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View Poll Results: Is The South Too Warm For Deciduous Trees?
Yes 1 2.78%
No 35 97.22%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-16-2016, 09:33 PM
 
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In this thread here, there has been disagreement as to whether or not the South was too warm for deciduous trees to exist. I've posed my arguments about the subject, which you can view here.

Basically, I'd say that the South is just too warm year-round to the point that the yearly dormancy deciduous trees undergo are just unnecessary in the region. The deciduous trees present in the region are nothing but relics from the last Ice Age, when glaciers extended further south, and replacement with evergreens is slowed down by the North American geography (cut off from the tropics by desert and ocean). But, in the future, deciduous trees will go extinct in the South, and be replaced with evergreens.

 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:39 PM
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Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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"The South" is far more than just the coastal south. http://www.city-data.com/forum/42520410-post606.html
You really should stop saying 'the south' when you mean only those areas of the south closest to the coasts.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:48 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
"The South" is far more than just the coastal south. http://www.city-data.com/forum/42520410-post606.html
You really should stop saying 'the south' when you mean only those areas of the south closest to the coasts.
Actually, I am arguing that, essentially, the entire South is too warm for the dormancy that deciduous trees go through every year. The cold spells are too brief.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
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if that is true, why are there so many hardwoods in the south.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:55 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
Actually, I am arguing that, essentially, the entire South is too warm for the dormancy that deciduous trees go through every year. The cold spells are too brief.
Why argue that? South covers a lot of territory. Leave a field unattended and the birds will plant it for you. You will end up with a forest of a variety of trees.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 10:04 PM
 
470 posts, read 287,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
if that is true, why are there so many hardwoods in the south.
There deciduous hardwoods in the South are holdovers from the last Ice Age, when the glacial expansion made the region a refugia for many plants, including deciduous trees. This gets combined with a seed-block from the ocean/deserts, which causes the South to be cut off from the tropics, the source of the evergreens seen in the region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Why argue that? South covers a lot of territory. Leave a field unattended and the birds will plant it for you. You will end up with a forest of a variety of trees.
Yes, and nearly the entire South is too warm for deciduous trees.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 10:04 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,565,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
"The South" is far more than just the coastal south. http://www.city-data.com/forum/42520410-post606.html
You really should stop saying 'the south' when you mean only those areas of the south closest to the coasts.

Good post . This shallow banal notion that the south is all about the coasts and not the gorgeousness of the inland south, too much shallow and banal fascination about how many variety of palms ( sabals, lipstick,coconut ,windmill, etc ) and how much citrus and warm water beaches, all about the coastal south.

i posted these pictures tonight of some of the oldest rivers on the planet and the oldest mountains on the planet, the southern appalachians. Why are beach and coastal lovers the only ones who ever talk about the south?

These pics are all of a restaurant/bar/ outdoor movie place you can canoe up to in asheville.. The by water bar

my friends pictures from our trip to by water bar in asheville. you canoe up to the bar.

Why are the probably the oldest mountains in the world and the third or fourth oldest river in the world like the french broad or new river is not as interesting as some damn palm or citrus and some beach?







Last edited by floridanative10; 08-16-2016 at 10:19 PM..
 
Old 08-16-2016, 10:09 PM
 
1,829 posts, read 1,251,381 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
In this thread here, there has been disagreement as to whether or not the South was too warm for deciduous trees to exist. I've posed my arguments about the subject, which you can view here.

Basically, I'd say that the South is just too warm year-round to the point that the yearly dormancy deciduous trees undergo are just unnecessary in the region. The deciduous trees present in the region are nothing but relics from the last Ice Age, when glaciers extended further south, and replacement with evergreens is slowed down by the North American geography (cut off from the tropics by desert and ocean). But, in the future, deciduous trees will go extinct in the South, and be replaced with evergreens.
I am no where near an expert on trees, so sorry for the stupid questions. Do evergreens have some sort of reproductive advantage over deciduous trees? I'm asking because, if not, I don't understand why we should expect them to die out and be replaced even if it is too warm for them to regularly shed their leaves.

Also, another stupid question, but don't the mountains in the South, at least, get cold enough for dormancy?
 
Old 08-16-2016, 10:10 PM
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Location: Ohio
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This thread has a ridiculous premise. Either that or those leaves that fall in my yard every February from deciduous trees, like oak, hackberry and persimmon, are just an illusion and I don't need to get out the leaf blower to gather them.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIRAL View Post
There deciduous hardwoods in the South are holdovers from the last Ice Age, when the glacial expansion made the region a refugia for many plants, including deciduous trees. This gets combined with a seed-block from the ocean/deserts, which causes the South to be cut off from the tropics, the source of the evergreens seen in the region.



Yes, and nearly the entire South is too warm for deciduous trees.
if the tree species have been hanging in since the last Ice age, i feel good asserting that the south is not too warm for them.

the seed is strong.
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