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Old 08-20-2016, 11:00 AM
 
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There are some surprising results here, especially with Florida being among those with the highest number of hours worked on average, and as a state that is seeing job and population growth primarily via minimum wage jobs along with lower skilled/less educated workers.

Here's How Many Hours You Need to Work to Pay Rent in Every State
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Old 08-20-2016, 11:24 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Baltimore is trying to get the minimum wage raised to $15/hr. You damn have to have a college degree to make that in most places.
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Old 08-20-2016, 11:47 AM
 
12,843 posts, read 4,646,651 times
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Baltimore is trying to get the minimum wage raised to $15/hr. You damn have to have a college degree to make that in most places.
Which goes to show how poorly paid college educated people are. $15 is the bare minimum in a city like Baltimore.

The best states for minimum wage workers would be someplace with a strong social safety net. So not the South.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:15 PM
 
92 posts, read 58,679 times
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Is that really true ?

''There isn’t any state in the country where a minimum wage worker can afford rent for a one-bedroom apartment working 40 hours a week.''

I saw on the comments, someone said that:

''The only thing about this is; the data encompasses the entire state and uses the most expensive place to live. In the town I grew up in, in California, you can get a 2 bedroom house for $625 a month. Minimum wage there is $10 an hour. if you worked 40 hours a week you'd make $1600 a month, which is more than enough to pay $625 in rent. Even here, in Washington state, in the town I live in the average rent for a 1 bedroom is about 700 a month, minimum wage is about $1500 a month, which covers rent with no problem. I really wish this misinformation would stop making its way around the internet, all it's doing is freaking people out. No one says you have to live in Seattle, or New York City to make a living.''

Can't we live in US (not in CA, NY I am talking about cheapest cities like Ohio, Iowa..) with min. wage + 40 hours per week ? Single person and studio flat.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:46 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,798 posts, read 54,455,776 times
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It's actually not a reasonable way to show the data. Few states have the same minimum wage and same cost of living in every city. Here in our state, for example, the minimum wage is $9.47, but in Seattle and a couple of other cities, it's $15 or in between on the way to $15 over the next couple of years. For a one bedroom apartment here in our city, it's $2,300, in Seattle, the average is over $1,400, in nearby Kent, about $1,000, in Pasco, WA $850, Yakima $500.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,868,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whocares386 View Post
Is that really true ?

''There isnít any state in the country where a minimum wage worker can afford rent for a one-bedroom apartment working 40 hours a week.''

I saw on the comments, someone said that:

''The only thing about this is; the data encompasses the entire state and uses the most expensive place to live. In the town I grew up in, in California, you can get a 2 bedroom house for $625 a month. Minimum wage there is $10 an hour. if you worked 40 hours a week you'd make $1600 a month, which is more than enough to pay $625 in rent. Even here, in Washington state, in the town I live in the average rent for a 1 bedroom is about 700 a month, minimum wage is about $1500 a month, which covers rent with no problem. I really wish this misinformation would stop making its way around the internet, all it's doing is freaking people out. No one says you have to live in Seattle, or New York City to make a living.''

Can't we live in US (not in CA, NY I am talking about cheapest cities like Ohio, Iowa..) with min. wage + 40 hours per week ? Single person and studio flat.
Two problems, 1. 99% of minimum wage jobs are under 32hrs/week (in order to avoid benefits and paid days off), and 2. You can't qualify for $625/month making $1,600/month due to rent to income requirements, especially for a house. At 3x (income 3 times the rent), you would have to make $1,875/month to be allowed to rent a $625/month house/apt
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Old 08-20-2016, 05:14 PM
 
8,807 posts, read 4,721,853 times
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Connecticut
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Old 08-20-2016, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
3,255 posts, read 1,633,586 times
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Colorado would be one of the worst for sure but yet people still swarm into this state.

One who moves without a family or social network with a minimum wage job will end up on the streets in no time.

The rent is very high in metro Denver where the population lives, apartments tend to be very selective on criteria. The typical apartment here also an added fee for water, sewer and common area plus the electric is high because it has more freezing mornings then any metropolitan area in America and also hotter then typical summer high temperatures.

They do have weekly apartments for rent that people could rent without a high wage but they are expensive.

For example, the same $159 weeklies in Metro Phoenix, Las Vegas or Atlanta will be $359 here and those are reserved in advance.

The cost of transit is very high. For example, the light-rail has zone fares so a short trip can be $4.

The state spends very little on social programs and the one's they do have are a dog and pony show.

For example, the new affordable housing units in Denver tend to be expensive, luxury units for national attention. Not single-room occupancies that could house far more people for the same amount.

The more affordable parts of the state have extremely bad job prospects. There is a huge gap in job markets.

I would not recommend Utah for minimum wage workers either. However, I can't think of a better state for the middle-class.

Utah has a very low poverty rate compared to other states so never has been much political support for expanding social programs. The social programs tend to referrals to church-based non-profits.

Other then a neighborhood or two in Salt Lake City and Ogden, it seems like the land of milk and honey.

With such a massive middle-class in Utah that has jobs mainly with big employers that offer benefits there seems to be a denial that there is poverty in Utah.

There also is a belief in Utah that people should go to educational institutions and connect with people through religious institutions.

There is a huge emphasis in Utah on social networking. Hence, why so many networking based companies and multi-tier marketing companies originated in the state.

Metro Salt Lake City tends to have relatively high rents for apartments also. After utilities are added on from the climate it is a relatively expensive city for renters.

Despite, all this the state has lowest income disparity and a massive middle-class. Huge homes can be had a rock-bottom price in many of its suburbs close to major job centers such as Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain.

Utah. Terrible state for a minimum wage job or to be poor, no better state in my opinion for the middle-class
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Old 08-20-2016, 10:29 PM
 
1,614 posts, read 1,061,903 times
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Connecticut should be #1
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Old 08-21-2016, 05:16 AM
 
231 posts, read 154,878 times
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I would say any state that doesn't have medicaid for single people would qualify. So, basically, all of the southern states, and some scattered around the rest of the country.

The cost of health care in this country is a huge burden for those who cannot afford insurance out of pocket (and whose jobs/work hours don't cover it)
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