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Old 09-05-2016, 01:59 PM
 
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Hi everybody,
I am a mid-20's college grad.I am a single Anglo man.My hometown is Midland,Texas.I am planning on moving to the Land of Enchantment in a few years after I get my business going well.My top two choices in New Mexico are Albuquerque and Las Cruces.I am leaning towards ABQ but I am afraid of the winters there.I was wondering if the winters there are similar to Denver since ABQ is about 5000 elevation or so give or take or are they more comparable to Lubbock or Amarillo, Texas?I know the average high and lows are readily available in this internet age, but I was wanting to hear from people with real-world experience. Midland, Lubbock and Amarillo all get real windy in winter time.I have been to Denver numerous times in winter and it did not bother me.Employment in New Mexico will not be a problem since I will be self-employed.Thanks in advance for all the help.
-WT
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Old 09-05-2016, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerntraveler View Post
Hi everybody,
I am a mid-20's college grad.I am a single Anglo man.My hometown is Midland,Texas.I am planning on moving to the Land of Enchantment in a few years after I get my business going well.My top two choices in New Mexico are Albuquerque and Las Cruces.I am leaning towards ABQ but I am afraid of the winters there.I was wondering if the winters there are similar to Denver since ABQ is about 5000 elevation or so give or take or are they more comparable to Lubbock or Amarillo, Texas?I know the average high and lows are readily available in this internet age, but I was wanting to hear from people with real-world experience. Midland, Lubbock and Amarillo all get real windy in winter time.I have been to Denver numerous times in winter and it did not bother me.Employment in New Mexico will not be a problem since I will be self-employed.Thanks in advance for all the help.
-WT
Albuquerque has relatively good winters I would say. Snow happens but is minimal. Albuquerque's equivalent in Arizona for weather (Prescott) has very tolerable winters, though Prescott is slightly colder (5 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). I do believe Prescott also snows more. Denver is also not in a desert, and is not only subject to more snow but colder temperatures (Denver is about 20 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). Denver is probably more equivalent to Santa Fe and Flagstaff (both Santa Fe and Flagstaff hover around 7k feet). Out here in the dry weather what rules king for temps are: A) Elevation and B) coastal and non-coastal. High elevation + non-coastal means cold winters and great summers. Low elevation + non-coastal means warm winters and HOT summers (think Yuma, Phoenix, etc.). I've only driven through ABQ but I do know that ABQ falls under the same weather patterns as Arizona for the most part.

I'm well experienced with ABQ's climate twin here in Arizona (again, Prescott) so I know the winters. For those who actually want a "true" winter that is not so extreme, it's probably the best option. I'd take a guess that 7k feet and up out in the West is when the winters start getting towards the extremes. If you don't want to deal with snow in the slightest it sounds like Las Cruces would be better. I don't know anything about Texas.
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Old 09-05-2016, 03:07 PM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,663,351 times
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Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Albuquerque has relatively good winters I would say. Snow happens but is minimal. Albuquerque's equivalent in Arizona for weather (Prescott) has very tolerable winters, though Prescott is slightly colder (5 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). I do believe Prescott also snows more. Denver is also not in a desert, and is not only subject to more snow but colder temperatures (Denver is about 20 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). Denver is probably more equivalent to Santa Fe and Flagstaff (both Santa Fe and Flagstaff hover around 7k feet). Out here in the dry weather what rules king for temps are: A) Elevation and B) coastal and non-coastal. High elevation + non-coastal means cold winters and great summers. Low elevation + non-coastal means warm winters and HOT summers (think Yuma, Phoenix, etc.). I've only driven through ABQ but I do know that ABQ falls under the same weather patterns as Arizona for the most part.

