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Old 08-17-2016, 08:27 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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I made a thread a few days back about the greenest cities. It would also be interesting to know what the driest cities are. I know Phoenix, ABQ, and Tucson would be there but what other cities are there?
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Old 08-17-2016, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Obviously any Western city that isn't near the coast. Denver, Salt Lake City, Boise, Bozeman, Billings, Spokane, Vegas, Sacramento, Bend, etc.

The West Coast cities, even in California, can and do get muggy on occasions. I remember San Diego being relatively muggy in the summer. But that's what water and oceans do you know... Make humidity.
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Old 08-17-2016, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Driest city in WA is Sunnyside at 6.8 inches and 58 precipitation days
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunnys...ington#Climate

Downtown: https://www.google.com/maps/@46.3238...7i13312!8i6656
Residential area:https://www.google.com/maps/@46.3183...7i13312!8i6656
Outskirts: https://www.google.com/maps/@46.4072...7i13312!8i6656

it's obviously not the driest in the country, but it's probably the direst for the northern half of the country.
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Old 08-18-2016, 09:22 AM
 
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El Centro in California is a very dry place. It receives less than 3 inches per year.
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Old 08-18-2016, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Placitas, New Mexico
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Of the large Southwestern cities, I believe Las Vegas, Phoenix, Albuquerque, El Paso, and Tucson are the driest. Of the smaller cities, Yuma may be about the driest in the country.
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Old 08-18-2016, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Texas
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I would say Las Vegas is the driest of them all.

The precipitation annually in Las Vegas averages 4". Unlike other cities in the region it has very little monsoon in the summer.

I was looking into it and Las Vegas has years where it has less 1" of precipitation the entire year.

Phoenix averages 7" officially, but many of it's suburbs are a bit wetter. Cave Creek and Fountain Hills which is a northern suburb of Phoenix gets about 11" of precipitation annually.

Phoenix can actually be relatively wet during a good monsoon there. Phoenix has gotten 15" of rain over the course of the year before. Flash foods are very common in the summer and winter rainfall is also very common.

Tucson gets about 11" of rain a year. It does have a suburb called Oracle that gets about 19" of rain a year.

In 1983, Tucson had 21" of rain during the year.

Tucson gets a very strong Monsoon in the summer with very common flash flooding. I was just in Tucson it rained several times heavily each day I was there. The washes were flooded out most of the time also. Nearly the entire week I was there they had major flooding in one area or another of the metropolitan area.

Southern Arizona also has actual tropical storms when they cross the state line.

The driest cities are:
Yuma, Arizona 2"- driest city in America I could find
Las Vegas 4"- sometimes it rains in the winter, but the monsoon is very small compared to Phoenix
Bakersfield 6"- very dry summers
Reno 7"- It is the rain shadow of mountains
Phoenix 7"- Official number, but some of the northern suburbs average more then 10"
Yakima, Washington 8"-
Grand Junction, Colorado 8"- very dry city with dry looking mountains, no monsoon
El Paso, Texas 8"- They do have a monsoon
Albuquerque, New Mexico-8"- Officially, but I would venture to guess the foothills are much wetter because of the summer monsoonal moisture

Source:http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/climatedata/...s/citycompppt/

Last edited by lovecrowds; 08-18-2016 at 01:23 PM..
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Old 08-18-2016, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Great post. I was thinking San Diego was a sleeper here. Just looked. 10 inches per year, drier than Tucson.
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Old 08-18-2016, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
I would say Las Vegas is the driest of them all.

The precipitation annually in Las Vegas averages 4". Unlike other cities in the region it has very little monsoon in the summer.

I was looking into it and Las Vegas has years where it has less 1" of precipitation the entire year.

Phoenix averages 7" officially, but many of it's suburbs are a bit wetter. Cave Creek and Fountain Hills which is a northern suburb of Phoenix gets about 11" of precipitation annually.

Phoenix can actually be relatively wet during a good monsoon there. Phoenix has gotten 15" of rain over the course of the year before. Flash foods are very common in the summer and winter rainfall is also very common.

Tucson gets about 11" of rain a year. It does have a suburb called Oracle that gets about 19" of rain a year.

In 1983, Tucson had 21" of rain during the year.

Tucson gets a very strong Monsoon in the summer with very common flash flooding. I was just in Tucson it rained several times heavily each day I was there. The washes were flooded out most of the time also. Nearly the entire week I was there they had major flooding in one area or another of the metropolitan area.

Southern Arizona also has actual tropical storms when they cross the state line.

The driest cities are:
Yuma, Arizona 2"- driest city in America I could find
Las Vegas 4"- sometimes it rains in the winter, but the monsoon is very small compared to Phoenix
Bakersfield 6"- very dry summers
Reno 7"- It is the rain shadow of mountains
Phoenix 7"- Official number, but some of the northern suburbs average more then 10"
Yakima, Washington 8"-
Grand Junction, Colorado 8"- very dry city with dry looking mountains, no monsoon
El Paso, Texas 8"- They do have a monsoon
Albuquerque, New Mexico-8"- Officially, but I would venture to guess the foothills are much wetter because of the summer monsoonal moisture

Source:Precipitation Summary | Western Regional Climate Center
Las Vegas is the driest city that is worth anyone's time.

Tucson does not get that much more rain a year than Phoenix does. While Tucson does rain more yes, they are pretty close together. I'd say an inch or two apart at most. This in part due to elevation which means cooler weather, which encourages the rain clouds a little bit more. Remember if it's above 8 inches (not exactly 8, but at least 8.1" of rain) it's no longer considered a desert but a transition/ "semi-arid" area. Most of the West falls in the semi-arid classification, such as Denver, Boise, and I believe SLC (SLC gets a ton of snowfall though which I'm not counting). ABQ at 8" means it just barely qualifies as a desert. Phoenix and Tucson, both of which sit in the lushest desert in the whole world, also barely qualifies as desert climates but they do.

California cities that sit in the rain shadows of very large mountains (think Palm Springs, Indio, etc.) are arguably the more "true" deserts in the nation because they see arguably next to no rainfall at all because of rain shadows. It is because of these rain shadows is why Death Valley is the way it is, and what influences Las Vegas to have next to no rain at all. The Mojave desert is the most dry desert in our country, and I believe Bullhead City also sits in it and gets extra hot and a lot less rain than a lot of Arizona. Yuma I believe straddles the two deserts.
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