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Old 09-04-2016, 06:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
This map's South Atlantic is pretty much my Sourheast, except for the fact that I put Maryland in the Northeast.
I gotcha but it's more common to consider the South Atlantic (minus MD and DE, maybe WV) plus the East South Central as the Southeast. The Mississippi River tends to be the dividing line for most, more or less.
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Old 09-04-2016, 06:41 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Default The Southeast

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
There's a thread in the city versus city for him and asking people to vote on best Southeastern College cities, but by my estimation, only half of those cities are actually in the Southeast. I had always assumed that the southeast referred only to the Atlantic coast states south of Washington DC. How would you define it?
The Southeast are the Southern states EAST of the Mississippi River.

---------West Virginia --
----- Kentucky -- Virginia
Tennessee -- North Carolina
----------------South Carolina
Mississippi - Alabama - Georgia
------------------Florida--------

There is no official Census Bureau definition of the southeastern United States. However, the Association of American Geographers defines the southeastern United States as Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southe...s#Demographics
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Old 09-04-2016, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
Yes, and the same now goes for Texas and Oklahoma as well.

However, the fact that ALL share a history of being considered "the West" for at least some point in time, allow them all to belong together with their own region. The entire region from AL as far west at least to East Texas is its own region.
The scenery of Texas is actually western, however. It's mostly plains, and further west its desert and canyons. Ditto for Oklahoma. Texas' westernmost point is further west than Denver.

Can't get much more western than cowboys and open ranges.
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Old 09-04-2016, 05:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The scenery of Texas is actually western, however. It's mostly plains, and further west its desert and canyons. Ditto for Oklahoma. Texas' westernmost point is further west than Denver.
Pecos Texas is desert/canyons, and only the Panhandle/West Texas area has the type of plains that can be considered western ("the semi-arid, short-grass high prairies). Everywhere else in Texas is either forest/woodland, or humid coastal plain.

This doesn't account for the fact that "Southern" is a matter of culture, not really geography. West Texas has pretty much everything typical of the South (especially the Bible Belt), but it just happens to be in a semi-arid landscape.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Can't get much more western than cowboys and open ranges.
You do realize they had these things in the SE US, right? Florida actually has stronger cowboy history than all of Texas does:
http://floridacrackersmovie.com/
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Old 09-04-2016, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The scenery of Texas is actually western, however. It's mostly plains, and further west its desert and canyons. Ditto for Oklahoma. Texas' westernmost point is further west than Denver.

Can't get much more western than cowboys and open ranges.
It's amazing how similar New Mexico looks to most of Texas. If it weren't for the border sign you truly would not notice any difference.

Definitely prototypical Western.
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Old 09-04-2016, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
Pecos Texas is desert/canyons, and only the Panhandle/West Texas area has the type of plains that can be considered western ("the semi-arid, short-grass high prairies). Everywhere else in Texas is either forest/woodland, or humid coastal plain.

This doesn't account for the fact that "Southern" is a matter of culture, not really geography. West Texas has pretty much everything typical of the South (especially the Bible Belt), but it just happens to be in a semi-arid landscape.



You do realize they had these things in the SE US, right? Florida actually has stronger cowboy history than all of Texas does:
http://floridacrackersmovie.com/
Florida had cowboys before Texas, yes, though they lack the vast open ranges. The cowboy culture is a small part of Florida, but its a big part of Texas' identity and greatly shaped its history.

I'm sorry but there's nothing eastern about the scenery surrounding Dallas. It's wide open plains, the beginning of the west.

Even though much of west Texas is the Bible Belt, it's not the same type you'd find in Alabama or Mississippi. It's not as judgy, as holier than thou or as homophobic as it is further east. I feel more comfortable holding another man's hand in rural west Texas than I would in rural Louisiana, rural Mississippi, rural Alabama, rural Georgie. etc. etc.

It's very Christian, but it's also more "let and let live" which is a western American mindset. Plus its a bit more diverse as you're likely to see more Lutherans and Catholics than the eastern part of the Bible Belt.
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Old 09-04-2016, 07:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Florida had cowboys before Texas, yes, though they lack the vast open ranges. The cowboy culture is a small part of Florida, but its a big part of Texas' identity and greatly shaped its history.
Florida had areas of open space as well; you can even find areas of prairie in the state. The cowboy culture in Texas, although often talked about, wasn't a biggest part of the state's history either; the vast majority of Texans were small farmers, in actuality. A lot of the cowboy history in the state is overplayed and exaggerated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I'm sorry but there's nothing eastern about the scenery surrounding Dallas. It's wide open plains, the beginning of the west.
Again, just because there is prairie doesn't mean it is western; you will find wide open prairie even in Illinois. The prairie areas that surrounds Dallas is of the humid, eastern type, and the overall landscape isn't even a true prairie; Dallas really is in a woodland zone known as the Cross Timbers:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_Timbers

The western prairies are semi-arid; nowhere in DFW has that climate type.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Even though much of west Texas is the Bible Belt, it's not the same type you'd find in Alabama or Mississippi. It's not as judgy, as holier than thou or as homophobic as it is further east. I feel more comfortable holding another man's hand in rural west Texas than I would in rural Louisiana, rural Mississippi, rural Alabama, rural Georgie. etc. etc.