I'm well experienced with ABQ's climate twin here in Arizona (again, Prescott) so I know the winters. For those who actually want a "true" winter that is not so extreme, it's probably the best option. I'd take a guess that 7k feet and up out in the West is when the winters start getting towards the extremes. If you don't want to deal with snow in the slightest it sounds like Las Cruces would be better. I don't know anything about Texas.
Hi Prickly Pear,
I really appreciate the reply.We do get winter weather here in Midland, Texas from time to time.The average annual snowfall here is about 5 inches.The snowiest winter was a few years ago when we had 19.5 inches.I can handle a little snow.However, I do plan on living in Phoenix at some point in my life.Thanks again Prickly Pear.
-WT
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Old 09-05-2016, 05:32 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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If you can handle high plains Texas weather you can handle Albuquerque.
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Old 09-05-2016, 05:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
If you can handle high plains Texas weather you can handle Albuquerque.
Okay, that puts it in perspective.Thanks a lot.
-WT
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Old 09-05-2016, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,852 posts, read 6,186,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Albuquerque has relatively good winters I would say. Snow happens but is minimal. Albuquerque's equivalent in Arizona for weather (Prescott) has very tolerable winters, though Prescott is slightly colder (5 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). I do believe Prescott also snows more. Denver is also not in a desert, and is not only subject to more snow but colder temperatures (Denver is about 20 degrees colder in the winter than ABQ). Denver is probably more equivalent to Santa Fe and Flagstaff (both Santa Fe and Flagstaff hover around 7k feet). Out here in the dry weather what rules king for temps are: A) Elevation and B) coastal and non-coastal. High elevation + non-coastal means cold winters and great summers. Low elevation + non-coastal means warm winters and HOT summers (think Yuma, Phoenix, etc.). I've only driven through ABQ but I do know that ABQ falls under the same weather patterns as Arizona for the most part.

I'm well experienced with ABQ's climate twin here in Arizona (again, Prescott) so I know the winters. For those who actually want a "true" winter that is not so extreme, it's probably the best option. I'd take a guess that 7k feet and up out in the West is when the winters start getting towards the extremes. If you don't want to deal with snow in the slightest it sounds like Las Cruces would be better. I don't know anything about Texas.
Prescott is actually a bit warmer in the winter than Albuquerque but has about 2 and a half times the amount of snow. The nice thing about being at altitude in the winter is you get more radiant heat from the sun than you do at lower elevations.
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Old 09-06-2016, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Prescott is actually a bit warmer in the winter than Albuquerque but has about 2 and a half times the amount of snow. The nice thing about being at altitude in the winter is you get more radiant heat from the sun than you do at lower elevations.
Yeah but that radiant heat from the sun doesn't go away in the summer either, granted you aren't in a situation like SLC (high elevations and still rather hot) that's probably still a good thing. The sun is a blessing and a curse and while it doesn't seem that way, it'll make sense for anyone who lives in a desert. And at lower elevations, I'll pass on some of that radiant sun... Tucson has had enough of that!

I was a bit off on Prescott in comparison, I had a feeling Prescott snowed more because Prescott has different flora, a more "forested" and "green" area whereas ABQ had some sort of plains/desert hybrid thing going on, noticeable patches of grass and more shrubbery but still having noticeable amounts of dirt at the same time. At least out on the I-25 and in between Santa Fe it looked that way. Prescott has pine trees and aspens and so on.
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Old 09-06-2016, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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ABQ is cold in winter, especially at night. Daytime temps are decently mild, but not "warm" by any means. Winter nights are frigid. With all that being said, its far more liveable than Denver's winters, IMO. Its warmer, snows less, has more sun, and the winter doesnt last nearly as long as Denver's.
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Old 09-06-2016, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,852 posts, read 6,186,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
And at lower elevations, I'll pass on some of that radiant sun... Tucson has had enough of that!

.
LOL, as a former resident of Tucson (best years of my life) I used to describe walking out of your front door in Tucson is like getting smacked in the face with a ping pong paddle.

As to Albuquerque, other than being a little nippy in the winter and a few heavy snow falls on occasion, and summer being a hair on the warm side, it has a year round climate that's hard to beat.
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Old 09-06-2016, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
LOL, as a former resident of Tucson (best years of my life) I used to describe walking out of your front door in Tucson is like getting smacked in the face with a ping pong paddle.

As to Albuquerque, other than being a little nippy in the winter and a few heavy snow falls on occasion, and summer being a hair on the warm side, it has a year round climate that's hard to beat.
Now Santa Fe... That's where the good summers are! I was there a month ago so I know. Absolute paradise, just like Flagstaff is around this time of year.
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