to reflect this shift. Metropolitan New York and Los Angeles will certainly not be an exception to this.

As far as answering the OP, the nation's largest metro areas tend to be consistently socially liberal, not coincidentally because of the greater amount of diversity and general "acceptance" that more urban areas tend to offer. Personally, although I am left-of-center, I enjoy being surrounded by people with a mixture of beliefs.

Last edited by Duderino; 12-31-2008 at 12:28 PM..
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Old 12-31-2008, 12:20 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,456,702 times
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^Good post. The "segregation" in cities like NYC and Chicago has to be understood and placed in historical context. While there may have been (and may still be) some animosity between racial/ethnic groups, both cities have sizeable numbers of successful minorities today, so it seems like at this point the segregation perpetuates itself more out of habit and out of a desire to hold tight to certain traditions and history than out of old attitudes still lingering. The upside is that it's made for interesting ethnic neighborhoods you won't find in the sunbelt cities. One thing I admire about New Yorkers and Chicagoans is that they seem to have such a strong sense of themselves and firm grasp on their city's past. You won't find this allegiance to a city down south so much, with the possible exception of New Orleans. Now some cities up north still seem to segregate based on some lingering attitudes regarding other races. Detroit, I'm looking at you.

Last edited by houstoner; 12-31-2008 at 12:29 PM.. Reason: grammatical error
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Old 12-31-2008, 03:14 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,909,420 times
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Minneapolis, Minnesota without a doubt.
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Old 12-31-2008, 03:20 PM
 
56,676 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
^Good post. The "segregation" in cities like NYC and Chicago has to be understood and placed in historical context. While there may have been (and may still be) some animosity between racial/ethnic groups, both cities have sizeable numbers of successful minorities today, so it seems like at this point the segregation perpetuates itself more out of habit and out of a desire to hold tight to certain traditions and history than out of old attitudes still lingering. The upside is that it's made for interesting ethnic neighborhoods you won't find in the sunbelt cities. One thing I admire about New Yorkers and Chicagoans is that they seem to have such a strong sense of themselves and firm grasp on their city's past. You won't find this allegiance to a city down south so much, with the possible exception of New Orleans. Now some cities up north still seem to segregate based on some lingering attitudes regarding other races. Detroit, I'm looking at you.
Sad, but true about Detroit. It seems like the riots just happen a little while ago for them and ironically, it involved both Blacks and Whites that had roots in the South in 1967.
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Old 12-31-2008, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Virgin Islands
594 posts, read 1,243,629 times
Reputation: 586
The Duggars Household
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Old 01-01-2009, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,694,755 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
^Good post. The "segregation" in cities like NYC and Chicago has to be understood and placed in historical context. While there may have been (and may still be) some animosity between racial/ethnic groups, both cities have sizeable numbers of successful minorities today, so it seems like at this point the segregation perpetuates itself more out of habit and out of a desire to hold tight to certain traditions and history than out of old attitudes still lingering. The upside is that it's made for interesting ethnic neighborhoods you won't find in the sunbelt cities. One thing I admire about New Yorkers and Chicagoans is that they seem to have such a strong sense of themselves and firm grasp on their city's past. You won't find this allegiance to a city down south so much, with the possible exception of New Orleans. Now some cities up north still seem to segregate based on some lingering attitudes regarding other races. Detroit, I'm looking at you.
Well according to people up north, our cities have NO history.
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Old 01-01-2009, 12:58 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,008,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
The tag line stated socially liberal. So no, I am not kidding. Wisconsin tends to be politcally conservative, but socially liberal. Getting drunk, bar stool races, shooting bees with a shoot gun, cities/towns with more bars then churches, yup--pretty darn liberal.
That doesn't make a town socially liberal. When people say socially liberal, they are talking about social/moral issues like abortion and gay marriage. I live in TN and there are pleanty of bars and people that drink, but it's definately not socially liberal.
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:13 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
I read that article too, and one thing that I found interesting was that cities that were established and settled prior to the civil rights movement found themselves in a situation in with segregation is entrenched and a bit hard to get rid of as it becomes self-perpetuating. as such, the newer sunbelt cities tend to be more integrated as they were built after covenants and redlining so neighborhoods were not as firmly established along ethnic and/or racial lines (when the Chicago tribune ran the article it interviewed a wealthy white person who relocated to chicago and chose the neighborhood one would expect a wealthy white person to chose because he stated he knew people there, it then interviewed a wealthy african american person who relocated to chicago for business reasons who chose to move to a wealthy african american neighborhood for the same exact reasons the white person choose to move to the neighborhood he ended up in). As far as ethnic neighborhoods are concerned, I used to work with a girl who moved to Chicago from Poland when she was a teenager and they specifically chose to live in a Polish neighborhood for the simple reason that they knew that there would be other people in the neighborhood who spoke Polish (they didn't really speak English when they moved here), and they relied on their neighbors and neighborhood community centers to help them learn the ropes of living in the US (and to learn English). She no longer lives in that neighborhood and has since moved out to the suburbs, but ethnic neighborhoods serve a very distinct purpose in helping new immigrants establish themselves in the US and have a long history of doing exactly that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
^Good post. The "segregation" in cities like NYC and Chicago has to be understood and placed in historical context. While there may have been (and may still be) some animosity between racial/ethnic groups, both cities have sizeable numbers of successful minorities today, so it seems like at this point the segregation perpetuates itself more out of habit and out of a desire to hold tight to certain traditions and history than out of old attitudes still lingering. The upside is that it's made for interesting ethnic neighborhoods you won't find in the sunbelt cities. One thing I admire about New Yorkers and Chicagoans is that they seem to have such a strong sense of themselves and firm grasp on their city's past. You won't find this allegiance to a city down south so much, with the possible exception of New Orleans. Now some cities up north still seem to segregate based on some lingering attitudes regarding other races. Detroit, I'm looking at you.
I'm familiar with the above, and it's true of my hometown of Pittsburgh as well. However, I feel these ethnic enclaves outlive their usefulness if people feel they HAVE to live in Chinatown, Little Italy, etc.

Denver doesn't have much of any of that today; it used to have a Little Italy but except for the great-grandmas and grandpas, the succeeding generations have moved to the burbs (mostly the west burbs b/c Little Italy was on the west side).
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Old 01-01-2009, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,051,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
Maybe for gays, but that's probably it. As for tolerance of other races, not just cultures, but other races, that's basically it, TOLERANCE! Now genuine acceptance for some minorities by liberals (in the part of the country I'm in) is a whole other story.

When people talk of tolerance and promoting it these days, its pretty much about the gay issue, and maybe atheism. There are a ton of other minorities and belief systems that are not tolerated in this country, and nobody even blinks an eye at it because people are so zoned in on gays.
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Old 01-01-2009, 02:37 PM
 
Location: btw Bmore and DC but in the Bmore Metro Stat Area
659 posts, read 1,836,233 times
Reputation: 138
any comments on Bmore?
how does it compare to cleveland, st louis, philly, pitt?
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