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Old 09-01-2016, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Picturesque, middle America, small bustling downtown. I love his art work. I know he painted NYC as well.
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Old 09-01-2016, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Picturesque, middle America, small bustling downtown. I love his art work. I know he painted NYC as well.
Norman Rockwell was from the Northeast/New England.
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Old 09-01-2016, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Norman Rockwell lived and worked in Stockbridge, MA. The museum there houses his work. Stockbridge is very quaint, and well worth visiting. New England has many towns that have the same feeling as his paintings. I was just in MA last week, and passed through several towns like this.
If you go to Stockbridge, make sure to dine at The Red Lion Inn.
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Old 09-01-2016, 07:13 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Picturesque, middle America, small bustling downtown. I love his art work. I know he painted NYC as well.
That is because he grew up in New York City and lived there and nearby suburbs for many years.

But because he began to be a illustrator for national magazines while he was still a teenager, many of his painting and drawings have a "Americana" look to them. Not so much a specific city or town but a generalized American city or town that anyone could identify with.

There is something about his paintings that are innocent, quaint and comforting to people.
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Old 09-01-2016, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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I think a place like Ann Arbor, w/o the giant university in it has the feel.
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Old 09-01-2016, 07:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I think a place like Ann Arbor, w/o the giant university in it has the feel.
How? It is quite urban and while it has areas in its Downtown that look like some of his paintings, it definitely has more modern urbanity.


Anyway, I'd say that a place like Skaneateles NY would work: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sk...!6m1!1e1?hl=en
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Old 09-01-2016, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Greenwood, Mississippi.

https://padresteve.files.wordpress.c...njustice-1.jpg

Last edited by JMT; 09-01-2016 at 10:01 AM..
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Picturesque, middle America, small bustling downtown. I love his art work. I know he painted NYC as well.
Though Norman Rockwell supposedly depicted life in New England, I agree it always felt (and still does) seems more representative of small town life in the Midwest/Plains states.
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
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When I think of Rockwell, I think of the Berkshires, or some of the more "alive" communities in Western Mass and Southern Vermont.

Northampton, MA jumps out the most, although it is kind of collegiate. Stockbridge (for obvious reasons) is another one and neighboring Lee as well. I've always thought Shelburne Falls fits the description nicely too. In Vermont, Brattleboro and Bellows Falls jump out the most, but there are others. I've always felt Littleton, NH and Keene, NH gave off the vibe as well.

Aesthetically speaking, there are probably hundreds of older towns in New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest that fit the bill. The hard (and sad) part is trying to find one that A) Is still vibrant/active and B) not built around a major university.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Though Norman Rockwell supposedly depicted life in New England, I agree it always felt (and still does) seems more representative of small town life in the Midwest/Plains states.
There's probably some truth to that. When Norman Rockwell depicted life in rural New England, it was at a time that life in that area looked a lot more like life in the Midwest. It's different now, although many of those towns in the Berkshires and CT/VT are still good examples of the world of Rockwell.
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Old 09-01-2016, 10:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
When I think of Rockwell, I think of the Berkshires, or some of the more "alive" communities in Western Mass and Southern Vermont.

Northampton, MA jumps out the most, although it is kind of collegiate. Stockbridge (for obvious reasons) is another one and neighboring Lee as well. I've always thought Shelburne Falls fits the description nicely too. In Vermont, Brattleboro and Bellows Falls jump out the most, but there are others. I've always felt Littleton, NH and Keene, NH gave off the vibe as well.

Aesthetically speaking, there are probably hundreds of older towns in New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest that fit the bill. The hard (and sad) part is trying to find one that A) Is still vibrant/active and B) not built around a major university.



There's probably some truth to that. When Norman Rockwell depicted life in rural New England, it was at a time that life in that area looked a lot more like life in the Midwest. It's different now, although many of those towns in the Berkshires and CT/VT are still good examples of the world of Rockwell.
I was going to say that you get the sense from his paintings of a more simpler time in a quaint small town setting. I think the architecture of the communities in his paintings gives off a New England/Northeastern small town look.

Hudson NY, a small, vibrant and ethnically diverse city of about 6500 south of Albany would fit. It is actually known for its art/antique scene and doesn't have a college. Nearby Chatham is another community that has that look.

Owego, Clayton and Watkins Glen are a few NY villages that would fit as well. Seneca Falls(a CDP/former village) is another one. Same for East Aurora and Cooperstown.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-01-2016 at 11:16 AM..
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