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Old 08-22-2016, 06:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I would have said Detroit.
I don't know how this discussion can be had without mentioning Detroit.
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Old 08-22-2016, 06:28 AM
 
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SW/West burbs of Minneapolis. Major employment center (Bloomington, Edina, EP, Minnetonka, SLP), 3 upscale malls, every retailer inanigable. Many people live, work, shop in these areas and go in to Minneapolis only for entertainment.

Chicago - 2 main areas. North burbs centered around Glenbrook, Northbrook and Deerfield. Again, lots of employment, retail and lifestyle shopping. The other area is west burbs (Oak Brook, Naperville, Wheaton etc).

When I moved to Eden Prairie MN I remember reading about 'edge cities'

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edge_city
"term for a concentration of business, shopping, and entertainment outside a traditional downtown (or central business district) in what had previously been a residential or rural area."
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Old 08-22-2016, 06:57 AM
 
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None. None of them. These burbs exist solely because of the anchor cities' infrastructure and resources.
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:08 AM
 
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People in this thread are just listing suburbs with "downtowns" or those that are large commercial centers. Neither of which are anything special, and suburbs still rely on the core city.
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Not sure when you left Phoenix, but the city proper has made a resurgence since light rail came in
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
None. None of them. These burbs exist solely because of the anchor cities' infrastructure and resources.
Not necessary, places like Andover, MA, Tewksbury, MA, Hingham, MA etc have only about Tripled/quadrupled since 1900, which is roughly in line with US growth.
Newburyport, Plymouth, Lowell, Lawrence, Brockton, Haverhill, Lynn, Salem, Gloucester, Weymouth, Etc really haven't changed all that much since about 1900, And all are pretty independent of Boston.
Heck there are people from Gloucester who brag about how they have never been over the bridge onto the mainland.
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewjdeg View Post
People in this thread are just listing suburbs with "downtowns" or those that are large commercial centers. Neither of which are anything special, and suburbs still rely on the core city.
Read the edge city wiki link I provided. It's kind of fascinating IMO. Some of these super suburbs have as many corporate jobs as their downtown counterparts.
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Not necessary, places like Andover, MA, Tewksbury, MA, Hingham, MA etc have only about Tripled/quadrupled since 1900, which is roughly in line with US growth.
Newburyport, Plymouth, Lowell, Lawrence, Brockton, Haverhill, Lynn, Salem, Gloucester, Weymouth, Etc really haven't changed all that much since about 1900, And all are pretty independent of Boston.
Heck there are people from Gloucester who brag about how they have never been over the bridge onto the mainland.
No one is arguing that all suburbs occupy the same tear, but rather that they exist because of the poor city. Those suburban office parks exist because the big city with its airports, rail, highways, and population make them possible.
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Old 08-22-2016, 07:49 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
None. None of them. These burbs exist solely because of the anchor cities' infrastructure and resources.
Not true regarding cities like Boston, New York City and Philadelphia where many of the suburbs have independent functioning governments since the colonial era. Cities like Patterson, Newark, Camden etc. were already growing before they became suburbs. And there are many communities around Boston and New York City that were either working seaports or resort areas.

I would say the same thing with a later date for cities like Chicago, Richmond and Atlanta. There are probably many more.
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Not true regarding cities like Boston, New York City and Philadelphia where many of the suburbs have independent functioning governments since the colonial era. Cities like Patterson, Newark, Camden etc. were already growing before they became suburbs. And there are many communities around Boston and New York City that were either working seaports or resort areas.

I would say the same thing with a later date for cities like Chicago, Richmond and Atlanta. There are probably many more.
Patterson, Newark , and Camden are not suburbs. They're satellite cities.
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Old 08-22-2016, 12:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
No one is arguing that all suburbs occupy the same tear, but rather that they exist because of the poor city. Those suburban office parks exist because the big city with its airports, rail, highways, and population make them possible.
If you believe Lowell, Lawrence, or Salem Massachusetts (or even Waltham) exists because of Boston then you need a history lesson
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