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Old 08-22-2016, 02:33 PM
 
218 posts, read 161,683 times
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I have lived in several major cities and if I knew then, what I know now, I wouldn't have made so many changes, but it was a great learning experience. Here is a rundown of the cities I've experienced first hand after college:

1.) Washington, DC. I started out by working for Georgetown University. I didn't make much. I was a Patient Care Coordinator at the hospital. I was living with my cousin and then I got my own place but it was in a bad part of town in Arlington and I had very little left over to live on let alone furnish my apartment. Foolish decision on my part to get my own place on my salary. I had maybe a bed and a table and that was about it. I got homesick after four or five months and went back home. It was not an easy place to make friends when you can barely afford to eat, but they had a great nightlife. I remember going out a lot with my cousin and meeting lots of military guys. The Dome was quite popular back then.

2.) Boston, MA: Of all the places I have ever lived, I found the people in Boston to be the coldest. Some had Boston charm, just not many. The job market back in '91 was bad. I was temping right next to Ivy League kids. It was bizarre! I had a roommate in Somerville while I was temping. After six months of temping I realized Boston wasn't for me. It's even more difficult when you discover your roommate is a snob and you don't realize this until AFTER you've moved in. She threw a hissy fit when I told her that I was moving out. Boston can be great if you have lots of money and you're established with the right circles, but you could say that about anywhere you go.

3.) Hartford, CT: From Boston I went on to live with a brother near UConn and I got job in Hartford working for a law firm. It was not a good fit. I dealt with some real psycho lawyers as a floater, but to be fair some were very nice. I had made a few friends where I worked and I got my own apartment in Hartford. I felt that Connecticut was a very quiet bedroom community for the most part. Not big on nightlife or had many options for singles. People were pretty established and set in their ways in this area so I decided to move back to Washington, DC, while I was still in my 20s, because there were lots of jobs there and I kind of missed it.

4.) Washington, DC: Back in '94 DC was booming and there were amazing temp options! There were so many jobs!! You could pick and choose what you wanted from the agencies. I worked for some great places. Some of them were very corporate and very snooty though. I had a good social life with friends and plenty of dating options, but I got tired of the pace, the insane Beltway traffic that drains you, and the same old same old after six years so I moved to NYC for something entirely different. I wish I NEVER made that mistake!!

5.) New York City: I was there for almost six years. I didn't like the gloomy grey weather and the many rainy days or the high cost of living. The subway system was always having delays and problems in the hot and sticky summer months. I didn't think NYC was a beautiful clean city. I thought it was a dirty grungy city. I would never want to move back there even though the pay for working as a legal secretary was AMAZING!! Dating is by FAR the toughest in NYC out of all the places I have ever lived next to South Florida. I had a NICE group of friends that I'm still in touch with today though. It's a hard city and I think it's EVEN harder once you get older in that city. It's great when you're young and impressionable but after a while, you REALIZE that NYC is not the end all be all of all places. It's mostly hype! There are so many other places to choose from!

6.) San Diego - I was here for a year. This is quite an adjustment coming from NYC. It was like Mayberry. It had a nice small town feel if you like that sort of thing. I was in awe of the deep blue skies when I first arrived! That's for sure! My friend told me in advance that you didn't need a car. You definitely do! I ended up settling in La Mesa and buying a car. I worked for a law firm in downtown. My boss died three months into the position and my other boss couldn't stand San Diego and wanted to move to San Francisco. It was very sad and difficult under those circumstances. She gave me a hard time but I heard that she complained about everything and everyone so not to take it personally. It was a nice firm but they wanted me to learn litigation and I just didn't have it in me to do litigation. It's not for everybody. Litigation is complex and tedious. I really loved San Diego at first. I met a great guy too. In the end, everything fell apart and since the job market was soooo bad in '07 that I decided to venture up north to Irvine.

7.) Irvine - This town is really pretty, really clean and really expensive. I had a great job with big bucks, BUT it was with a major type A boss and that lasted for about eight months but the girl who replaced me, mind you she was a paralegal lasted for about two weeks because she felt it was okay for her to split early and they didn't like that very much at all and told her to leave. This town is loaded with noncommittal older men. They just wanted to party party party. Settling down just wasn't what they wanted and the local girls complained that all the guys here were noncommittal. Making friends was fairly easy here. Lots of hiking clubs and gaming groups. Lots of nice people in the area. I did notice that there were lots of white guys with Asian girls here. After living in Irvine for close to two years I decided to come back to the East Coast to South Florida. At that time I was enrolled in a medical transcription program online.

