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Old 09-06-2016, 04:26 PM
 
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I would say that Fall for much of the Northeast is probably the most consistent season in terms of weather.

Small towns may have festivals like this one in my area: LaFayette Apple Festival

It is a very popular festival in the area, which can have traffic backed up along Route 20 to I-81 at the hamlet of LaFayette. You also have multiple apple orchards/stands in that area of Route 20, where you can pick your own apples, get apple fritters, apple cider, apple pie, etc. They may sell pumpkins as well. One orchard also has apple vodka and a distillery. Beak & Skiff Apple Orchard

1911 Spirits | Premium small-batch handcrafted hard cider, vodka and gin made from Apples

I always thought that a great Fall time idea in the area for couples, families or for your "girl crew" would be to start at either Skaneateles or Cazenovia, with a lunch. Then, head down Route 20 to the orchards in LaFayette/Onondaga and end it with a dinner in either Skaneateles or Cazenovia. Both are relatively upscale villages on lakes, with a stereotypical New England look and feel. It would also be a drive through hills and valleys, with nice foliage too.

There is also the Onondaga Nation just north of LaFayette. They have their own school, but after 6th grade, they go to LaFayette Jr/Sr High. Hence the reason why that school is about 30% Native American.

You may find some recently transplanted Southerners in some Northeastern areas. Where I am, some may come to work at the University, by way of the military, a job opportunity or have family here.

As mentioned, cost of living in the Inland Northeast can actually be below the national level versus the most of the coastal/Bos-Wash portion of the Northeast.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-06-2016 at 04:53 PM..
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Old 09-06-2016, 05:50 PM
 
3,597 posts, read 1,533,669 times
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Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
It's very expensive to live in the Northeast but you get what you pay for. States in the northeast are not only the wealthiest, filled with some of the most successful people in the U.S., but also states like CT and MA rank in the top 5 for quality of life.
Gotta disagree on some of your generalizations. The "get what you pay for" thing isn't true most of the time in terms of heavy taxation and extraordinarily high cost of living. It's called Buying Power (COL vs. income). That also plays into the subjective term "wealthy". A person in the South or Upstate NY with $10m will be able to have MUCH more disposable income than that same person living in Boston or NYC. Too, Quality of Life is, again, a very subjective. I know my overall QOL is generally much higher than it would be if I lived anywhere along the I-95 corridor from DC to Boston. My wife's from Boston and can attest to that firsthand.
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:02 PM
 
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There's much to be gleaned from literature set in small town northeast. I recommend your wife take to reading about life in our small towns.

Off the top of my head I suggest

Robert Frost

Richard Russo

Elizabeth Strout

Carolyn Chute

Chris Bohjalian

Mary McGarry Morris

David Budbill

Galway Kinnell

These are all people who write very well of a culture and place they know very well. I'm sure I'm omitting a host of excellent others. I bet your local librarian will have some fine ideas. Happy reading! I wish I were setting out to re-read their work myself. Maybe I will!
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,027 posts, read 31,400,710 times
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Southernbored, if you'll go on Trulia and type in the name of some of those small towns in upstate NY, ME, or OH you'll see that home prices actually seem to be cheaper than they are down here in our area.
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
We vacationed in Jamestown, RI, in May. I don't know what her character is going to be doing but I could see a book taking place there. We rode over the entire island in just a couple of hours. It had one grocery store. People were friendly unlike Newport which is just across the bridge. I really enjoyed the spa on its main street. We enjoyed watching the wildlife from the timeshare where we stayed, Wyndham Overlook. We were just a few yards from the water and you could tell when the tide came in although we were not on the ocean..

