U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-03-2016, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,860,994 times
Reputation: 5855

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Somerville is a city. It's outside the city of Boston, thus considered a Boston suburb, but is urban by every conceivable definition.
Well, I could use your reasoning to say that Mesa, which is a city, and has 472,000 people, is "a city", but we all know it's a suburb of Phoenix
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-03-2016, 11:52 AM
 
7,703 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8417
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Well, I could use your reasoning to say that Mesa, which is a city, and has 472,000 people, is "a city", but we all know it's a suburb of Phoenix
The major difference being that Somerville developed as a city long before suburbs as we know them came into existence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2016, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
539 posts, read 245,688 times
Reputation: 1038
Not exactly a metropolis in it's own right, but I was surprised to see that Meridian, ID has a density of 7300 ppsm. More than twice any other city or town in Idaho. Including Boise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2016, 03:00 AM
 
Location: Earth
1,305 posts, read 1,254,868 times
Reputation: 1427
I think when we look at the density of Somerville, MA or other cities like it (a few in Hudson County, NJ), we can recognize the density of the city, but understand that it is only that dense because of its proximity to Boston at its amenities. Somerville is mostly residential with very few big commercial districts. Tufts crosses the border, but overall, the city has no real big universities either. If you look at neighboring Cambridge, with its slightly lower density than Somerville, it's more of a complete city. It has areas as dense or denser than Somerville, but it also has giant business districts and two large, world class universities (and some smaller ones). If you include Boston, then you recognize that Boston has areas that are much, much denser than Somerville with much, much bigger business districts and the city has an airport and numerous parks and recreational areas. Those amenities may bring the total population density down, but the places where people live are still quite dense.

If we want to use another international example, look at Hong Kong. The city has roughly the same population density as Somerville, but that's because so much of the islands are uninhabitable due to mountainous terrain. However, if you were to step one foot in that city, you sure as hell wouldn't say, "This city feels as dense as Somerville."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2016, 05:22 AM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,490,733 times
Reputation: 6361
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
The major difference being that Somerville developed as a city long before suburbs as we know them came into existence.
Mesa was founded only 10 years after Phoenix was itself. Which while later than east coast cities is still before suburbs as we know them came into existence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2016, 05:54 AM
 
7,703 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8417
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
Mesa was founded only 10 years after Phoenix was itself. Which while later than east coast cities is still before suburbs as we know them came into existence.
Mesa had a population of 3700 in 1930. It was a glorified settlement. Mesa grew, like most suburbs, after WWII. It acted as a suburb of not just Phoenix, but also the local military installations.

Somerville, on the other hand, had a population of over 100k, in 1930. It developed as a city...urban in nature, almost since its inception. As a matter of fact, due to Boston's compact nature, Somerville functions more like an extension of Boston's urban core than a "suburb". Boston and Somerville don't even border each other, yet Sommerville's Davis Square is only 6 miles from downtown Boston. I'm not arguing the fact that Somerville exist largely in support of Boston, only that suburban is a poor adjective for describing it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 09:04 AM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,461,720 times
Reputation: 2167
Quote:
Originally Posted by CampbellGuy View Post
I have never visited, but after seeing pictures of neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, I had to shake my head. I have mainly seen such low density in highways in the mountains of California in super-small cities. I was expecting high-rises next to major hotels and stuff, kind of like a smaller Philly or like SF. To me Pittsburgh neighborhoods all looks like a distant suburban area of low population. I hardly saw any stores integrated into any neighborhoods. Very surprised.

Because of the topography, Pittsburgh has areas with high density, and also hilly areas with lots of undevelopable (steep) land, that are rather low density for a city.

But Pittsburgh's main neighborhoods are quite dense, and many are rowhouse neighborhoods like in Philly or Baltimore. So you were probably seeing pictures of the hillier areas with scattered houses. Check out pics of the South Side, Oakland, Strip District, Bloomfield, Shadyside, Lawrenceville, North Side for some of the denser areas outside of downtown.

Here is an example.. the Oakland neighborhood is in the foreground , with downtown in the background.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?vi...x=1&ajaxhist=0

Last edited by _Buster; 02-21-2017 at 09:16 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,054,090 times
Reputation: 3925
Madison in the isthmus is a lot denser than a typical mid sized Midwestern city. It has a couple of tracts around 50,000 ppsm and then a bunch of others in the 16k to 35k range. It has the densest census tract in the Midwest outside of Chicago. It is proof to the notion that density is often a product of geographical constraints.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 10:22 AM
 
913 posts, read 549,463 times
Reputation: 839
San Francisco is a lot denser than I expected. It looks more like a East Coast city than a California city. I would say the homeless there are even more aggressive than the ones in New York.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,306,053 times
Reputation: 1825
Parts of Queens that are considered "suburban" by NYers actually still have pretty high population density. I grew up in Forest Hills in Queens and I always considered it to be a pretty suburban area, and even I was surprised to learn that the population density is 25K per square mile. I guess it's really just suburban for NYC standards (ignoring Staten Island).
There are other nearby parts of Queens that have density levels that rival Manhattan.

Where I live now in Williamsburg, Brooklyn has about 71K per square mile, which is about the same as Manhattan overall. I just looked that up right now here on CD and I was surprised to learn that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top