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View Poll Results: When I think of Pennsylvania...
I generally have a favorable opinion of the state. 94 53.41%
I generally have an unfavorable opinion of the state. 30 17.05%
I have no strong opinion regarding the state. 52 29.55%
Voters: 176. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-11-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,237 posts, read 18,077,132 times
Reputation: 14701

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Pennsylvania is spread far too thinly regarding the investing of infrastructure in the state as well as improving it up to modern standards. That is an ongoing issue that will not be solved easily. Examples include: bridges, roads, highway, highway design, traffic lights, etc.
That's because PennDOT maintains almost as many miles of roads as ConnDOT, MaineDOT, MassDOT, NHDOT, NJDOT, NYSDOT, PANYNJ, RIDOT and VTrans combined.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:51 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,237 posts, read 18,077,132 times
Reputation: 14701
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
Yeah. It sucks butt that Trump stole PA by 43,000 votes. 0.72 % of the state population. Well, at least PA isn't alone in this regard. Michigan turned on the democrats too.
Pennsylvania is one of six states that flipped in 2016. The good news for Michiganders, Ohioans and Wisconsinites is that nobody calls them dumb hicks for it, the way they call Pennsylvanians, Iowans and white Floridians. Strangely, many Ohioans call Pennsylvanians dumb hicks as well, much like the pot calling the kettle "cookware of color."
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Old 08-12-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
380 posts, read 148,095 times
Reputation: 652
Fair warning, the first part of this is very much a small memoir, writing as a former outsider who is now an insider:

I grew up in Upstate NY just over the border of PA (Southern Tier of NY). My dad's whole side of the family was Pennsylvanian through and through: one side being quintessential Pennsylvanian Dutch Lutherans, the other Quakers who originally fled England to PA for its religious liberties. My mom's side was totally Irish Catholics who farmed and owned businesses in rural Upstate NY. We visited North Central PA often. My mom is highly opinionated, and constantly compared PA (unfavorably) to NY.

Between my mom's opinionatedness, and my own young observations, it was hard for me to not to draw conclusions. My dad's side of the family were mostly conservative in every aspect: many did not drink, our meals were quiet and started with prayer, they were politically conservative, yet it was very taboo to talk politics (perhaps because they knew of my mom's liberal opinions), etc. My mom's side in NY, on the other hand, were loud, many drank somewhat heavily, many were progressive / Democratic blue collar types, etc.

These personal observations are of course not at all "scientific" and very specific to my life. However, as an outsider, I always understood PA to be the conservative brother to NY.

Now living here, I do very much understand the nuances of PA. It really is a state that celebrates its history, and many generational Pennsylvanians are very proud of their heritage here. However, I do think it is telling that there are some specific problems because PA can seem so "stuck in the past." Yes, the whole nation's infrastructure is crumbling, but Pennsylvania takes it to a new level. Our gas taxes are the second highest in the nation, we are among top in the nation for toll road mileage, and yet we are severely underhighwayed and many of our roads are in serious need of a facelift (just drive pretty much anywhere in Philadelphia proper).

The disparity between rural and urban is stark in many states, but I do think it is particularly pronounced in PA. Philadelphia truly feels like a different world from the rest of the state. Because of the city's less than favorable reputation through much of the 20th century, many Pennsylvanians still have no desire to visit or associate themselves with the rest of the state. I think the feeling is too often mutual in Philadelphia, with many negative and overly generalized stereotypes about rural PA. I do think the 2016 election results in Pennsylvania exacerbated this feeling in Philadelphia. Metro Pittsburgh, South Central PA and the Lehigh Valley are where these worlds come together a bit, with more medium sized cities and suburbs that tend to be more moderate.

