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View Poll Results: Is The South Too Warm For Deciduous Trees?
Yes 1 2.78%
No 35 97.22%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-16-2016, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
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QUESTION TO THE OP: Where do you live? Have you ever even BEEN to the south? The whole premise of this thread is absurd.

 
Old 08-16-2016, 11:30 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post

The South Is Too Warm For Deciduous Trees: Am I Right?

No, you are wrong.

Just by saying "the South" you are wrong because large parts of the South does loose it leaves. Even if you have never been there in the Winter, you can still use common sense and realize that some parts of the South can get quite cold. At the very least, the states of the Upper South and along the Appalachian Mountains.

https://weather.com/maps/fall-foliage (Fall Foliage Map - note it includes at least half the South)

You should have said parts of the South and then maybe you would be right.



Fall Color Like Never Before - Southern Living (Southern Fall Color)

Fall Color in the Carolinas : Extension : Clemson University : South Carolina (fall colors of the Carolinas)

Alabama's Official Travel Guide - Alabama.Travel - Local Tips for Your Alabama Vacation (Alabama Fall Color Trail)

Fall In Virginia - Virginia Is For Lovers (Fall in Virginia)

Best Places to See Fall Foliage - Fall Festivals in KY - Kentucky ColorFall (Kentucky)

Best Places to See Fall Foliage - Fall Vacations - Arkansas Fall Foliage (Arkansas Fall Foliage)
Basically, the point is that, though deciduous trees are present in the South, the climate for much of the region is far too warm to warrant the dormancy deciduous trees go through. The cold seen in the South is neither severe, nor long enough for deciduous trees.

Areas of East Asia that are colder in winter, on average, than many areas of South, are basically evergreen jungles:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jejudo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotjawal_Forest
 
Old 08-16-2016, 11:37 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
QUESTION TO THE OP: Where do you live? Have you ever even BEEN to the south? The whole premise of this thread is absurd.
How? Deciduous trees lose their leaves to endure long, cold winters; winters in the South are hardly long and cold.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
How? Deciduous trees lose their leaves to endure long, cold winters; winters in the South are hardly long and cold.
You didn't answer my questions.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
Reputation: 9513
And your whole premise is wrong. The chemical process that sheds leaves from trees is triggered by a decline in sunlight (the shortening of days), not the cold. Also, except for Southern Florida, freezing temperatures are common throughout the South -- even the coasts. That it doesn't stay below freezing all winter long makes no difference in whether trees drop thier leaves or not. Those plants in the South that do keep their leaves and don't go dormant in winter (like orange trees, and flowering shrubs, for example) have to be protected from freezes or else they'll die. THAT is why deciduous trees drop their leaves even in the South -- to keep from dying from the cold.

Why Leaves Really Fall Off Trees : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
 
Old 08-17-2016, 01:11 AM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
You didn't answer my questions.
I don't need to; they are irrelevant to the main point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
And your whole premise is wrong. The chemical process that sheds leaves from trees is triggered by a decline in sunlight (the shortening of days), not the cold.
I know this; if you look at the thread I linked, you will see that I already made such a statement, as seen here:
http://www.city-data.com/forum/45087220-post83.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Also, except for Southern Florida, freezing temperatures are common throughout the South -- even the coasts. That it doesn't stay below freezing all winter long makes no difference in whether trees drop thier leaves or not. Those plants in the South that do keep their leaves and don't go dormant in winter (like orange trees, and flowering shrubs, for example) have to be protected from freezes or else they'll die. THAT is why deciduous trees drop their leaves even in the South -- to keep from dying from the cold.

Why Leaves Really Fall Off Trees : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
False. Just because there are freezes in winter doesn't mean that it is cold enough for plants to have to lose their leaves. You have to look at the overall conditions during winter. That is, how severe are the freezes (both in magnitude and in duration)? How often do they occur?

There is a huge difference between a brief cold snap followed by temp rebounds, and actually having the entire winter consist of sustained freezing cold. You will find that temps of the former support evergreen landscapes; even though cold was present, it was brief, and not to strong magnitude, so winter conditions were overall too warm to warrant need for dormancy seen in deciduous trees. This is why you see that evergreen trees like live oaks, magnolias, and sabal palms, are native to the South, even with winter freezes.

The deciduous trees in the South are hold-overs from the Ice Age, and are ripe for replacement by evergreens. Soil leaching to an acidic pH enhances the process.

This is Gotjawal Forest in South Korea. It is an evergreen forest, even though average lows at the area are near freezing, because the warmer daytime temps, and lack of intense, sustained cold, means that conditions are left overall too warm for deciduous trees:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotjawal_Forest
 
Old 08-17-2016, 01:40 AM
 
Location: East of the Appaichans
325 posts, read 207,656 times
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One thing I noticed in the South is the large amount of pine trees from SE VA all the down to the Gulf coast. But I still have seen plenty of deciduous trees there.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,501 posts, read 1,352,502 times
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Cold epoch/The US south is a subtropical paradise troll
 
Old 08-17-2016, 01:59 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrltenSpke11 View Post
One thing I noticed in the South is the large amount of pine trees from SE VA all the down to the Gulf coast. But I still have seen plenty of deciduous trees there.
Those deciduous trees in the region are Ice Age relics, and will be replaced by evergreens (pines, live oaks, etc) in the future.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,574,904 times
Reputation: 27672
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Actually, I am arguing that, essentially, the entire South is too warm for the dormancy that deciduous trees go through every year. The cold spells are too brief.
Go into the mountains of western NC and they are tons and tons of deciduous trees. In places like Mt. Mitchell State Park in NC, the higher elevations have trees more in common with New England than lower elevation continental climates.
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