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Old 09-11-2016, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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VA Beach has palms - not native, but they do survive.
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:58 PM
 
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Charlotte, NC has palm trees as well though it is still quite rare to see them even though a small variety of them can in fact survive here.
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PyroZach View Post
Charlotte, NC has palm trees as well though it is still quite rare to see them even though a small variety of them can in fact survive here.
We are talking places where you would see them lining a street or highway, not where you will see 1 or 2 in someone's backyard that prob require winter protection
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PyroZach View Post
Charlotte, NC has palm trees as well though it is still quite rare to see them even though a small variety of them can in fact survive here.

You occasionally see cultivated Palm trees in the Knoxville Tennessee area. Just like you said it is not common, but some people still do it. Personally I think Palm trees in the interior South are out of place, they belong on the coast. They supposedly can be grown anywhere in USDA zone 7 in the South though so I bet they can be found in some numbers throughout the South.. I would think however that it would be impossible to grow them any further north than Tennessee, North Carolina or Arkansas. Even a few hundred miles north of here it is significantly colder in the winter.
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Old 09-11-2016, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
You occasionally see cultivated Palm trees in the Knoxville Tennessee area. Just like you said it is not common, but some people still do it. Personally I think Palm trees in the interior South are out of place, they belong on the coast. They supposedly can be grown anywhere in USDA zone 7 in the South though so I bet they can be found in some numbers throughout the South.. I would think however that it would be impossible to grow them any further north than Tennessee, North Carolina or Arkansas. Even a few hundred miles north of here it is significantly colder in the winter.
Only windmills, sabals and needles are hardy to Zone 7

Washingtonia's are only hardy to 8B, CIDP are only hardy to 9B, and Royal's don't do well below 10A, hence Phoenix (zone 10A) has Royals and Las Vegas (zone 9B) doesn't
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Old 09-11-2016, 11:11 PM
 
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Where the gulf stream starts to move away from the north carolina coast is the furthest northern range for native palms in the southeast. It gets much tougher above that gulf stream close to the shore range for palms to grow , virginia beach has a few I believe. It is really interesting to see the differences in sea temps as you move from virginia into north carolina, shows you the amazing effect the gulf stream has on southern weather and vegetation
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:57 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Originally Posted by Eddie1070 View Post
When do you usually see the first Palm tree like when heading south from flagstaff to Phoenix or going from Albuquerque to Las cruces or even from Atlanta to Tallahassee? It's always awesome to know that you are crossing to the next growing zone where Palm trees can be planted
Regarding the bolded part of the quoted text, never.

Unless you are referring to cultivated palms which can be found in Albuquerque itself and points north. Those would be the cold-hardy palms like Washintonia robusta.

In southern New Mexico there are some cultivated, taller 'tree-like' palms, Washingtonia filifera (?) as far north as Truth or Consequences (zone 8a), but they are not native to the region and difficult to successfully keep alive due to frosts and/or dryness. Otherwise I suspect they would be more common.

This thread has some pictures of palms in T or C.
http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index....nsequences-nm/
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Regarding the bolded part of the quoted text, never.

Unless you are referring to cultivated palms which can be found in Albuquerque itself and points north. Those would be the cold-hardy palms like Washintonia robusta.

In southern New Mexico there are some cultivated, taller 'tree-like' palms, Washingtonia filifera (?) as far north as Truth or Consequences (zone 8a), but they are not native to the region and difficult to successfully keep alive due to frosts and/or dryness. Otherwise I suspect they would be more common.

This thread has some pictures of palms in T or C.
Palms in Truth or Consequences, NM - TRAVEL LOGS - PalmTalk
He didn't say native palms, he just said palms period, and you should know that on 25, the first palms show up by ToC and get more numerous around Hatch
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Old 09-12-2016, 05:38 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Yeah sorry I didn't put that they didn't have to be native ��
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Old 09-12-2016, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,683,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
What about California's Central Valley?

I'd assume the "palm line" would be somewhere around Yuba City or Chico. Anyone know for sure?
Redding, CA. Though not sure they are native, probably not. I've seen palms in the Pacific Northwest, in Tri-Cities, WA, and in some Seattle neighborhoods, but not to any great extent, and certainly non-native.
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