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Old 09-06-2016, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,047,024 times
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Ok guys, this is not going to be a thread about where to move. I hope for this thread to give me some good info on what living in the northeast is like. Now, my wife and I are interested in moving north, but we are far more interested, for the time being anyways, in information about life in the north/northeast in general.


Let me explain a bit... My wife has a health condition that doesn't allow her to do much work outside of the house, so she has been doing quite a bit of writing. She has actually completed 2 novels, and is currently working on a third. She wants to set this third novel in the northeast (or part of the Midwest). (Long story short, her story arc for the series leads the character there). She has left it open as to where the final novel will take place, but it will be set in the fall in either the northeast or the Midwest (She has it narrowed to Ohio, New York, Connecticut, or Massachusetts).


I realize this is a fairly large area, and they are all pretty different, but again, we are simply looking to get some input from people who live in these areas. Input from transplants would be great as well, because her character will be a transplant to the area.


So, what are some things a newly transplanted southerner would need to know about these areas, specifically about fall in these areas? At what time of year do most of the fall festivals start up? How is life different compared to the south? How are the people different? How are transplants generally treated? Are there any regional foods, words, activities that a new resident may not know about? etc etc....


Any help would be appreciated! If you think it is relevant, please post it!
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Old 09-06-2016, 11:32 AM
 
Location: USA
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It's very expensive to live in the Northeast but you get what you pay for. States in the northeast are not only the wealthiest, filled with some of the most successful people in the U.S., but also states like CT and MA rank in the top 5 for quality of life.
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Old 09-06-2016, 11:46 AM
 
21,186 posts, read 30,343,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
It's very expensive to live in the Northeast but you get what you pay for. States in the northeast are not only the wealthiest, filled with some of the most successful people in the U.S., but also states like CT and MA rank in the top 5 for quality of life.
I think that's kind of a generalization as there are a number of less expensive areas such as Upstate New York, Western Massachusetts, most of Rhode Island and parts of both Vermont or New Hampshire. The region does enjoy the highest quality of life in terms of safety/low crime, the environment, culture, school quality and a few other factors. Because it is far less transient in terms of newcomers my experience is that in most areas (outside of rural locations) newcomers are well received/welcomed.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:24 PM
 
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Areas in New England near Boston, New York City, and Providence are congested. Additionally, too overcrowded very few space. Taxes are high for the most part some States could have no sales tax and some could have a high sales tax close to 7%.

Education being great up here feel is over hyped. If you can afford to live in a nice area your going to have great education.

Costs of property is high, especially when closer to cities.

Crime is high, again if near cities. Farther away from cities feel life improves in New England. It is a trade off of jobs and some places can be isolated.

The rural areas are a blend of forest & farmland or smaller seaports usually are quiet (Outside of the summer).

I've seen festivals start mid-August go to late September. Then some Apple & Pumpkin festivals kick in October.

Summer and Fall in my personal experience are the best seasons in the State. Winter is too dreary, grey, dead, cold, and too much snow. Spring is wet, cold, grey, and muddy.

Cost of goods and gas can be expensive in New England.

Most people mind their own unless you do need help. Some individuals in rural areas can be friendly and open.

Small towns are tight knit.

Life is fast up here for the most part. Everything feels rushed.

Many famous writers have lived in New England. Lots of history. Lot of paranormal activity. Different architecture has it's own unique beauty. Love New England lighthouses.

Last edited by RunD1987; 09-06-2016 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:26 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbored View Post
So, what are some things a newly transplanted southerner would need to know about these areas, specifically about fall in these areas?
It gets really cold in the northeast and it can happen more quickly than you might expect.

That's probably the most significant difference that you'll notice.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:38 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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We vacationed in Jamestown, RI, in May. I don't know what her character is going to be doing but I could see a book taking place there. We rode over the entire island in just a couple of hours. It had one grocery store. People were friendly unlike Newport which is just across the bridge. I really enjoyed the spa on its main street. We enjoyed watching the wildlife from the timeshare where we stayed, Wyndham Overlook. We were just a few yards from the water and you could tell when the tide came in although we were not on the ocean.

We visited a lighthouse with a very rocky shore since we got there before our reservations started. There looked like maybe a class reunion going on but not one person in the group would speak to us. I understand from talking to others on City-Data that this is normal for the area. We thought maybe they spoke another language. Groceries cost about 25% more than they do here in North Carolina.

If your wife is up to traveling you may be able to stay on the island by checking out www.extraholidays.com. We went over to Newport but after visiting there I was so happy we had chosen Jamestown. Newport was not friendly. Lots of money in Newport but who wants to live around all those rude people.

Newport would be a place where they could go for outings. We stayed at Mystic on our way there and it is another place for people in her book to visit.

It rained every day we were there. Fog came in many times at night. Classic book happenings. Boston is close enough for a day trip. We decided to rest in the condo instead. Weather was horrible the day we had planned for Boston.

