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Old 09-09-2016, 10:36 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
979 posts, read 356,867 times
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Political party may not always be a good indicator. Here in the Pittsburgh area where I live, and especially within the city limits, voting is overwhelmingly Democrat. However, there are many, especially older people, who vote Democrat because of strong union roots, but hold political positions that would normally be thought of as conservative ones. There are many strongly religious people who oppose abortion, gun control, etc. but vote for Democrats.
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Old 09-09-2016, 10:46 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,008 posts, read 4,119,343 times
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I think political party is one indicator but isn't the only one. Orange County, CA is Republican, but it's more culturally liberal than many blue-voting areas in the South. I think it comes down to three things.

1) Cultural influence of evangelical Christianity (the higher, the more conservative)
2) Acceptance and visibility of the LGBT community i.e. can a person be openly gay and not run into issues?
3) Visibility of the creative class i.e. artists, musicians, etc
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Old 09-09-2016, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,855 posts, read 7,804,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlemonjello View Post
Another measure is what percentage of white voters vote democrat. There is a link below:

http://www.whitdem.org/2012WhiteVote.html
Great link with great stats. I learned that 23% of whites in Harris County (TX) voted for Obama in 2012 vs 81% of whites in Philadelphia County (PA) for Obama.

This explains why I encountered so many white Republicans in when I lived in Houston, while nearly every white person I meet in Philly is a Dem (and voted for Obama).
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Old 09-09-2016, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,201,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Great link with great stats. I learned that 23% of whites in Harris County (TX) voted for Obama in 2012 vs 81% of whites in Philadelphia County (PA) for Obama.

This explains why I encountered so many white Republicans in when I lived in Houston, while nearly every white person I meet in Philly is a Dem (and voted for Obama).
Yep. Harris County whites voted Democrat on the same level that Collin and Denton counties did in suburban Dallas area. It definitely backs the argument that Ive made that Dallas is more liberal than Houston more apparent.
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Old 09-09-2016, 11:44 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,008 posts, read 4,119,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Great link with great stats. I learned that 23% of whites in Harris County (TX) voted for Obama in 2012 vs 81% of whites in Philadelphia County (PA) for Obama.

This explains why I encountered so many white Republicans in when I lived in Houston, while nearly every white person I meet in Philly is a Dem (and voted for Obama).
I was shocked that only 23% of whites in Harris County voted for Obama. I would expect a city that voted for Annise Parker to be a bit more "liberal" than that. From the time I've spent in Houston, it didn't feel overly conservative or evangelical, at least not compared to Oklahoma City. Maybe it's because of the oil & gas industry in Houston?
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Old 09-09-2016, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,163,901 times
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Miami Beach is super super super socially liberal but the rest of Florida is a mix of conservative and dem. I do not really get into politics. I just care to live in a socially liberal city. I come from the Cincinnati suburbs where everyone is super socially conservative.
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Old 09-09-2016, 12:07 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,266 posts, read 6,349,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I think political party is one indicator but isn't the only one. Orange County, CA is Republican, but it's more culturally liberal than many blue-voting areas in the South. I think it comes down to three things.

1) Cultural influence of evangelical Christianity (the higher, the more conservative)
2) Acceptance and visibility of the LGBT community i.e. can a person be openly gay and not run into issues?
3) Visibility of the creative class i.e. artists, musicians, etc
^^This.
These are things which are important in calling a place liberal vs conservative I think.

But there is one other I would add. And that is whether the city is dominated by new industries or old ones.
Rustbelt cities, IMO, will tend to be a bit more conservative, even though they consistently vote Democratic for the most part. By contrast tech centers, finance centers, education centers also vote Democratic, but rate a bit "better" in the three categories listed above.
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Old 09-09-2016, 01:14 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,253,759 times
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In my opinion, a "liberal" place should have a live and let live mentality/vibe, regardless of voting habits.
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Old 09-09-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Boston
432 posts, read 356,668 times
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Interesting topic. I view a city as liberal if it's open to LGBT rights, racially accepting of others,pro-abortion, not really religious, ect. It always annoys me when people on here go "Detroit is one of the most liberal cities in the US". NO, Detroit is one of the most democratic cities, just because you are a democrat doesn't mean you are liberal. Same goes for Memphis, it's anything but liberal..it just has a high black population that tends always to vote democratic.
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Old 09-09-2016, 02:39 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by intheclouds1 View Post
Interesting topic. I view a city as liberal if it's open to LGBT rights, racially accepting of others,pro-abortion, not really religious, ect. It always annoys me when people on here go "Detroit is one of the most liberal cities in the US". NO, Detroit is one of the most democratic cities, just because you are a democrat doesn't mean you are liberal. Same goes for Memphis, it's anything but liberal..it just has a high black population that tends always to vote democratic.
But Detroit really is liberal though, although I wouldn't say it's one of the most liberal cities in the country.

http://hrc-assets.s3-website-us-east...higan_2015.pdf
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