8.) South Florida - I decided on here because my parents lived here and I missed them. The weather and the tropical environment are beautiful! As far as dating, the guys down here are few and far between especially the farther you move out of the Palm Beach area. If you like to mix and mingle with the 60 plus crowd, it'll be pure heaven! One of my friends had two single girlfriends in their 30s and the other in her 50s, who lived in this area and they left because they thought dating was the pits here even though they had good jobs. One left for Seattle and loves it and the other went to Charlotte, NC and can't stand it. She said that Charlotte was snooty and she felt isolated there. It's not easy to make friends in South Florida that's for sure and there are many people who agree with that assessment. The wages are the LOWEST in the nation so be prepared to not make very much money at all or hold down two jobs. BUT if you have a job in the medical field, you should do just fine!

After reading through this list that I'm sharing with you, I realize I suffered from WANDERLUST and THE GRASS IS GREENER SOMEWHERE ELSE SYNDROME and picking jobs that weren't really suited for me and my strengths. That's like hitting your head against the wall because it's all you know how to do! I need to work on finding something I love to do. I want to stay away from high stress office jobs if I can help it! I have a college degree in Political Science but so many people these days has a degree in something or other and still can't find work! I need more specialized skills. I fell into the ADMIN pool directly out of college for most of my life and never got out of it, except for my brief foray into medical transcription. The End.

Last edited by MissMouse111; 08-22-2016 at 02:43 PM..
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Old 08-22-2016, 03:04 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 3,229,070 times
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1. Boston, MA - Grew up in suburbs, went to school at Umass-Amherst and lived in Waltham and Cambridge in my 20's before leaving the state when I was 28. Cold winters, hot and humid summers, rude people, obsessive sports fandom. Tons of American history, great access to culture/museums, some very good food, Cape Cod, relatively easy access to nice rural, forrest areas in western MA, NH, VT, ME.

2. SF Bay Area - Lived in Alameda/Oakland area and worked in SF for about a year back in 1999. I had a great time as 22 year old. Worked 50-60 hours a week but I was playing video games for a living and making enough to support myself and actually live alone (which would probably be unthinkable these days with Bay Area housing costs). I love SF. You do have your fair share of crime, homeless and hippie street kids but like Boston, I feel like positives outweigh negatives.

3. Washington DC/NOVA - Lived in Fairfax, VA for a year and worked in Tyson's Corner and DC for govt contractor. Being in and around all of the homes of U.S. democracy is amazing regardless of how you feel about present day government. Smithsonian is an incredible resource to have at your fingertips. Everyone where I lived in VA seemed like super yuppies and had at least a Master's degree and dressed head to toe in expensive outdoors/active wear straight from REI. Nice quality of life and great place to be outdoors except for about 2 months per year when it's 90 degrees and 100 % humidity. Only place I've lived or been with traffic as bad as LA (well I've been to Moscow and Bangkok which were pretty bad too)

4. Los Angeles - Where I've spent the past 10 years. Weather is great almost year round. It is 90-100 for much of the summer where I live now and we've been right up against some of these huge wild fires but you can basically be outside 365 days per year and never have to check a weather report when you have something planned. Access to ocean, mountains, forrest and desert within short drives. San Diego, Palm Springs and Vegas are easy road trips as well as Big Bear, the Sierras, Santa Barbara and even SF (or easier flight). The best food and variety of ethnic foods of anywhere I have ever lived. Access to anything you want entertainment wise. Traffic sucks, housing prices and rent are catching up to SF and NYC quickly but salaries are not, state and local government takes way too much of your money and misuses it on things that most citizens don't care about, homeless problem is getting way out of hand, crime is better then it was but still a concern...and did I mention the traffic?
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Old 08-22-2016, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,733 times
Reputation: 2893
1) Colorado Springs: I was born in Colorado Springs and partly raised here. The city first and foremost has a terrible economy for a city of it's size. The weather is beautiful in the summer and but the weather is very cold and windy for much of the year.
The scenery and parks are amazing, The only thing I like about this place other then being around relatives is the beautiful mountain parks.

If there was ever a reality show about families deep in debt I would think Colorado Springs would be a perfect city for it. The metropolitan area has a per-capita income about 10 percent but yet many residents feel the need in the last decade to Keep up with the Jones.

I miss it when it was half the size it was. It was mainly military and retirees back then. I guess 300,000 new residents since the 1990s will change a place.