It's very Christian, but it's also more "let and let live" which is a western American mindset. Plus its a bit more diverse as you're likely to see more Lutherans and Catholics than the eastern part of the Bible Belt.
It still is in the Bible Belt. Texas has an overall more Catholic influence, but the Bible Belt region is very strong (especially in the northwestern area of the state). All the southern culture still exists in much of West Texas, just the geography is different. On the other hand, all of Texas from I-35 eastwards has little/nothing western about it at all; places like Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston, Beaumont, etc have nothing to do with the West.
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Old 09-04-2016, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
Florida had areas of open space as well; you can even find areas of prairie in the state. The cowboy culture in Texas, although often talked about, wasn't a biggest part of the state's history either; the vast majority of Texans were small farmers, in actuality. A lot of the cowboy history in the state is overplayed and exaggerated.



Again, just because there is prairie doesn't mean it is western; you will find wide open prairie even in Illinois. The prairie areas that surrounds Dallas is of the humid, eastern type, and the overall landscape isn't even a true prairie; Dallas really is in a woodland zone known as the Cross Timbers:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_Timbers

The western prairies are semi-arid; nowhere in DFW has that climate type.



It still is in the Bible Belt. Texas has an overall more Catholic influence, but the Bible Belt region is very strong (especially in the northwestern area of the state). All the southern culture still exists in much of West Texas, just the geography is different. On the other hand, all of Texas from I-35 eastwards has little/nothing western about it at all; places like Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston, Beaumont, etc have nothing to do with the West.

The landscape around Dallas is not the same as the prairies in northern Missouri or Iowa which is far more lush. You go a little bit west of Fort Worth and there's zero eastern-ness there. I used to live in Eastland County, the eastern part of West Texas. It's scrubby plains scenery with cacti and sprawling woods of mesquite. That's the west, honey. That's the Southwest. Yes, it's the South, but it's not the Southeast. Dallas is in the transition of east-west, but it lies on the western side of such a transition, not the eastern side.

Why does all the west have to look the same to be the west? Not all of it has to be so dry. Dallas is still relatively dry anyway. It's when you reach about Canton or so, where its truly eastern looking. Shreveport and Dallas are not that far away but are in two different geographic biomes. One's in the plains, the other in the piney woods.

What part of Florida are you talking about? I grew up down there and been to nearly every corner of the state and the only "prairie" I can think of is the Everglades and sawgrass prairie, which is a marsh. The state is mostly swamps and woods. The "prairies" in Florida are swamps.
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Old 09-04-2016, 08:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The landscape around Dallas is not the same as the prairies in northern Missouri or Iowa which is far more lush. You go a little bit west of Fort Worth and there's zero eastern-ness there. I used to live in Eastland County, the eastern part of West Texas. It's scrubby plains scenery with cacti and sprawling woods of mesquite. That's the west, honey. That's the Southwest. Yes, it's the South, but it's not the Southeast. Dallas is in the transition of east-west, but it lies on the western side of such a transition, not the eastern side.
Yes, those scrubby, plains areas are WEST of the DFW metro. Like I said, the I-35 corridor and eastward has the eastern aesthetic as it regards scenery. The DFW landscape is a humid prairie/cross-timbers region, not the true semi-arid short-grass prairie typical of the west.

Actually, it is largely agreed upon that Dallas is the "eastern" side of a transition, if the DFW metro were to constitute such a division. Areas west of DFW are on the "western" side.

And once again, "Southern" is a state of culture, not landscape. Why do you think many Central/South Floridians are trying to swear up and down that they are not Southern, when they have many of the same plants and animals associated with the South (alligators, bald cypress, pines, spanish moss, live oaks, etc).

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Why does all the west have to look the same to be the west? Not all of it has to be so dry. Dallas is still relatively dry anyway. It's when you reach about Canton or so, where its truly eastern looking. Shreveport and Dallas are not that far away but are in two different geographic biomes. One's in the plains, the other in the piney woods.

What part of Florida are you talking about? I grew up down there and been to nearly every corner of the state and the only "prairie" I can think of is the Everglades and sawgrass prairie, which is a marsh. The state is mostly swamps and woods. The "prairies" in Florida are swamps.
No, it is about climate. Dallas is a humid climate, which gets as much rain as cities like Chicago or Detroit, or even more. The "plains" in Dallas aren't the real, western plains; they are humid prairies typical of the East, and are completely edaphic (meaning that the prairie's existence is largely a factor of the soil).

As far as Florida's prairies, yes, there are the Everglades and saw-grass prairies. They are what are known as "wet prairies," which, in many cases, can look quite indistinguishable from marsh:
Campus Ecosystem Model (CEM)

Then you have areas known as "dry prairie:"
Dry Prairie in Florida // LandScope America
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Old 09-04-2016, 08:04 PM
 
20 posts, read 18,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Even though much of west Texas is the Bible Belt, it's not the same type you'd find in Alabama or Mississippi. It's not as judgy, as holier than thou or as homophobic as it is further east. I feel more comfortable holding another man's hand in rural west Texas than I would in rural Louisiana, rural Mississippi, rural Alabama, rural Georgie. etc. etc.

It's very Christian, but it's also more "let and let live" which is a western American mindset. Plus its a bit more diverse as you're likely to see more Lutherans and Catholics than the eastern part of the Bible Belt.
That's usually how I feel about Rural Texas.

Compared to Rural MS, AL, and GA, Texas always felt a bit more religious, right-wing, gun-toting, and etc.
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