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Old 08-30-2016, 03:55 PM
 
346 posts, read 759,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I was surprised when I first saw the density stats of the Lexington, KY urbanized area...quite a bit higher than those of larger, classically urban places.
What numbers did you read for the Lexington, KY urbanized area? I saw the population density of 953/sq mi for Lexington, which is lower than most urban areas that are extremely suburban in nature.
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Old 08-30-2016, 03:59 PM
 
346 posts, read 759,491 times
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I would say the population density numbers that have shocked me the most are some of the prominent midwest cities: Cleveland, Cincinatti, St. Louis, Detroit, etc. I believe the cities feel more dense/urban than the density numbers reveal. Also, Richmond VA suprises me because the city feels more dense to me than the population density numbers of 3,292.6 people per square mile. New Orleans is another city with suprisingly low population density numbers in my opinion.

Last edited by Kbank007; 08-30-2016 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 08-30-2016, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,114 posts, read 2,530,936 times
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For a city with only middling density numbers, Portland, Oregon feels a little crowded.

Portland has a greater density of adults than some cities with higher overall density.
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Old 08-30-2016, 05:17 PM
 
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Hawthorne, Maywood, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Lawndale, and others are suburbs of Los Angeles in every way, shape, and form, full of SFHs. yet are still some of the most densely populated cities in the entire country.
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Old 08-30-2016, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,926 posts, read 6,920,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Hawthorne, Maywood, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Lawndale, and others are suburbs of Los Angeles in every way, shape, and form, full of SFHs. yet are still some of the most densely populated cities in the entire country.
Santa Ana has almost no apartments, yet has a density of 12k/sq mile
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Old 08-30-2016, 08:30 PM
 
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Today I learned that there is a Cudahy, CA.

That man got around....
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Old 08-30-2016, 11:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Santa Ana has almost no apartments, yet has a density of 12k/sq mile
We studied Santa Ana in my land use law class as an example of bad planning
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Old 08-31-2016, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,892 posts, read 3,013,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I wish Houston was just the inner loop. If it was, the density would be 5,200+ ppsm right now. Not high by any means but surprisingly high for a sunbelt post WW2 city.
Yes, but then Houston wouldn't get credit for being the "4th largest city in the US and gaining quick on Chicago." Can't have it both ways, Houstonians.

I'm surprised by how low Austin's is. Didn't realize it was that sprawlish.
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Old 08-31-2016, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,409,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I would say the population density numbers that have shocked me the most are some of the prominent midwest cities: Cleveland, Cincinatti, St. Louis, Detroit, etc. I believe the cities feel more dense/urban than the density numbers reveal. Also, Richmond VA suprises me because the city feels more dense to me than the population density numbers of 3,292.6 people per square mile. New Orleans is another city with suprisingly low population density numbers in my opinion.
Cleveland, Cincy, Saint Louis, Detroit all have lost considerable amounts of people since their respective peaks. Detroit in particular has a significant amount of vacant land and and entire blocks that are abandoned, hence bringing down the city's overall density. Thus the architecture/built environment and of these cities reflect their pasts as America's most thriving urban centers and maybe that's why their current population density figures aren't as high as one would expect.


Detroit
2015 Population estimate - 677,116
1950 Peak Population- 1,849,568
Percentage Loss-63.39%


Cincy
2015 Population estimate- 298,550
1950 Peak Population-503,998
Percentage Loss-40.7%

Cleveland
2015 Population estimate-388,072
1950 Peak Population-914,808
Percentage Loss-57.5%

Saint Louis
2015 Population estimate- 315,685
1950 Peak Population-856,796
Percentage Loss-63.1%
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Old 08-31-2016, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,892 posts, read 3,013,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
One thing I've always been surprised about is how low the densities of Atlanta, Houston , and Dallas are. Barely around 3,500 ppsm. There are plenty of suburbs in this country with average densities of around 5k-6k ppsm. The latter half of the 20th century was not kind of these cities. Atlanta at one point had an average density of nearly 9,000 ppsm in 1950, but annexation and suburban flight really dropped the numbers over time.
Those are all really big cities. I think DFW metro is as large as Connecticut.
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