Wyndham Bay Voyage Inn and Wyndham Newport Overlook are both in Jamestown. The other places are at Newport. Click on "Take Me There" and even if she were not to be able to go there, the information given for each timeshare activity, food, etc. could give her ideas for the book character's outings.

Last edited by NCN; 09-06-2016 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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It really depends which specific areas of those states you are interested in because all of the states have pretty distinct regions that vary in topography, cost of living, employment opportunity etc.

In general I would say there is pretty big divide between the coastal metropolitan areas in Northeast and the far inland ones. In general the cities closer to the coast tend to be more cosmopolitan, higher concentrations of wealth in their suburbs, higher population/fewer surrounding rural areas, higher cost of living and better recovered from de-industrialization. I.e. Boston area vs. Western Mass, NYC metro vs. Western New York, Philadelphia vs. Western Pennsylvania.

For obvious reasons the Northeast has a ton of colonial history/sites dating back before the revolution.

In terms of people it is extremely common for northeasters to be only first or second generation Americans. Growing up in New Jersey the vast majority of my friends were either the children or grandchildren of immigrants. Italians, Irish, Jews, Puerto Ricans are all common ethnic/cultural groups in the Northeast.

Fall is gorgeous in the northeast, particularly the vibrant foliage. I don't think this is exclusive to the northeast but Hayrides, pumpkin picking and apple cider are all common fall activities. The night before Halloween in New York City/New Jersey is known as mischief night by many.
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Old 09-06-2016, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,047,024 times
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First off, thank you all for your replies! I will try to respond the best I can...


humpday & Kyle- Yea, I am aware of the cost. From what I understand, just about everything is more expensive, at least in parts. I know from talking to ckthankgod previously that upstate New York is definitely different in cost, but from what my wife has told me, she is probably going to be setting it in a cheaper area near the lake in OH, NOT in the immediate vicinity of NYC or Boston, and not sure where in CT, really. How much more are things like groceries and restaurants, and gas?


NCN- She hasn't really mentioned RI, but I will certainly run it by her!


Buckeye- I think you hit on the major reasons she wants to set the book up that way. The fall foliage and the sheer amount of historical sites is a big draw for us both in real life, but it also adds quite a bit to a novel. I know the areas are quite different, I am just trying to get a grasp on how life is in general, in these areas. Just to let you all know, she is planning on setting it in a smaller town. She may put it near a larger metro, but I don't think she wants it to be in an expensive area. Think quintessential small town New England, like a Thomas Kincaid painting or something!
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Old 09-06-2016, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Baldwin County, AL
2,446 posts, read 1,047,024 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
Areas in New England near Boston, New York City, and Providence are congested. Additionally, too overcrowded very few space. Taxes are high for the most part some States could have no sales tax and some could have a high sales tax close to 7%.

Education being great up here feel is over hyped. If you can afford to live in a nice area your going to have great education.

Costs of property is high, especially when closer to cities.

Crime is high, again if near cities. Farther away from cities feel life improves in New England. It is a trade off of jobs and some places can be isolated.

The rural areas are a blend of forest & farmland or smaller seaports usually are quiet (Outside of the summer).

I've seen festivals start mid-August go to late September. Then some Apple & Pumpkin festivals kick in October.

Summer and Fall in my personal experience are the best seasons in the State. Winter is too dreary, grey, dead, cold, and too much snow. Spring is wet, cold, grey, and muddy.

Cost of goods and gas can be expensive in New England.

Most people mind their own unless you do need help. Some individuals in rural areas can be friendly and open.

Small towns are tight knit.

Life is fast up here for the most part. Everything feels rushed.

Many famous writers have lived in New England. Lots of history. Lot of paranormal activity. Different architecture has it's own unique beauty. Love New England lighthouses.

Wanted to address this post just a bit! First off, thank you for the input! Lot of good stuff here!


She isn't planning on setting it in a congested area, that much I do know. She is going for more of a small town feel. As I mentioned above, she is thinking more along the lines of quintessential New England.


As far as the sales tax, we are used to it being between 9-10% where we currently live, so that seems like it won't be too different. I think the main sticker shock would be things like housing, property tax (which I am not sure would matter for her purposes), and things like Light/Gas/Water bills. Am I wrong there?


So would you say the people in the rural areas tend to be more friendly than the ones in the large metros? Are the people in the small towns so tightly knit that a newcomer would feel out of place? Does the pace of life extend to these smaller towns?


The history and the fall beauty are the main things for her book, from what I understand, but she is wanting to be as realistic about life in those parts as possible.
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Old 09-06-2016, 04:10 PM
 
8,794 posts, read 4,713,823 times
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I find small towns if you get involved in community organizations Churches/EMS/Volunteer Firefighter so forth more accepting.

I say the small towns further away from the big 2 and the minor cities are slower: NYC/Boston, Hartford/Providence/Springfield/Worcester/Manchester/Portland.
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