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Old 08-23-2016, 03:00 PM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
People surviving on minimum wage in Florida are always either living with family or living multiple people crammed into a tiny space. Rents are going up like crazy and I truly believe Florida is on the brink of a homeless catastrophe because the only building going on is luxury that the working classes could never afford.
Quote:
Originally Posted by goolsbyjazz View Post
I keep hearing this about Florida, south Florida in particular. I am quite fond of Miami/Fort Lauderdale and was starting to ponder that area, but I hear so many comments like this that it has me rethinking.
Miami-Ft Lauderdale is better off than Orlando thanks to a more balanced economy. Orlando is booming largely on the backs of service-sector jobs and temporary local-state-federal funded construction projects. The median income in the Orlando metro area is just $35,000, the average rent is around $1000 and has had the second largest increase in rental rates in the country over the past couple of years with no sign of a slowdown. With a huge chunk of the population unable to afford saving for a downpayment for buying a house (let alone qualifying for one), the rental market can/will control rental costs as there isn't any other option. In other words the growth seen in Orlando isn't sustainable and is going to lead to some dire consequences like elevated crime and homelessness if not corrected via higher paying jobs, which isn't evident in appearing anytime soon.
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Old 08-23-2016, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,510,531 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Miami-Ft Lauderdale is better off than Orlando thanks to a more balanced economy. Orlando is booming largely on the backs of service-sector jobs and temporary local-state-federal funded construction projects. The median income in the Orlando metro area is just $35,000, the average rent is around $1000 and has had the second largest increase in rental rates in the country over the past couple of years with no sign of a slowdown. With a huge chunk of the population unable to afford saving for a downpayment for buying a house (let alone qualifying for one), the rental market can/will control rental costs as there isn't any other option. In other words the growth seen in Orlando isn't sustainable and is going to lead to some dire consequences like elevated crime and homelessness if not corrected via higher paying jobs, which isn't evident in appearing anytime soon.
The people are currently at the mercy of their rents. Wages stagnate, rent goes up, nothing the working person can do. They need a toilet and a roof over their head. I agree, an impending crisis is imminent. I watched the same thing happen out in Denver and the consensus was people said to "move back to where you came from". That comment might not indicate catastrophe for a medium sized city with a niche social scene like Denver. A state with over 20 million people is facing that same thing, with locals and home grown Floridians suffering the most. Telling millions of people to "go back to where you came from" when most of them were born in the state isn't going to go over well.
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Old 08-25-2016, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,785 posts, read 6,515,952 times
Reputation: 1539
Wow after reading all of the comments, I must say that I'm happy to live in Alabama. My wife and I make over the state's median income of 43k and we're able to pay rent comfortably and eat out a couple times a week. An apartment in a decent area here in Mobile,Al would be around $750+.
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Old 08-25-2016, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,510,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
Wow after reading all of the comments, I must say that I'm happy to live in Alabama. My wife and I make over the state's median income of 43k and we're able to pay rent comfortably and eat out a couple times a week. An apartment in a decent area here in Mobile,Al would be around $750+.
Can I ask a question. You say rent in a decent part of the city is $750.00. What do you think it would be in a not-so decent part of town?
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Old 08-25-2016, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,785 posts, read 6,515,952 times
Reputation: 1539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Can I ask a question. You say rent in a decent part of the city is $750.00. What do you think it would be in a not-so decent part of town?
Well let me be a little more specific because size and type play a role as well.

An 800 sqft 1 bedroom in a decent area would start around $750 and in a non decent area it could range between 400-500. A studio in an older complex in a decent neighborhood could cost around 550 and a studio in a newer complex in the same neighborhood could cost around 600.

Last edited by PortCity; 08-25-2016 at 03:57 AM..
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Old 08-25-2016, 04:18 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,510,531 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
Well let me be a little more specific because size and type play a role as well.

An 800 sqft 1 bedroom in a decent area would start around $750 and in a non decent area it could range between 400-500. A studio in an older complex in a decent neighborhood could cost around 550 and a studio in a newer complex in the same neighborhood could cost around 600.
Thanks, I was curious. I have a thread started in the Great Debates forum talking about rental markets across the country and in the data sets I posted Mobile wasn't in them (or my eyes missed it).
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