Seriously? I've been there once and can only wonder what kind of people enjoy actually vacationing there. Unless they are desperate for a place to go on vacation. I thought it was kind of creepy - creepy place for creepy people. Ya know?
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:45 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,891,633 times
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Smuggler's Notch in Vermont has a lot of history and a lot of trees and mountains and covered bridges are marked on the state map. We enjoyed Smuggler's Notch too and went the entire length of highway 108. It is similar to the Blue Ridge Parkway but shorter. It goes from Stowe to the Canadian border. We are really enjoying our timeshare. We are not into touristy places where people go just so they can take pictures and brag about where they have been. We like off the beaten path type places where you get the feel of the locals. We drove 200 miles out of our way to stay away from NYC when we went to Jamestown.

In North Carolina you are in the mountains then drive through the piedmont and then the sandhills and finally get to the beach. In Rhode Island there were mountainous areas then nothing between that and the water. We had never been to a place just like that before.

When we got to Vermont I was a little disappointed that I had traveled about 1000 miles and the place we stayed looked a lot like our own mountains. The covered bridges made the trip worth it though.

Most people rave about the food in New England. We always take soup along just in case we end up in an isolated place. We learned that when we made our first trip to New Bern, NC. We ate in the condo the most in New England both places we stayed more than any other place we ever went to. We found the food was overpriced and not that good. And it was so cold we almost froze. Their May is more like our January in Jamestown.

Last edited by NCN; 09-06-2016 at 08:30 PM..
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Old 09-06-2016, 08:14 PM
 
8,814 posts, read 4,726,240 times
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When I think of books I think of late Spring/Summer/Fall in Northern New England Coastal towns like Rockport, Stonington, Wellfleet, Providencetown, Bar Harbor, Berkshire mountain areas, New Milford/Kent/Litchfield, Exeter, Maine islands, or Kennebunkport.

Areas near Franconia Notch.
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Old 09-06-2016, 08:39 PM
 
56,645 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I would say that Fall for much of the Northeast is probably the most consistent season in terms of weather.

Small towns may have festivals like this one in my area: LaFayette Apple Festival

It is a very popular festival in the area, which can have traffic backed up along Route 20 to I-81 at the hamlet of LaFayette. You also have multiple apple orchards/stands in that area of Route 20, where you can pick your own apples, get apple fritters, apple cider, apple pie, etc. They may sell pumpkins as well. One orchard also has apple vodka and a distillery. Beak & Skiff Apple Orchard

1911 Spirits | Premium small-batch handcrafted hard cider, vodka and gin made from Apples

I always thought that a great Fall time idea in the area for couples, families or for your "girl crew" would be to start at either Skaneateles or Cazenovia, with a lunch. Then, head down Route 20 to the orchards in LaFayette/Onondaga and end it with a dinner in either Skaneateles or Cazenovia. Both are relatively upscale villages on lakes, with a stereotypical New England look and feel. It would also be a drive through hills and valleys, with nice foliage too.

There is also the Onondaga Nation just north of LaFayette. They have their own school, but after 6th grade, they go to LaFayette Jr/Sr High. Hence the reason why that school is about 30% Native American.

You may find some recently transplanted Southerners in some Northeastern areas. Where I am, some may come to work at the University, by way of the military, a job opportunity or have family here.

As mentioned, cost of living in the Inland Northeast can actually be below the national level versus the most of the coastal/Bos-Wash portion of the Northeast.
More Fall festivals: #DoYourThing :: Events Calendar

New York Top Fall Events | New York Fall Festivals
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Old 09-06-2016, 09:07 PM
 
Location: New York NY
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One big difference between fall in the South and in the Northeast: college football. Outside of Penn State and OSU, nobody here cares much about local college football, whereas its huge almost everywhere in the South.
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Old 09-07-2016, 06:57 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,719,667 times
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The pop vs. soda boundary crosses the OP's interest area. Basically area code 585 (NY)/814 (PA) and west is pop, 315/607 (NY) and 570/717 (PA) and east is soda.

Food regionalism is on a more local scale than an Ohio to Massachusetts arc. Most folks in Binghamton wouldn't know a garbage plate, while many in Rochester would not recognize a spiedie. That's probably best looked at on a media market basis once the locality is chosen.
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