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Old 01-01-2009, 03:01 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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I would think that Philadelphia is liberal.
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Old 01-01-2009, 03:58 PM
 
Location: O'Hare International Airport
351 posts, read 541,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Oh yeah, I would say, San Fran., Portland, Seattle, NYC, Boston, Denver, Columbus OH and most college towns across the country.
There's an ENORMOUS difference between Columbus and Denver--both middle American cities--on the one hand, and freaking San Francisico and Boston on the other.
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Old 01-01-2009, 04:38 PM
 
56,633 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm familiar with the above, and it's true of my hometown of Pittsburgh as well. However, I feel these ethnic enclaves outlive their usefulness if people feel they HAVE to live in Chinatown, Little Italy, etc.

Denver doesn't have much of any of that today; it used to have a Little Italy but except for the great-grandmas and grandpas, the succeeding generations have moved to the burbs (mostly the west burbs b/c Little Italy was on the west side).
Sounds like Syracuse too. Our Tipperary Hill section is on the West end of the city and many of the people that came from that neighborhood moved to the Western suburbs. Our "little Italy"/major Italian section is on the Northside and most moved to the Northern suburbs. Same for Germans who also were mainly on the Northside. One exception sort of is that many of the Black suburbanites also live in the Northern suburbs, but that might be due more to the many apartments and the former presence of an Air Force base in that area. Eventhough our city's Southside and many Eastside neighborhoods are where most Blacks live, there are good amounts in Eastern suburbs and the only South suburb(Nedrow).
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Southern suburb of Minneapolis/St. Paul
26 posts, read 103,634 times
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strictly SOCIALLY liberal: bay area (san francisco, berkeley, oakland, san jose), portland, seattle, minneapolis/st. paul, atlanta, new york, and boston. There are other very liberal metros, but they would be more fiscally liberal and socially moderate or socially conservative (populist)
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,318,361 times
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Minneapolis/St. Paul is not strictly liberal, unfortunately. There are many conservatives here and we almost elected a "red" governor. People with money often vote conservatively to protect it, and there is a lot of money here.
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Old 12-24-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,055,722 times
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The Twin Cities are an interesting case because they used to be very liberal politically but socially conservative. The cities proper are still very liberal politically but the metro as a whole has become more moderate. At the same time though it seems like the area has become very socially liberal compared to how it used to be, especially in regards to sex, but also towards things like recreational drugs, and Minnesotans have always loved to drink. This change in social attitudes seemed to accelerate through the 90s and the last decade.

I grew up out east, when I take my friends from back home around town here they are often surprised by the things they witness, and the scene in general.
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
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The whole sf bay area is full of crazy liberals and socialist iv even seen a couple fools with communist bumper stickers flags and t shirts
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
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Denver is a very socially liberal area. Even moreso when you add in Boulder, Fort Collins, and the high mountain towns - the latter of which are so liberal (more socially than fiscally) it's borderline ridiculous.
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,524,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgrizzard707 View Post
The whole sf bay area is full of crazy liberals and socialist iv even seen a couple fools with communist bumper stickers flags and t shirts
Don't take them all seriously - I have a Communist Russia t-shirt that I wear just for laughs. And one of my friends who goes to BYU has a t-shirt with the USSR's famous leaders with party hats on and drinking vodka, which of course literally means "Communist party." It's pretty funny. Chillax, dude!
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,318,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
The Twin Cities are an interesting case because they used to be very liberal politically but socially conservative. The cities proper are still very liberal politically but the metro as a whole has become more moderate. At the same time though it seems like the area has become very socially liberal compared to how it used to be, especially in regards to sex, but also towards things like recreational drugs, and Minnesotans have always loved to drink. This change in social attitudes seemed to accelerate through the 90s and the last decade.

I grew up out east, when I take my friends from back home around town here they are often surprised by the things they witness, and the scene in general.
Just curious....how so?
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