I used to like Colorado Springs, but over the years it has became an overwhelmed city with too much population growth and very little employment growth. I remember it being a city of nice retirees and now it is just a city of many young families who are trying to live in an executive lifestyle on mainly modest budgets, its a lower-middle class city at best. The city has an extremely high suicide and drug overdose death rate. People to seem to have a much higher rate of cold's and flu's then other cities I have lived in.

I like population growth, but it would be much nicer if it were a smaller metropolitan area as the area handles population growth worse then any metropolitan area I lived in.

2) Denver: I grew up partly in Denver. In my opinion it's a very overpriced, decent city. It is rather clean, orderly and has less social problems then most big cities.

The city itself is extremely polite, but not friendly. The population tends to be very aloof with many doing all they can to live an upscale lifestyle. The winter weather is extremely cold in the morning and the summer afternoons are blazing hot usually.

3) Salt Lake City: A very flashy city with a huge emphasis on health. It was the only city where ever felt jealous do the amount of extremely attractive people. Most people are very smart but very superficial but I find them very interesting when I talk to them.

Salt Lake City despite much of the city feeling like a resort town has some awful areas. The amount of disorder, homelessness, open-air drug and alcohol use is pretty incredible for a city of it's size.

4) Orem, Utah: Utah County in general feels like a very-bland, egalitarian place. Lots of very friendly people who are interesting to talk to though. The whole area has really nice topography. Utah is supposedly the highest level of equality of any state in America and Orem sure feels like it.

5) Las Vegas, Nevada: I won't be moving back. It is an extremely disorderly, overwhelmed city. I wouldn't call it rude, but it is not a place to extend a healthy social network. The economy really is weak outside of the leisure and hospitality field.

Another thing about Las Vegas it is so dry it feels like Mars. The humidity was so that I was constantly drinking water. The winter mornings are cold with all the wind. The summer always felt just as hot as Phoenix due to the higher elevation and lack of afternoon cloudiness.

6) Phoenix: It certainly has alot of big city issues. The city itself in my opinion has all the problems of a big city with few of the benefits. That said it has some of the best suburbs in the country. Gilbert, Scottsdale, Tempe, Chandler are extremely impressive suburbs. It has some of the friendliest and least friendly I have ever met. The city has a very wide variety of people also.

I lived in the area for a couple of years and rarely felt the need to go into the city. Very few people I worked with went to the city itself unless there was a sports event.

Phoenix also gets alot more flooding then I thought it did. Between the monsoon and left-over tropical moisture it gets some fairly impressive rainfall.

7) Omaha: The people are the friendliest and most genuine people I ever met. It almost brings to my eyes thinking about how many great people live in that city. The people there are extremely down to earth and interesting.

A vast majority of Omaha is very nice, but there are some neighborhoods in my opinion that are some of the roughest in the country. I have never lived in a city that had so much crime in a couple of neighborhoods and the rest is basically nearly as safe as a small town.

I loved the summer lushness and architecture in Omaha as it is a very old, hilly city. The winter is very, very cold with fog coming off the river commonly.

8) Louisville: I lived in Louisville a very short-time. I loved how lush and green the city was. The city seems to be way short of what it could be though. It has all the architecture, location and infrastructure it needs to be a great city but in my opinion it was underwhelming. I also thought the summer weather was better then I thought it be as the whole time I was there it rarely got up to 90 degrees.

I also thought the city was very unfriendly. I came across more rude and angry people then in most cities I have been in

9) Des Moines: The city feels huge for the city and metropolitan area population. The city overall is very close-knit, cliquish and polite. Most people who live there are from there and there is a huge sense of community that other cities lack.

It also feels very well off compared to other similar-sized cities. People there seem to be extremely content and laid-back. It seems to be planned-very well also.

I was stunned by how a core of a city and metropolitan area of it's size could feel so big. I have been in large metropolitan areas that did not have anything close to the downtown that Des Moines had

Overall, it is very lush with lots of really nice architecture. The downtown was so clean, it felt so polished and there was very little litter.

Last edited by lovecrowds; 08-22-2016 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 08-22-2016, 05:59 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
449 posts, read 707,359 times
Reputation: 557
MissMouse111, you made me chuckle because I have had so many jobs and have temped for the last 14 years I have lived in North Carolina, with the exception of a few full-time jobs that weren't good fits. I'm guessing I'm a lot older than you are, but I, too, have suffered from Wanderlust and the Grass is Greener Somewhere Else too.

1) Miami. Grew up there, but many years ago, and never having to pay rent, living at home. Loved it there. Studied journalism at the Univ. of Miami, worked for a business journal, then in human resources in the hotel industry. I moved from there to DeLand, FL where my parents retired. I returned to Miami 6 years later and it had changed and when I visited last it was not the same Miami I knew. Now it's not affordable to live there. Everybody drives a BMW or some similar expensive car. The traffic, commute times are horrible. People are very into status, looking better than the next person, having more than the next person.

