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Old 09-01-2016, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,230,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The German heritage of Kansas and Missouri (among other Midwestern states) must be very strong. I remember reading the article of that horrible death in Kansas City Schlitterbahn, and so many people mentioned in the article had German surnames, and I mean HARDCORE wienerschnitzel style surnames lol I don't mean Americanised "Miller" "Smith" instead of "Schmidt" no I mean names that are so German, they sound like the name of a kitschy Bavarian pub. I know that in places that are not as German, many of the German Americans changed their surnames to a more pronounceable name, but I guess in heavily German parts of the Midwest, it's such a predominant ethnicity that the original names were unchanged. (Or there wasn't many non-Germans that they married)

Come to think of it, pretty much everyone I personally know that is from Kansas or has Kansas roots (including two roommates, one that used to live with me, another that still does) has German heritage or German surnames.

However the south has lots of Germans too, though, especially Texas. That's one thing Texas shares with its Midwestern plains neighbours further north is a large amount of central European influence, particularly German and Czech.
Texas doesn't have an especially high number of Germans compared to the Midwest. The South doesn't have a lot of Germans. That is simply false. The South is predominantly English or "American."
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Old 09-01-2016, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Texas doesn't have an especially high number of Germans compared to the Midwest. The South doesn't have a lot of Germans. That is simply false. The South is predominantly English or "American."
I said Texas has a lot of Germans compared to the rest of the South not Midwest. I know it's not Wisconsin.

And there's definitely a lot of German heritage down here. For cryin' out loud we got a town called "Luckenbach."

German ancestry is more prevalent in the South than you realise. http://www15.uta.fi/FAST/US1/REF/images/usgerman.gif

Notice the blue in states like Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kentucky, North Carolina and Florida. It's not as much as Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska or the Dakotas but its still significant enough. Also Texas is the only state with red county dots.

The South is very diverse its not the same throughout. It's a lot of English, Scottish, Irish, African, Cajun, French, Spanish, Creole etc. etc. and yes, Germans.

I will say the Deep South is not very German, but the Deep South is not all there is to the South.
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Old 09-02-2016, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I said Texas has a lot of Germans compared to the rest of the South not Midwest. I know it's not Wisconsin.

And there's definitely a lot of German heritage down here. For cryin' out loud we got a town called "Luckenbach."

German ancestry is more prevalent in the South than you realise. http://www15.uta.fi/FAST/US1/REF/images/usgerman.gif

Notice the blue in states like Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kentucky, North Carolina and Florida. It's not as much as Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska or the Dakotas but its still significant enough. Also Texas is the only state with red county dots.

The South is very diverse its not the same throughout. It's a lot of English, Scottish, Irish, African, Cajun, French, Spanish, Creole etc. etc. and yes, Germans.

I will say the Deep South is not very German, but the Deep South is not all there is to the South.
German isn't a dominant ancestry per county in Texas. It's not as big as in the Midwest and other states outside of the South. Texas may have a lot of Germans but compared to places like Pennsylvania and Ohio and Missouri the amount of Germans is minimal. Florida only has a lot of Germans because of the Northerners that have settled there over the past half century. The South simply does not have a lot of Germans compared to other regions in this country. To say otherwise is a ridiculous and untrue argument.
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Old 09-02-2016, 11:53 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,324,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
German isn't a dominant ancestry per county in Texas. It's not as big as in the Midwest and other states outside of the South. Texas may have a lot of Germans but compared to places like Pennsylvania and Ohio and Missouri the amount of Germans is minimal.
I wonder how those figures would compare as a gross total, versus a percentage of population. There's a lot of people in Texas.

Last edited by SPonteKC; 09-02-2016 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 09-03-2016, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
German isn't a dominant ancestry per county in Texas. It's not as big as in the Midwest and other states outside of the South. Texas may have a lot of Germans but compared to places like Pennsylvania and Ohio and Missouri the amount of Germans is minimal. Florida only has a lot of Germans because of the Northerners that have settled there over the past half century. The South simply does not have a lot of Germans compared to other regions in this country. To say otherwise is a ridiculous and untrue argument.
Never said it was that big compared to the North, dude. But you're also underplaying the German heritage here. Btw I had a LOT of high school teachers in Florida who had German surnames, and thick or at least mild, southern accents. So its not all just northerners that move there that have German heritage.

Here's some reading on German Texans: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Texan
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Old 10-05-2016, 04:42 PM
 
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I think Midwest is Northern exclusively but hey thats just me
-WT
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Old 10-06-2016, 10:35 AM
 
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Interesting question. No, not at all. There is a distinct southern influence in Missouri, starting in and around St. Louis and going south.
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Old 10-06-2016, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Southern Nevada
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I've heard regions referred to as "upper Midwest" or "lower Midwest" but usually only on weather reports.
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Old 10-06-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,886 posts, read 6,209,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yes. Some might argue that parts of the Midwest like downstate Illinois or the MO bootheel are "southern" but one region having southern influence (because no duh, it's a bordering area) doesn't make it southern. It's still the north. I actually noticed a big difference crossing from Oklahoma to Kansas, not in topography, but in architecture and in culture. Just a little north of Wichita there's like almost zero southern influence. The accents are different, pop is used more than coke, there seems to be a different vibe, more two storey houses. Little things like that make a big difference. A lot more of the stereotypical red barns.
This is actually fascinating. I grew up about 20 miles south of the Kansas border in Oklahoma and noticed the same thing. Draw an east west line in Wichita and take the line to the Missouri border. To the east of I-35 and below that line you see a little bit of southern, but above that line, really none at all.

Where I lived in Oklahoma, I'd say that we were influenced by the Midwestern aspect of Kansas much more than other parts of Oklahoma. And much of northwestern Oklahoma is the same. Particularly among the older land owning families. Virtually all of those who came in the land runs to northern Oklahoma were from Midwestern States.
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:19 PM
 
Location: IN
20,863 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
This is actually fascinating. I grew up about 20 miles south of the Kansas border in Oklahoma and noticed the same thing. Draw an east west line in Wichita and take the line to the Missouri border. To the east of I-35 and below that line you see a little bit of southern, but above that line, really none at all.

Where I lived in Oklahoma, I'd say that we were influenced by the Midwestern aspect of Kansas much more than other parts of Oklahoma. And much of northwestern Oklahoma is the same. Particularly among the older land owning families. Virtually all of those who came in the land runs to northern Oklahoma were from Midwestern States.
The overall southern feel stretches further north in Missouri compared to Kansas based on my experience. You drive south of KC, MO and it is very much like the most areas of the South overall within a few dozen miles.
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