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Old 08-25-2016, 04:35 PM
 
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Lake Jackson, TX a small town that's an hour drive to Pearland and outer Houston. It is right on the coast, also look at some other exurban areas of Houston, like northern Conroe, TX.
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Old 08-25-2016, 06:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you move south, you will be complaining about the lack of job opportunities and politics. Virginia is a liberal state with lots of rural in the central part of the state. It would be colder than 50 in the winter, but better than MA.
The downside with winter is VA is they are completely unprepared for anything. The one year I lived there we had 1 major snowstorm and it was like the apocalypse. Started around 4pm and I was stuck at work until 1am until the roads were somewhat clear enough to drive. People tried to leave at 6pm and showed back up at work 2 hours later after only making it 2 miles away and coming back. When I finally drove home at 1 am 495 was littered with abandoned cars that ran out of gas, many in middle lanes of the freeway. And then it took a good week to clear all of the snow from the local surface roads and neighborhoods. Growing up in MA this completely blew my mind because in New England they have a fleet of plows on the road from the moment the snow hits the ground until it stops
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Old 08-26-2016, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,238 posts, read 1,307,063 times
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Originally Posted by oceansaway33 View Post
Thank you!

We have horses, so we do need the land. The land is one aspect that we are are not willing to compromise at all. Id rather give up other points on our list, to be honest. It is tough because there are areas in New England that meet all requirements, except for the weather.

I will check out Hillsborough, definitely. Those temperatures are tolerable, I think. Reminds me a lot of where we lived in Georgia, which was really nice in terms of climate.

Does anyone think areas of Virginia, Oregon, or Washington might work for us?
Try Virginia Maryland or Delaware
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Old 08-26-2016, 10:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tovarisch View Post
If it weren't for the weather thing, I'd say stay in Mass. and come out to the Northampton area! Meets pretty much all of your needs otherwise. BUT -- how about Ashland or Corvallis, OR?
Ashland isn't particularly green - it's more California-brown half of the year.

But neither Corvallis nor Ashland works in terms of the OP's criteria:

jobs - not really (OP's education is a plus, but lots of people with degrees fighting for the few non-service jobs that are there)
3 acres suitable for horses for 200-250k proximate to where jobs _might_ be if you can get one - tough ask
cultural diversity - meh

Not to mention Corvallis will be under 50 for much of the winter (damp, windy and 35-45F temps). Warmer than MA in the winter, but 2-3 months where it will be under 50 frequently.
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Old 08-26-2016, 11:11 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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Originally Posted by blueskywalker View Post
I was thinking Ashland as well.
Not sure if they afford property there though.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...k1.uACAD3Ob3LI >>> Images for Rogue Valley, Oregon

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...ashland+oregon >>> Images of Ashland, Oregon

Because of Oregon's urban growth boundaries, acreage tends to be outside of town and on the expensive side. The plus side of the urban growth boundary is that it prevents the cities from sprawling into each other and keeps farmlands intact. The minus is that it tends to make land more expensive and the "just a couple acres" properties rarer as the big farms can't be split up into housing subdivisions or, as they are called in the west "ranchette subdivisions" of small acreage horse properties.

Not to say that there aren't any, just that they are out of town proper and not very common. In Ashland and the Rogue Valley, wineries, orchards (and now pot farms) vie for the acreages and water rights, so acreage with water rights tend to be very expensive.
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Old 08-26-2016, 11:14 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
Ashland isn't particularly green - it's more California-brown half of the year.
The valley splits - the east side is open rolling hills/mountains with scattered oaks and grasslands that go brown in the summer (much like parts of northern California, from Redding down to about Corning) and the west side, which is in the shadow of the Coast Range, is more densely treed and greener in the summer. Driving down I-5, you can really see the difference in the hills to the west or east.
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Old 08-26-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,611 posts, read 1,364,190 times
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All the time I was reading your criteria I was thinking, "West coast." In particular, the northwest. There are some really nice small towns in Washington State that you might consider. The further north you go, the easier it would be to get what you wanted in a decent price range.

Another rather offbeat suggestion is central/southern Texas, well west of Houston. The Hill Country is beautiful and temperate in the winter (but hot in the summer) and altho pricey it does not compare with California for price. Probably the one thing that wouldn't meet your criteria there is "liberal/moderate."
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
The valley splits - the east side is open rolling hills/mountains with scattered oaks and grasslands that go brown in the summer (much like parts of northern California, from Redding down to about Corning) and the west side, which is in the shadow of the Coast Range, is more densely treed and greener in the summer. Driving down I-5, you can really see the difference in the hills to the west or east.
True. And your point is well-taken.

I was going for less of an absolute brown/green and more on a spectrum of New England summer (deep green) vs. California summer (brown) and even with the greenery that is there, it's going to look pretty different to someone from New England.

Being a native New Englander myself, even after nearly two decades in Oregon I still look at Ashland (and even moreso north through Talent/Medford) as arid and brown, even walking in the treed parks of Jacksonville. Lithia Park maybe a bit less so because of the river.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:29 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,301 posts, read 15,356,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
True. And your point is well-taken.

I was going for less of an absolute brown/green and more on a spectrum of New England summer (deep green) vs. California summer (brown) and even with the greenery that is there, it's going to look pretty different to someone from New England.

Being a native New Englander myself, even after nearly two decades in Oregon I still look at Ashland (and even moreso north through Talent/Medford) as arid and brown, even walking in the treed parks of Jacksonville. Lithia Park maybe a bit less so because of the river.
I like the fact that there is a climate divide in the valley - it is sort of like the drive over the Cascades (say over Mt Hood from Portland to Warm Springs), where you go from firs and a forest floor of ferns on the west side to Ponderosa pines and more open, drier forest floor on the east. Sometimes that divide is sharp, it happens in less than a half mile. Sort of the way, driving west from the Klamath Basin past Lake of the Woods, the manzanita go from low mounded bushes to medium-height trees - same plant, just different climate.
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