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View Poll Results: When I think of Pennsylvania...
I generally have a favorable opinion of the state. 94 53.41%
I generally have an unfavorable opinion of the state. 30 17.05%
I have no strong opinion regarding the state. 52 29.55%
Voters: 176. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-09-2019, 05:57 AM
 
2,017 posts, read 607,176 times
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I'm from New York and I love Pennsylvania.
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Old 08-09-2019, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
684 posts, read 264,503 times
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Love PA. Well-balanced state that checks off a lot of boxes.
Some of my biggest hobbies are there, with all the mountains (skiing, hiking, etc.) and multiple high-quality amusement parks.
Philly - one of our favorite cities, so much to do, good people, and isn't as wallet-busting as the rest of the Bos-Wash corridor. Only major gripe is apparently there's an additional city income tax on top of the state one. But it's still on our shortlist to live in next.
Pittsburgh - also amazing
Harrisburg - fun nightlife, need to revisit to experience what the rest of the city has to offer though

There's still a lot more of the state we need to visit
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Old 08-09-2019, 07:05 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,804 posts, read 5,190,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I used to have a very positive impression of the state: two major yet very different American cities, old architecture, a ton of history, Ben Franklin, the Amish. It was near the top of my list of states to move to when I was in high school and college.

Lately my perception is a little less positive since the rural areas managed to swing the state for Trump and I've learned from a couple friends who used to live there about the issues with bigotry and closed-mindedness that are present and how much the majority of young people want to get out of there. (I think this is less true of smaller towns in, say, Washington.)
I get that, but this problem is by no means unique to PA. You find hateful bigots in every single US state.
There was actually an issue of anonymous people posting hateful fliers in a wealthy Philadelphia neighborhood a few weeks ago. Those suspects were tracked down and all lived in New Jersey...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Go to Kentucky and then come back here and post. Very different places.
Agreed, that whole "Pennsyltucky" thing drives me nuts. I have been to South Carolina, Georgia, Arkansas, Mississippi, Kansas and Florida for work, and PA has NOTHING on any of them.

PA has a lot of rundown little industrial towns by highways, I guess that is misleading to people?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
When I hear "generic US state", I think of something in the 3-7 million population range, not super liberal or conservative, one major city but 1-2 "regional" cities that people have heard of and that exert some influence, some immigrants and ethnic minorities in the cities but mostly white German/British Isles ancestry in all the rural areas, and a balanced and moderately strong economy including healthcare, manufacturing, and agricultural sectors. The kind of state that you hear about from time to time and isn't totally forgotten, but can still be seen as kind of a rural backwater.

Pennsylvania fulfills some of that, but states like Wisconsin, Iowa, and Oregon are better candidates.

For least generic: Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexico, Wyoming, New Jersey?
I would not consider PA a generic state. Philadelphia alone is enough to take the state out of the generic bucket.

I don't really consider any Northeastern state "generic" A lot of Midwestern and Southern states would certainly qualify as generic before PA.
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Old 08-09-2019, 07:31 AM
 
9,682 posts, read 13,578,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm from New York and I love Pennsylvania.
Ditto
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Old 08-09-2019, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,501 posts, read 7,577,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
PA has a lot of rundown little industrial towns by highways, I guess that is misleading to people?

I would not consider PA a generic state. Philadelphia alone is enough to take the state out of the generic bucket.

I don't really consider any Northeastern state "generic" A lot of Midwestern and Southern states would certainly qualify as generic before PA.
This, times 1,000%.

To be sure, every state has "generic" features. We are a heavily globalized society, after all. I'd also caution against calling any whole state generic; each has its own distinct facets.

But Pennsylvania absolutely has a very distinct history, vibe and overall feel that does somewhat objectively make it amongst the least generic in the US. It has a patina (and I mean that in the best way) with which few other states in the US could compare. And yes, each of those small, "insignificant" rural PA towns has a very interesting story to tell, whether or not some care to listen.

Heck, even few Pennsylvanians know that a resource as monumental as petroleum has its roots in Oil Creek, PA.

So, yes, if one's only explored Philly, Pittsburgh and the PA Turnpike, there's an incredible amount of history and interesting scenery that's being written off.

A place doesn't receive the moniker of "Keystone State" by being forgettable and disinteresting.
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Old 08-09-2019, 11:11 AM
 
9,682 posts, read 13,578,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
This, times 1,000%.

To be sure, every state has "generic" features. We are a heavily globalized society, after all. I'd also caution against calling any whole state generic; each has its own distinct facets.

But Pennsylvania absolutely has a very distinct history, vibe and overall feel that does somewhat objectively make it amongst the least generic in the US. It has a patina (and I mean that in the best way) with which few other states in the US could compare. And yes, each of those small, "insignificant" rural PA towns has a very interesting story to tell, whether or not some care to listen.

Heck, even few Pennsylvanians know that a resource as monumental as petroleum has its roots in Oil Creek, PA.

So, yes, if one's only explored Philly, Pittsburgh and the PA Turnpike, there's an incredible amount of history and interesting scenery that's being written off.

A place doesn't receive the moniker of "Keystone State" by being forgettable and disinteresting.
& I mean it has a town called "intercourse"
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Old 08-09-2019, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,289 posts, read 2,904,919 times
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If not at the absolute top, Pennsylvania is one if my three or four favorite states for sure!

Pittsburgh is an amazing place, one of the most unique large cities in the nation. I've enjoyed many of the smaller cities and towns as well----->Williamsport, Hershey, Harrisburg, Gettysburg. I love PA, wouldn't call it generic at all...
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Old 08-09-2019, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Boise
52 posts, read 64,312 times
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I visited Pittsburgh once just to visit, drove east from Michigan into the state then south to leave, so I haven't seen a ton of Pennsylvania.

But honestly, Pittsburgh is one of my favorite cities I've visited in the US. Had amazing topography, and just felt like a very vibrant and livable place.

Much of rural Pennsylvania feels like it's been stereotyped into sort of a backwoods Appalachian vibe, like West Virginia-north. I don't know how true this is but it's sort of my perception.

Philadelphia is the only major east coast city I've not yet visited. I always used to overlook it in my mind compared to places like DC, New York, and Boston, but lately I've researched it a little bit more and am finding myself fascinated. It seems like it could be a good place to live that's still relatively affordable but also urban and amenity-rich. I would love to visit sometime soon.
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
7,293 posts, read 8,283,415 times
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It's alright.
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:56 PM
 
1,735 posts, read 1,394,356 times
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Uh, I kind of view it as ... even though technically it's in the North, it probably has more in common with Kansas or Arkansas than it does its neighboring states. Obviously I'm aware of Philly, just saying overall.
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