Overall, I agree with the outsiders who say Pennsylvania is underrated in regards to natural beauty and outdoor recreation. The Poconos, The PA Grand Canyon, Ohiopyle, and Presque Isle are just a few standouts. It is also underrated in regards to cultural institutions and cities. Honestly, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are my two favorite major cities in the entire Northeast for livability, a big part of which for me includes cost of living. They are both highly urban and vibrant -- especially Philadelphia -- yet are much more affordable than Boston, NYC and D.C. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's second city, out does any of New York's second cities on a number of levels (Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Albany). I say this as a native Upstate New Yorker.


With all of its problems, I love living in Pennsylvania.
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:13 AM
 
298 posts, read 99,581 times
Reputation: 264
Pittsburgh and Philly are the obvious outliers, but as whole it's a pass through state imho
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:45 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,804 posts, read 5,190,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joakim3 View Post
Pittsburgh and Philly are the obvious outliers, but as whole it's a pass through state imho
Wouldn't every state be a pass through state if the biggest cities were outliers??

New York would certainly be a pass through without New York City (which is certainly an outlier)...

I don't get the logic.

Last edited by cpomp; 08-12-2019 at 10:46 AM.. Reason: edit
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,351 posts, read 67,604,028 times
Reputation: 16053
I know this is an old thread, but I just wanted to thank everyone thus far for their participation.

It seems like if PA had to have a national reputation it would be "slightly positive". Liberals seem to hold the state shifting to the right to vote for Trump in contempt while conservatives are more endeared towards PA for this reason.

In my opinion PA is a very balanced state between conservative/liberal, rural/suburban/urban, Democrat/Republican, white-collar and blue-collar, mountain vs. lakes vs. valleys vs. flat farmlands, etc. There is a LOT of history in PA. Being an old state, though, means we also have deteriorating infrastructure.

I've lived in PA 30 of my 32 years, and I'd also view it in a slightly positive light.
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Boston
2,575 posts, read 1,429,657 times
Reputation: 2339
Rundown urban areas with a nice major city in Philly. But mainly kind of rural rust belty midwestern. Some more typical suburban area in eastern PA. Not that desirable to me. Not very diverse ethnically. 'Typical old school America' along with Ohio. States like MO and IA are also 'America' but slightly different...to an outsider-obviously i know PA and IA are extremely different
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:00 PM
 
5,599 posts, read 7,040,845 times
Reputation: 2847
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Rundown urban areas with a nice major city in Philly. But mainly kind of rural rust belty midwestern. Some more typical suburban area in eastern PA. Not that desirable to me. Not very diverse ethnically. 'Typical old school America' along with Ohio. States like MO and IA are also 'America' but slightly different...to an outsider-obviously i know PA and IA are extremely different
Rust belt started in the northeast. Not sure why people always refer to Rust Belt as a midwestern thing.
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:27 PM
 
57,259 posts, read 81,672,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Rundown urban areas with a nice major city in Philly. But mainly kind of rural rust belty midwestern. Some more typical suburban area in eastern PA. Not that desirable to me. Not very diverse ethnically. 'Typical old school America' along with Ohio. States like MO and IA are also 'America' but slightly different...to an outsider-obviously i know PA and IA are extremely different
If anything, it is more so than MA. Look up demographics for Harrisburg, Lancaster, York, Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton, Reading, Lebanon, Chambersburg, Erie, Hazleton, Wilkes-Barre, Williamsport, East Stroudsburg, Stroudsburg, Steelton, Susquehanna Township and even places like Farrell, Johnstown, Sharon and Scranton. You may be surprised and this isn't including places that surround Philadelphia or Pittsburgh that may also be a surprise demographically(Aliquippa, Clairton, McKeesport, Homestead, Norristown, Phoenixville, Chester, West Chester, Uniontown, Washington, Coatesville, etc.). Then, you have a place like Carlisle, which has a mayor that is black. So, it is more so than what some may think.
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
380 posts, read 148,095 times
Reputation: 652
Quote:
Because of the city's less than favorable reputation through much of the 20th century, many Pennsylvanians still have no desire to visit or associate themselves with the rest of the state.
This should read visit or associate themselves with the city (Philadelphia)
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