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View Poll Results: Is The South Too Warm For Deciduous Trees?
Yes 1 2.78%
No 35 97.22%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 08-17-2016, 06:39 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,022 times
Reputation: 151

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Almost 96% of us disagree with the OP but the OP is still right. Kind of like arguing with a sign board. Maybe we should just give the OP a sign. {sign} lol
Nobody who is voting 'no' is presenting good reasons backing up the decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
I live in the Charlotte area. I'm looking out my window right now at tons of deciduous trees in my backyard and the back end of my neighborhood. No matter what era of history they're from, etc., etc., etc., deciduous trees have flourished here in the South for many generations. I mean, I'm looking at them now, lol. Interesting thread, nonetheless.
Deciduous trees in much of the South are Ice Age relics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Data View Post
No, you're an idiot and you're addicted to humiliating yourself.

Go take a long walk.
I presented my evidence. Where is yours?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
???? So it's my eyesight that betrays me each year when the leaves change?
No, you are looking at Ice Age relics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
I just drove 265 miles from Atlanta to Savannah and there were "deciduous"' trees the whole way. In 3-4 months they'll all turn colors, lose their leaves and go bare (dormant). In March they'll sprout new mint green leaves. This has been going on FOR MILLIONS OF YEARS! I'm not worried.
And, in millions of years, it will be all evergreen.

 
Old 08-17-2016, 07:02 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,321 posts, read 3,002,075 times
Reputation: 4110
Where do people come up with this? The south is too warm for deciduous trees? WhWhaaaat? The Appalachians of western NC are colder in the winter usually then where I live in coastal MD so your saying NC's Appalachians are too warm?

Hell, I've seen plenty of these trees in Colombia! Not the Columbia in SC either but the country! I guess it's colder there then in our south, otherwise they wouldn't exist!
 
Old 08-17-2016, 07:07 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,321 posts, read 3,002,075 times
Reputation: 4110
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Only the highest mountains in the SE will have deciduous trees, but even lower elevations on the mountains (Asheville) are warm enough for evergreens.
Now evergreens need warmth? Based on that I now know how to dress when going to warm climate regions such as Alaska!
 
Old 08-17-2016, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,088 posts, read 1,069,501 times
Reputation: 1936
VIRAL, when every single person votes no on the point you're trying to make, it's time to reassess. If you're simply trying to say that evergreens will gradually replace deciduous trees, that's one thing. Lots of things will change in millions of years, perhaps there will be another ice age.... But saying that the climate is currently too warm to support deciduous trees is just incorrect and ridiculous. Are you actually arguing that people are misidentifying the trees in their own yards, cities, regions, etc.?
 
Old 08-17-2016, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,953,389 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
VIRAL, when every single person votes no on the point you're trying to make, it's time to reassess. If you're simply trying to say that evergreens will gradually replace deciduous trees, that's one thing. Lots of things will change in millions of years, perhaps there will be another ice age.... But saying that the climate is currently too warm to support deciduous trees is just incorrect and ridiculous. Are you actually arguing that people are misidentifying the trees in their own yards, cities, regions, etc.?
... and the OP still insists he's "right" ...
Attached Thumbnails
The South Is Too Warm For Deciduous Trees: Am I Right?-image.jpeg  
 
Old 08-17-2016, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,953,389 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Now evergreens need warmth? Based on that I now know how to dress when going to warm climate regions such as Alaska!
Yeah, last time I was in Western Montana there was nothing BUT evergreens! Guess that's changed in 5 years?
 
Old 08-17-2016, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Multi-tasking, learn it.



The deciduous trees in Hawaii aren't what I am referring to, since they will lose their leaves due to dry season/drought in leeward areas. The deciduous trees I am referring to in this thread are the "four-seasons" fall color deciduous trees.
I can multitask, but I don't post the same dribble in like 100 threads within a week lol.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
Reputation: 5637
Forget the mountains, deciduous trees are found all over the coastal south. The woods behind my grandmothers house in Bluffton, SC are full of sweet gum, maple, and ash trees that drop leaves every November.

Look at the cooperative extension website for any southern state, and you'll see plenty of native deciduous trees. Here's SC: http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hor..._strength.html

BTW, welcome back, Yn0hTnA.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 10:54 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,022 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Where do people come up with this? The south is too warm for deciduous trees? WhWhaaaat? The Appalachians of western NC are colder in the winter usually then where I live in coastal MD so your saying NC's Appalachians are too warm?

Hell, I've seen plenty of these trees in Colombia! Not the Columbia in SC either but the country! I guess it's colder there then in our south, otherwise they wouldn't exist!
When I say "too warm," I don't necessarily mean that the trees will die in the landscape in as much as I am saying that the trees will, eventually, be replaced by evergreens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Now evergreens need warmth? Based on that I now know how to dress when going to warm climate regions such as Alaska!
Broad-leaf evergreens (as well as subtropical/tropical conifers) do need winter warmth, or at least, not too severe of winters (in terms of magnitude and duration).

Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
VIRAL, when every single person votes no on the point you're trying to make, it's time to reassess. If you're simply trying to say that evergreens will gradually replace deciduous trees, that's one thing. Lots of things will change in millions of years, perhaps there will be another ice age.... But saying that the climate is currently too warm to support deciduous trees is just incorrect and ridiculous. Are you actually arguing that people are misidentifying the trees in their own yards, cities, regions, etc.?
Quote:
When I say "too warm," I don't necessarily mean that the trees will die in the landscape in as much as I am saying that the trees will, eventually, be replaced by evergreens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Forget the mountains, deciduous trees are found all over the coastal south. The woods behind my grandmothers house in Bluffton, SC are full of sweet gum, maple, and ash trees that drop leaves every November.

Look at the cooperative extension website for any southern state, and you'll see plenty of native deciduous trees. Here's SC: ?Trees of Strength? for South Carolina Landscapes : Extension : Clemson University : South Carolina

BTW, welcome back, Yn0hTnA.
Deciduous trees in the coastal South are either planted, or Ice Age relics.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 11:15 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,464 posts, read 14,307,686 times
Reputation: 23238
Pesky thing, that ice age. But I'm going to go out on a limb and say that if southern deciduous trees trees are an aberration that has lasted over a million years its pretty silly to say the current climate is too warm for them.
For all practical purposes the south currently supports deciduous trees just fine. Unless you are immortal you will never know it to be any different.
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