2) Cleveland. Lived there two different times. Went there at a bad time of life when my parents had passed away, so that, with the winter gloom and the snow were too much at the time, going there straight from Miami. But, I miss it! I loved all the ethnic diversity, the beautiful parks, walking along Lake Erie each season, lower rents/cost of living, University Circle (museums, including the Cleveland Museum of Art, Severance Hall, etc.). I temped there the whole time, doing office work but around really nice people for the most part, genuine people who didn't put on airs. I would like to go back there.

3) Charlotte. Did a stint of retail there. It's the only place that comes close to being a real city in North Carolina. There are a lot of beautiful residential areas there, very posh neighborhoods, also very snobby people. I didn't find it a welcoming city. Maybe for me it was not belonging because of being a middle-aged single woman. There are a lot of families there and young couples, and young executive types - my impression, at least. It's a pretty city though. It doesn't have run-down old buildings because of being a newer city.

4) Raleigh-Durham. This is where I am now. I've done many years of temping here for staffing agencies and I feel like it's been very damaging for me in that I'm pigeonholed as office/clerical, which isn't who I really am. I have been teaching English as a Second Language to adults all these years part-time (14 years). I've enjoyed meeting students from different countries and learning about their cultures. However, I have felt very alone here for 14 years, not feeling like I belong here. I feel like it's the culture. I've tried so many different things here - social groups, jobs - something is missing. I don't feel like I've ever really been liked by the local southerners. Have not dated. I don't care for southern men and they don't care for me. Durham does have a bit of character but Raleigh has no charm/character at all. To me it's government city, just like Tallahassee or Columbus, Ohio.

I am looking for another waterfront city. I feel like part of my own problems have been not having carved out a niche for myself outside of the ESL teaching. I am about to start doing companion care for a healthcare agency, feeling like that might be a good fit. If it is, I will move on from here in the future, but not sure where yet.
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Norfolk (ODU)
88 posts, read 89,067 times
Reputation: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamian in nc View Post
MissMouse111, you made me chuckle because I have had so many jobs and have temped for the last 14 years I have lived in North Carolina, with the exception of a few full-time jobs that weren't good fits. I'm guessing I'm a lot older than you are, but I, too, have suffered from Wanderlust and the Grass is Greener Somewhere Else too.

1) Miami. Grew up there, but many years ago, and never having to pay rent, living at home. Loved it there. Studied journalism at the Univ. of Miami, worked for a business journal, then in human resources in the hotel industry. I moved from there to DeLand, FL where my parents retired. I returned to Miami 6 years later and it had changed and when I visited last it was not the same Miami I knew. Now it's not affordable to live there. Everybody drives a BMW or some similar expensive car. The traffic, commute times are horrible. People are very into status, looking better than the next person, having more than the next person.

2) Cleveland. Lived there two different times. Went there at a bad time of life when my parents had passed away, so that, with the winter gloom and the snow were too much at the time, going there straight from Miami. But, I miss it! I loved all the ethnic diversity, the beautiful parks, walking along Lake Erie each season, lower rents/cost of living, University Circle (museums, including the Cleveland Museum of Art, Severance Hall, etc.). I temped there the whole time, doing office work but around really nice people for the most part, genuine people who didn't put on airs. I would like to go back there.

3) Charlotte. Did a stint of retail there. It's the only place that comes close to being a real city in North Carolina. There are a lot of beautiful residential areas there, very posh neighborhoods, also very snobby people. I didn't find it a welcoming city. Maybe for me it was not belonging because of being a middle-aged single woman. There are a lot of families there and young couples, and young executive types - my impression, at least. It's a pretty city though. It doesn't have run-down old buildings because of being a newer city.

4) Raleigh-Durham. This is where I am now. I've done many years of temping here for staffing agencies and I feel like it's been very damaging for me in that I'm pigeonholed as office/clerical, which isn't who I really am. I have been teaching English as a Second Language to adults all these years part-time (14 years). I've enjoyed meeting students from different countries and learning about their cultures. However, I have felt very alone here for 14 years, not feeling like I belong here. I feel like it's the culture. I've tried so many different things here - social groups, jobs - something is missing. I don't feel like I've ever really been liked by the local southerners. Have not dated. I don't care for southern men and they don't care for me. Durham does have a bit of character but Raleigh has no charm/character at all. To me it's government city, just like Tallahassee or Columbus, Ohio.

