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Old 08-31-2016, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Seattle's urban neighborhoods are quite dense and very active with pedestrian life. These sights stand in sharp contrast to Seattle's more prevalent urban makeup: detached single family houses with large front and back yards -- a lifestyle that is defended tooth and nail by vehement NIMBYs who want all the benefits of living in a city while maintaining a very suburban / semi-rural lifestyle. Many North Seattle neighborhoods don't even have sidewalks.
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Old 08-31-2016, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I would say the population density numbers that have shocked me the most are some of the prominent midwest cities: Cleveland, Cincinatti, St. Louis, Detroit, etc. I believe the cities feel more dense/urban than the density numbers reveal. Also, Richmond VA suprises me because the city feels more dense to me than the population density numbers of 3,292.6 people per square mile. New Orleans is another city with suprisingly low population density numbers in my opinion.
That's because their built environment is much denser than the population that lives within it. All of those cities when at their peak populations had quite high population densities, notably higher than many cities that are peaking in population today. Some cities have very dense cores but are too large spatially so the density statistics get diluted. A classic example may be Richmond, VA, or Columbus, OH.
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Old 08-31-2016, 03:58 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,922,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Atlanta's density is lower than that of the suburban Town of Hempstead in New York
But I'm sure you realize that density levels aren't consistent throughout the entire city...there are many areas of Atlanta that are quite densely populated - just like in any other city.

Hempstead NY is also more dense than Miami, Washington DC, Chicago, and most any major US city. At over 14K/square mile it's a very dense town...and no one ever said that a "suburban town" can't be densely populated, because many of them are.
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Old 08-31-2016, 06:23 PM
 
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Atlanta's census tracts topped out a 21,190/sm in 2010, for Tract 1202 in Midtown. That one is presumably much denser now. But a city of Altanta's size would normally have a denser peak. Cities with peak densities at least twice that include the obvious biggies plus LA, Seattle, Baltimore, Miami... Houston too but that's the jail.
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Old 08-31-2016, 07:48 PM
 
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These density figures are about 5 years out of date, some cities have further densified since then, others have lost density.

20,000ppsm densities
New York: 8,133,721
London: 3,345,638
Los Angeles: 1,957,346
Chicago: 1,120,257
Toronto: 993,659
Montreal: 803,131
SF-Oakland: 746,826
Philadelphia: 743,549
Boston: 559,756
Washington DC: 318,232
Vancouver: 295,282
Miami: 272,074
Honolulu: 145,363
San Diego: 99,539
Baltimore: 77,946
Seattle: 58,192

30,000 ppsm or more

New York: 6,638,237
London: 1,632,807
Los Angeles: 582,817
Toronto: 404,272
Chicago: 380,879
Montreal: 376,068
SF-Oakland: 328,494
Philadelphia: 237,754
Boston: 213,268
Vancouver: 145,090
Washington DC: 146,061
Miami: 92,969
Honolulu: 90,672
San Diego: 20,907
Seattle: 19,134
Baltimore: 15,506

50,000 ppsm or more
New York: 4,537,104
London: 302,260
Toronto: 173,254
Los Angeles: 105,717
SF-Oakland: 93,803
Chicago: 89,369
Boston: 56,569
Vancouver: 50,421
Montreal: 36,338
Honolulu: 31,009
Philadelphia: 29,908
Washington DC: 26,379
Miami: 19,316
Baltimore: 5,237
Seattle: 4,921
San Diego: 4,921
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Old 08-31-2016, 08:06 PM
 
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Seattle's numbers have grown substantially on those lists -- the first two since some tracts have entered new categories according to State OFM statistics. Plus a little because the tracts grew even if they've stayed in the same category. Still way beyind the really dense cities of course.
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Old 09-01-2016, 10:10 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Hempstead NY is also more dense than Miami, Washington DC, Chicago, and most any major US city. At over 14K/square mile it's a very dense town...and no one ever said that a "suburban town" can't be densely populated, because many of them are.
While it is very dense, Hempstead is not a "town" in the conventional sense as the other municipalities being compared here. Hempstead is a township consisting of 22 villages and 37 hamlets. One of Hempstead's hamlets is Levittown which is regarded by some as the prototype for American cookie-cutter suburban sprawl.

If Hempstead were to incorporate as a city, it would be the second largest in New York State.
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Old 09-01-2016, 02:49 PM
 
597 posts, read 400,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's because their built environment is much denser than the population that lives within it. All of those cities when at their peak populations had quite high population densities, notably higher than many cities that are peaking in population today. Some cities have very dense cores but are too large spatially so the density statistics get diluted. A classic example may be Richmond, VA, or Columbus, OH.
Exactly. They feel more urban/dense because of the built environment, which was built to hold many, many more people per square mile. On top of that, SOME of those cities' neighborhoods still are genuinely dense, or at least dense with people and activity (if not residents), so if you're in those areas, it all feels very much like the densely populated city it once was across the board.
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Old 09-01-2016, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,511 posts, read 2,969,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
While it is very dense, Hempstead is not a "town" in the conventional sense as the other municipalities being compared here. Hempstead is a township consisting of 22 villages and 37 hamlets. One of Hempstead's hamlets is Levittown which is regarded by some as the prototype for American cookie-cutter suburban sprawl.

If Hempstead were to incorporate as a city, it would be the second largest in New York State.
Just curious, given its density numbers (including Levittown), do those municipalities in Hempstead run into each other seamlessly?
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Old 09-01-2016, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,637 posts, read 27,042,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Yes, but then Houston wouldn't get credit for being the "4th largest city in the US and gaining quick on Chicago." Can't have it both ways, Houstonians.

I'm surprised by how low Austin's is. Didn't realize it was that sprawlish.
Austin sprawls more than Houston AND DFW. Do people actually think they getting a slice of California with that town lol.

As far as Houston losing it's "4th largest city crown". It's better in the long run if they had less to manage with.
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