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Old 08-17-2016, 10:58 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Wait. Aren't you arguing in another thread that "the south is too warm for deciduous trees" ... ?

The South Is Too Warm For Deciduous Trees: Am I Right?
I never said that the South didn't have deciduous trees, only that the deciduous trees were Ice Age relics, and that the region was too warm for them to be the environmental mainstay (in favor of broadleaf evergreens).
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Old 08-18-2016, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, Isanti County, MN
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Are you kidding me? PITTSBURGH! Hands down!
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Old 08-18-2016, 01:17 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyryztoll View Post
Are you kidding me? PITTSBURGH! Hands down!
I think what most people in this thread don't understand is that although areas such as Seattle, Pittsburgh, Philly, and NYC are in regions with densely covered tree biomes, the cities themselves don't really represent that; especially in comparison with cities that display large amounts of tree cover. Pittsburgh, just like the other cities mentioned have highly populated areas where large amounts of tree cover are nonexistent, while in cities like Atlanta it pretty much covers the entire city, even in areas like Midtown.
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Old 08-18-2016, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Minneapolis may not have as much tree cover as some of the cities in the southeast but it is incredibly lush. It is, after all, in the middle of some of the most fertile farmland on earth. Photos are mine:


mplsjul201525 by Andrew Smith, on Flickr


mplsjul201502 by Andrew Smith, on Flickr


mplsjul201511 by Andrew Smith, on Flickr
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Old 08-18-2016, 03:58 AM
 
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My city is hands down most greenest, and it's the perfect shade of super lush green. I'd post a pic, but the green is just too hands down intense.
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Old 08-20-2016, 06:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie1070 View Post
Not green like energy saving or recycling but when it comes to nature. I think Seattle would be one of them because of the many forests and lakes that surround the area.
Seattle has another advantage over places like Atlanta. Seattle's grass stays green all winter, but when I was in Atlanta in February, we were shocked at how brown everything looked. I think Seattle looks substantially greener in winter because of the green grass and the greater percentage of evergreen trees and shrubs (broadleaf as well as coniferous). In summer, I'd expect that Atlanta would look greener since that's the season that Seattle's grass is brown (though the deciduous trees are of course still green).
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Old 08-20-2016, 07:43 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
The Piedmont is tree-filled, but nearly all the trees go bare in winter, making for a dead landscape. The other two regions have large amounts of greenery that is seen year-round.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
the dominant tree in atlanta is pine so can't say it is that stark in the winter.
True. Most of Georgia has similar greenish-brown hue in winter that you'll find in Southeast Texas, which has plently of deciduous trees. Those vast swamps and marshes go mostly bare in winter.
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Old 08-20-2016, 08:43 PM
 
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Deciduous trees in much of the South = Ice Age relics. They will be replaced by more appropriate trees, like conifers (pines, junipers, etc) and broadleaf evergreens, as the soils acidify and lose nutrients over the years.
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Old 08-20-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Deciduous trees in much of the South = Ice Age relics. They will be replaced by more appropriate trees, like conifers (pines, junipers, etc) and broadleaf evergreens, as the soils acidify and lose nutrients over the years.
I think the bald cypress is very appropriate, and I love the spooky look those forests give in winter.

I'd like to see cities like Houston replenish its natural magnolia landscape. I prefer them to live oaks.
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Old 08-20-2016, 09:31 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
I think the bald cypress is very appropriate, and I love the spooky look those forests give in winter.
You are right, they do look interesting in many contexts, and can be planted more. There is a tropical evergreen relative of the bald cypress, known as the montezuma cypress, which grows naturally throughout Mexico, and can take winter temperatures down to around 10F; those are also good to plant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
I'd like to see cities like Houston replenish its natural magnolia landscape. I prefer them to live oaks.
They were a prominent tree in the area; no wonder why they called Houston the "Magnolia City."
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