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Old 09-07-2016, 06:32 AM
 
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Years ago when I was young I bought DeLorme atlases for entire states I had yet to visit.

I noticed in the Midwest from Illinois on west that town street grids often started aligned with a river or railroad, then grew outward to align with the prevailing land survey orientation.

Some towns never grew much beyond their original plat, it seemed, so maybe just a couple of blocks were more of the E-W direction. Other communities, such as Denver, grew sufficiently to make the transition in the center of town.

Further east, say in Pennsylvania, it seemed that the original grid orientation tended to be preserved as far out as blocks went. Most of PA did not have an original rectilinear rural survey grid.

Ohio and Indiana, though surveyed originally using the PLSS, seemed to have more of an Eastern pattern to maintaining street grid orientation to the edge of grid-ness, though there must be counter-examples.

I was reminded of my impression when I saw the CBC posted an article about Calgary's shifting grid pattern, which was subtler than many: The crooked heart of Calgary: A quirk of history - Calgary - CBC News

The article goes on to mention a missing numbered street as a result of the grid shift. I recall in Moline, IL that letters were added to numbers on the makeup streets around a grid shift.

In these areas, is there commonly accepted terminology to describe shifting street grids?
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Seattle has three different grids due to the three different founders, however the prevailing grid is a simple North/South and East/West system.

In San Francisco, Market Street represents the shift to a diagonal grid to the south/east (mostly in Soma) and the classic "Compass" grid as I call it in most of the rest of the city.

Burnside St. in Portland has a similar effect in terms of starting a diagonal section to its south as described with SF.

The northwest section of the core of Baltimore is a diagonal grid compared with most of the rest of the city, with a few additional pecularities.

Philadelphia also has sections with diagonal grids: much of Southwest (divided by Baltimore Ave. on the North), Northwest, and from Fishtown, through Kensington up through much of Northeast.

NYC is also part of this: a small portion of southeastern Manhattan has a "diagonal" section, the section between the Brooklyn and Williamsburg bridges. McDonald Avenue in Central Brooklyn as well as portion of Bay Parkway near Bensonhurst and the northern part of Stillwell Avenue serve as dividers between a reverse Manhattan-style grid and an "Alphabet City"-style grid rotated clockwise 90 degrees. In fact, many of the outer boroughs exhibit grids at different angles due to their origins as suburbs prior to the city encroaching on the existing roads so that the streets were laid at appropriate angles to accommodate them.

Atlanta also has an angle change in its downtown.
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Pittsburgh has no consistent grid, which is partially due to the crazy topography making it impossible. Even within neighborhoods, there are discontinuous grids however for various historic reasons. For example, Downtown has two different street grids which come together at Liberty Avenue. Downtown was originally supposed to be laid out with the southern grid, but when government officials got out to Pittsburgh in the early 19th century, they found that residents had set up their own shantytown areas along the Allegheny River using a totally different street grid. They decided not to bother demolishing it, and we ended up with some crazy intersections there.

Another example is in Pittsburgh's South Side. The area was originally incorporated as two independent boroughs (Birmingham and East Birmingham) before later being absorbed into the City of Pittsburgh. The boundary between the two was at S 17th Street. Both boroughs set up their own road systems. While the main business street (now East Carson) ran through both, they decided to set up different grids for the back streets, resulting in a discontinuous grid.
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
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Not 100% sure this is what you have in mind, but Evansville IN has a tilted downtown grid and a non-tilted grid every where else. Downtown is a grid facing the river, SW to NE; where everything else is traditional east/west.
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Old 09-07-2016, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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I know Denver has two different grids, diagonal around downtown, and regular E-W/N-S for the rest of the city
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I know Denver has two different grids, diagonal around downtown, and regular E-W/N-S for the rest of the city
Yes, confusing driving on 15th that intersects with 29th, etc
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
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Tulsa's downtown grid is different from the rest of the city. Downtown OKC's grid is also rotated a bit, but it's ever so slight.
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Old 09-07-2016, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
Tulsa's downtown grid is different from the rest of the city. Downtown OKC's grid is also rotated a bit, but it's ever so slight.
Norman is really pronounced. The old core of town is square to the railroad but 85% of Norman is gridded in the cardinal planes. I'm wondering where the skew is in OKC. It seems straight to the cardinal planes to me.
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Norman is really pronounced. The old core of town is square to the railroad but 85% of Norman is gridded in the cardinal planes. I'm wondering where the skew is in OKC. It seems straight to the cardinal planes to me.
North of Sheridan and east of Walker in downtown OKC it is slightly rotated to the NE, square to the same railroad that goes through downtown Norman.
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Old 09-07-2016, 08:01 PM
 
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LA's sorta curves. In DTLA, streets run from SW to NE. West of DTLA through Hancokc Park/Ktown/Hollywood/South Central all the streets run perfectly North-South. As you go further west to Westwood/West LA/Sawtelle, the streets run from the SE to the NW.

Even that is messed up within the same boundaries. Mid Wilshire/Miracle Mile should be perfectly North-South, but it's SW to NE with San Vicente meandering through because it dgaf what it does anywhere in the city. It stops when it wants to, starts where it pleases, and take various angles and makes for some truly f***ed up intersections (Fairfax/San Vicente/Olympic; Burton/San Vicente/La Cienega/3rd).

DTLA can't even keep its grid straight. East of Hill, streets randomly curve when they easily could have followed a grid through Skid Row and other parts of eastern DTLA. Main and Spring intersect for some reason even though they're parallel.

Downtown Beverly Hill isn't part of LA city, but it's always been stupid. Downtown BH is a random triangle with a diagonal grid between other N/S and E/W gridded streets.

Venice Beach has like 5 grid systems just within itself. Idk if that's because of its past as being all canals or what.
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