I am looking for another waterfront city. I feel like part of my own problems have been not having carved out a niche for myself outside of the ESL teaching. I am about to start doing companion care for a healthcare agency, feeling like that might be a good fit. If it is, I will move on from here in the future, but not sure where yet.

Check out Norfolk/ Virginia Beach
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
Reputation: 7704
Miami, FL and its sorrounding suburbs: My hometown. I enjoyed my childhood but the older I got the more I hated Miami and wanted out. The climate, scenery, culture, it's not my cup of tea. It's worth visiting at least once if you've never been but its an overrated city. Possibly the worst customer service in the whole nation.

San Angelo, TX: Similar to what I imagined Texas to be like when I was younger. Dry, western, dusty. It's an all right place for what it is. I like its southwestern setting, was very new to me. Only lived there for a month. Some parts were pretty ghetto, though.

Cisco, TX: Small town, not much to do except go to the lake or drink (sometimes two birds with one stone) or go to nearby Eastland and goof off at Wal-Mart. I went to college there for a semestre and the drama was like a 90s high school movie. Was too old to deal with that $h!t. The town itself is.. well its a small west Texas town. It's got that old west architecture, some interesting sites like the Mobley Hotel but not much else about it. It was cool to experience small town life though, and no it really was not a culture shock like so many people thought it'd be.

Abilene, TX: Small city in west Texas. Not as dusty as San Angelo but still with that western plains setting. Very nice people, a somewhat of a small town feel but also surprisingly diverse. Made some good friends here. Lived over a summer, its a place I miss at times. I feel its probably the most quintessential "Texas" city.

Denton, TX: Where I live now. A college town with an exploding population. The roads and construction suck but overall I like the town. I like that despite it being a hardcore college town, its still independent as it is and has a very cool vibe created by its population of college students which bring a lot of life and diversity to what would otherwise be a semi-rural north Texas area just barely in the metroplex. I just hope it doesn't explode and become another Austin, though. It's not as clean or as nice looking as Abilene but I still like it.
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Old 08-22-2016, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,161,493 times
Reputation: 2321
Boston MA: Wellesley to be exact its a uber wealthy town with super education people. It is a very nice place to grow up amazing actually if you can afford it, friendly people a tad bit intellectually elitist many Ivy League graduates live in the town.

Cincinnati OH/Indian Hill: I moved here when I was a teenager because the cost of living was lower than Boston and my parents wanted to buy a bigger home and send me to boarding school and the cost of living was cheaper to live in Cincinnati area than in the Boston area, its another uber wealthy suburb but the people are friendly here just a tab bit snobby as well.

Miami Beach: I have lived in the Miami area on and off my entire life. My family owns a condo here. Great place to live if you are rich but the people are fake and shallow for the most part, people pretend to be richer than they are. Great nightclub scene but I do cannot deal with the people I get VIP.

Nashville TN: Spend many years here in college and after college. I love Nashville its my adopted home, people are pretty damn friendly here and down to earth, only place I ever lived in where people actually make an effort to be nice to you without wanting anything in return, very welcoming and outgoing city but it has its issues with over population and rising costs of living now that people it is a trendy city.
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Old 08-30-2016, 04:14 PM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,663,351 times
Reputation: 1695
I have only lived in one previous place and that is the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex.All I can really remember is some old family friends and Six Flags was fun as a little kid.I moved away from there to another part of the state when I was young.The part of the Metroplex where I lived has gotten run down since I left.
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Old 08-30-2016, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,853 posts, read 2,978,355 times
Reputation: 3399
Great post. Seems like you hated all of your bosses.
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Old 08-30-2016, 08:25 PM
 
97 posts, read 84,538 times
Reputation: 41
Austin TX: Nice city. Cranes everywhere. Skyline is growing. Hot as hell. West side of the city is nice with the hills. Expensive. Traffic is horrible. People are stuck up. Growing tech scene. Nice city to visit but could not live there.

Nashville TN: Similar to Austin. Cranes everywhere. Weather is way better than austin. gets kinda hot in the summer, but not 100+ everyday like Austin. Gets snow, but not for long. the hills that surround nashville are beautiful, better than the hill country. fast growing. Broadway was great. Midtown area is becoming like downtown. Great city could see myself living here.

Charlotte: Again, cranes everywhere. Trying to hard to be like Atlanta, but wont be, not for atleast 50 years lol. Uptown is nice. nice city but nothing interesting about it. city has no history, everything is brand new.

Atlanta: Love it. awesome city. People already know bout atl so i wont talk much bout it but its great.
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